• Title, Summary, Keyword: Revictimization

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Impacts of Repeated Victimization from Domestic Violence on Depression, and Moderating Effects of Social Support Networks : Focusing on Wives Whose Husbands Participated in the Correction and Rehabilitation Program for Family Violence Perpetrators (아내폭력 재피해 경험이 여성의 우울에 미치는 영향과 사회적 지지관계망의 조절효과 - 가정폭력 행위자 교정.치료프로그램 참여 남성의 아내를 중심으로 -)

  • Kim, Jae-Yop;Chung, Yun-Kyung;Lee, Keun-Young
    • Journal of the Korean Home Economics Association
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    • v.46 no.8
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    • pp.85-95
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    • 2008
  • This study examined the revictimization of wives from repeated husband violence and how that affected their depression. It also explored whether social support networks can have moderating effects. Sixty-four wives participated in the research group, 72.3% of whom had experienced repeated verbal violence, and 29.2% experienced repeated physical violence since their husbands participated in the correction and rehabilitation program for family violence perpetrators. Revictimization from repeated husband-to-wife violence was proven to significantly influence wife depression. To moderate the harmful effects of repeated domestic violence on depression, social support networks were observed to provide protective reinforcements. However, the findings of this study did not support the notion that social support networks have moderating effects on wife depression, while a strong negative relationship was established between professional networks of social support networks. Based on these results, the research discussion here advocates for an intervention that promotes psychological health to wives who are exposed to repeated domestic violence.

The Effect of Emotional Maltreatment by Parents on Revictimization of Emotional Maltreatment by Youth Peers - Multiple Mediated Effects of Depression and Social Withdrawal - (부모에 의한 정서폭력이 청소년 또래에 의한 정서폭력 재피해에 미치는 영향 - 우울과 사회적 위축의 다중매개효과분석 -)

  • Heo, In Yeong
    • Korean Journal of Social Welfare
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    • v.69 no.2
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    • pp.63-88
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    • 2017
  • This study was to find out the effect of emotional maltreatment by parents on revictimization of emotional maltreatment by peers targeting second-year students of middle school with depression and social withdrawal as mediating variables. To this end, those who experienced physical violence by parents or friends were excepted from panel data collected by National Youth Policy Institute (KCYPS) and data of 752 people who experienced emotional maltreatment by parents or peers were analyzed. Research hypotheses were verified by a utilizing structural equation model. The results can be summarized as follows: First, experiencing emotional maltreatment by parents has a direct impact on depression and social withdrawal. Second, it was found that depression has a direct impact on experiencing emotional maltreatment by peers while social withdrawal is significant in an indirect path affecting with depression as a mediating variable. Third, the multiple mediated effects of depression and social withdrawal were significant in the revictimization relationship between emotional maltreatment by parents and emotional maltreatment by peers. This means that emotional maltreatment by parents becomes a predictor in re-experiencing emotional maltreatment by peers. It also means that emotional maltreatment by parents has an indirect effect through psychological and emotional factors such as depression and social withdrawal rather than having a direct effect. Based on the results of this study, limitations of the study and suggestions for future research were discussed.

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Post-Traumatic Cognition Mediates the Relationship between a History of Sexual Abuse and the Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Sexual Assault Victims

  • Shin, Kyoung Min;Chung, Young Ki;Shin, Yee Jin;Kim, Miran;Kim, Nam Hee;Kim, Kyoung Ah;Lee, Hanbyul;Chang, Hyoung Yoon
    • Journal of Korean Medical Science
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    • v.32 no.10
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    • pp.1680-1686
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    • 2017
  • More than half of all sexual assault victims report experiencing sexual victimization more than once. The aim of this paper was to determine the role post-traumatic cognition plays in the relationship between a history of sexual abuse and post-traumatic stress symptoms in sexual assault victims. The relationship between a history of sexual assault and the severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms was investigated retrospectively using data from a sexual assault crisis center in Korea. Data on psychological symptoms were collected in person at the initial assessment and by telephone 1 month later using the Post-traumatic Cognitions Inventory and the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Scale: Self-report Version. Of 105 women included in the analysis, 10 (9.5%) reported prior sexual abuse and were classified as sexually revictimized. Revictimized women had more post-traumatic negative cognition at initial assessment (t = -2.98; P = 0.004) and more post-traumatic symptoms at 1 month follow-up (t = -2.39; P = 0.019) than singly victimized women. At 1 month follow-up, the severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms had increased in revictimized women but had decreased slightly in singly victimized women. Negative post-traumatic cognition fully mediated the association between a history of sexual abuse and the severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Early detection of sexually revictimized women and tailored service and treatment intervention is needed to better serve this group of victims. Interventions targeted at preventing revictimization or post crime victimization may also help victims recover from the trauma and prevent future abuse.