• Title, Summary, Keyword: Sesame Hulls

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Studies on the Toxic Effect of Sesame Hulls in the Diet of Albino Rats (참깨피(皮)의 독성효과(毒性效果)에 관(關)한 연구(硏究))

  • Park, Won-Oack;Lee, Yul;Sung, Nak-Eung
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.6 no.3
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    • pp.147-157
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    • 1974
  • This study was undertaken to observe the effect of sesame in the diet of rats (Splague Dowley). Comparisons were made of weight gains, organ weights and the cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride content of the blood serum and liver tissue. Rats weighing 67-80 g were used for the study, while rats weighing 160-165 g were used in the study. In the both studies, the experimental animals were fed on sesame mixtures for 24 weeks. The study was conducted to determine the effect of sesame hulls which are known to contain a high proportion of oxalic acid and phytic acid, which are toxic substances causing various physical disorders. The rats were divided into four groups, a control group which was fed on a standard diet and three groups fed with 20%, 10% and 5% mixtures of sesame seed hulls respectively. The study was designed to observe the same effect, but in this case the rats were divided into two groups, one fed with a 5% mixture of whole sesame seeds and the other with a 5% mixture of dehulled seeds. The results are as follows: 1) An examination of weight gains showed that group I and II which were fed on 20% and 10% mixture of sesame hulls were significantly retarded in comparison with the control group(P<0. 05). 2) Comparisons of organ weights, group I (20% mixture) showed relatively lower weights(P<0.05). 3) The cholesterol content of the blood serum and liver tissue of group I (20% mixture) and group II (10% mixture) were significantly higher than that of the control. 4) The group fed on the whole sesame seed diet and that fed on the dehulled seed diet differed significantly from each other. 5) With the results stated above, the investigators could observe that a high content of sesame hulls in the diet caused retardation in growth and might be the cause of many physical disorders. Though these effects are not important in Korea at present, the increasing intake of sesame seeds and oils indicates that it may become an important problems.

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Growth Performance, Carcass and Meat Characteristics of Black Goat Kids Fed Sesame Hulls and Prosopis juliflora Pods

  • Abdullah, Abdullah Y.;Obeidat, Belal S.;Muwalla, Marwan M.;Matarneh, Sulaiman K.;Ishmais, Majdi A. Abu
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.9
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    • pp.1217-1226
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    • 2011
  • Finding alternative feeds, such as sesame hulls and Prosopis juliflora species can attenuate difficulties of feed shortage and reduce the cost of animal feed in arid and semi-arid countries. Thirty-two Black male kids with similar initial weights (BW = $16.7{\pm}0.80\;kg$) and $120{\pm}5\;d$ of age, were used to evaluate the effect of replacing barley grains and soybean meal with Prosopis juliflora pods (PJP) and sesame hulls (SH) on growth performance, digestibility and carcass and meat characteristics. Kids were equally divided into four dietary treatment groups for an 84-d fattening period. Treatment diets had similar crude protein (CP) and metabolizable energy (ME). The treatment groups were: (T1) no PJP nor SH, (T2) 10% PJP and 20% SH, (T3) 15% PJP and 15% SH, and (T4) 20% PJP and 10% SH. A tendency was detected (p<0.08) for dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) intakes that were greater for T2 than T3 and T4 while T1 was not different from all other treatment groups. Ether extract (EE) intake was the greatest (p<0.05) for T2 and the lowest for T1. Acid detergent fiber (ADF) intake was greater (p<0.05) for T2 than T1 while T3 and T4 were intermediate. Final live weight, average daily gain (ADG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were comparable among different treatment groups. Digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NDF and ADF were similar among all treatment groups, however, EE digestibility was the lowest (p<0.05) for T1 when compared to other treatments. In addition, nitrogen intake, nitrogen in urine and retained and retention percentages were similar among all treatment groups. However, N loss in feces was higher (p<0.05) for T2 than T3 and T4 while T1 was intermediate. No differences were observed among treatment groups with respect to fasting live weight, hot and cold carcass weights, dressing-out percentages, mesenteric fat, visceral organs, carcass cuts percentages and carcass linear dimensions. No differences were also observed for dissected loin, leg, rack and shoulder tissues except in the total bone % for loin cuts and in the meat to bone ratio for rack cuts. T3 has the greatest total bone % and the lowest meat to bone ratio when compared to all other treatment groups. No differences were observed between treatment groups in all quality characteristics of the longissimus muscle. The present study demonstrates the potential of using PJP and SH for growing kids without adverse effects on growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality.

Relationship between Vitamin E and Polyunsaturated Fat - A comparative animal study emphasizing perilla seed oil as a fat constituent - (비타민 E와 불포화 지방과의 관계 - 들깨유(油)를 중심으로 한 동물의 비교 연구 -)

  • Leekim, Yang-Cha;Kwak, Tong-Kyung;Lee, Ki-Yull
    • Journal of Nutrition and Health
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    • v.9 no.4
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    • pp.19-27
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    • 1976
  • Perilla (frutescens) seed oil, which is widely used as a source of vegetable oil in Korea, contains a strikingly large amount (58.4% of total fatty acids) of polyunsaturated linolenic acid (18 : 3) which is one of the essential fatty acids. Our hypothesis was that vitamin E contained in this oil would not be enough to prevent peroxidation of this polyunsaturated oil. A comparative study was carried out using rats and chicks devided into seven groups with various diet combinations emphasizing fat sources for the period of four weeks. The level of fat in each diet was 15% and animals were fed ad libitum. Various diet combinations were as follows; perilla seed oil and sesame seed oil with and without vitamin E supplementation, tallow as a saturated fat source and perilla seed hull group (10% at the expense of carbohydrate). The fat constituents of control group were consisted of 50% vegetable oil and 50% animal fat. A few important findings are as follows: 1. Rats fed perilla seed oil lost their hair focally around the neck and suffered from a bad skin lesion at the same place. In chicks, yellow pigmentation both of feather and of skin was clearly observed only in groups fed perilla seed oil with or without vitamin E supplementation. The basis of biochemical mechanisms of this phenomena remains as an important research interest. 2. The mean value for hematocrit was significantly lower for the chicks fed perilla seed oil than for those fed control diet. This result seems to be attributable to the effect on the red cell membrane known as peroxidation-hemolysis of vitamin E deficiency. 3. The serum cholesterol level was higher for the rats fed perilla seed oil than for those fed control diet, whereas in chicks the group fed perilla seed oil showed lower value than the control group indicating that different animal species could vary in their responses to the same diet. 4. In pathological examinations, the sign of hepatic fibrosis was seen in the perilla seed hull group and it was noticeable that the level of hepatic RNA was significantly increased in the rat recovering from vitamin E deficiency. It is hoped that more detailed studies on perilla seed oil and hulls will soon be carried out in many aspects especially i) at various levels of fat in the diet, ii) in relation to dietary selenium level and iii) to find an optimum level of dietary essential fatty acids in terms of P/S ratio using various animal species. In the mean time, the public should be informed to preserve this particular oil with care to minimize fatty acid oxidation and should be discouraged from overconsuming this oil. This study was supported by UB (United Board) Research Grant (Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea)

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