• Title, Summary, Keyword: Probiotic

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EFFECT OF PROBIOTIC SUPPLEMENTATION ON GROWTH RATE, RUMEN METABOLISM, AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY IN HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES

  • Windschitl, P.M.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.4 no.4
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    • pp.341-351
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    • 1991
  • Sixteen Holstein heifer calves were used in an 112-day trial to study the effects of probiotic supplementation on growth performance and rumen metabolism. Calves were divided into four groups of four calves each, with two groups receiving the probiotic supplement and two groups serving as controls. Calves were limited to 1.6 kg dry matter of a corn-barley based grain mix per day. Long-stem bromegrass hay was fed as forage the first 56 days and bromegrass silage the last 56 days of the trial. Probiotic (28 g/d/calf) was fed along with the grain mix twice daily. Data were analyzed for the entire trial and also for the separate hay and silage feeding periods. Total weight gain and average daily gain were not affected (p>.05) by probiotic supplementation. Dry matter intake was lower (p<.05) and feed efficiency (kg feed/kg weight gain) was improved slightly during the hay feeding period for the probiotic-supplemented calves. Wither height gain was greater (p<.05) during the hay period and lower (p<.05) during the silage period for probiotic-supplemented calves. Heart girth gain was improved (p<.07) by probiotic supplementation, particularly during the hay feeding period (p<.05). Total rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration was higher (p<.05) with the probiotic-supplemented calves. Molar proportions of individual VFA were not affected (p>.05). Rumen ammonia-N and plasma urea-N concentration were lower (p<.05) for probiotic-supplemented calves during the hay feeding period. Total tract nutrient digestibility was not affected (p>.05). Some improvements in animal performance and changes in rumen and blood metabolites were observed when calves were supplemented with probiotic. Effects due to probiotic supplementation were most pronounced during the hay feeding period.

Effect of Pre-Treatment Methods on the Measurement of Probiotic Cell Count (전처리 방법이 유산균수 측정에 미치는 영향)

  • Kang, Ju-Yeong;Lee, Seo-Hyun;Park, Eun-Ji;Kim, Jung-Beom
    • The Korean Journal of Food And Nutrition
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    • v.32 no.5
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    • pp.560-564
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    • 2019
  • The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of the pre-treatment method on the measurement of probiotic cell counts. The probiotic cell count was not significantly different in the pre-treatment method such as experimenters, diluted solution, medium, and homogenization duration. The mean value of probiotic cell count with capsule was $2.2{\times}10^{10}{\pm}9.5{\times}10^9CFU/g$. This probiotic cell count was converted into $2.8{\times}10^{10}{\pm}1.2{\times}10^{10}CFU/g$ based on the net weight. The mean value of probiotic cell count without capsules was $4.3{\times}10^{10}{\pm}1.8{\times}10^{10}CFU/g$. As a result of this comparison, probiotic cell count showed significant difference with and without capsules. Thus, it is suggested that the probiotic cell count is measured by removing the capsule in capsule probiotics.

Probiotic Functional Dairy Foods and Health Claims: an Overview

  • Jayaprakasha, Heddur M.;Yoon, Yoh-Chang;Paik, Hyun-Dong
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.14 no.4
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    • pp.523-528
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    • 2005
  • The commercial interests in functional foods containing probiotics are gaining significance in view of increasing studies on their role in digestive tract. Probiotic dairy foods containing health-promoting bacteria are important segment of functional food market. Various health benefits have been attributed to specific strains of lactic acid bacteria or food containing these probiotic cultures. Probiotic-containing foods are considered to improve general gut health and natural defenses of body, and lower blood cholesterol level. Specific probiotic microbes can alleviate or prevent diverse intestinal diarrhea-inducing disorders, cause prophylaxis of intestinal and urogenital infections, inhibit mutagenicity of intestinal contents, and reduce incidence of intestinal tumors. Recent increasing evidences on health effects of probiotics have triggered consumer interest in this category of functional foods. Rational approach needs to be applied in selection of strains for probiotic preparation to achieve required functionality. Present article focuses on some prominent probiotic candidates and criteria for their inclusion in functional food sector. Various health claims of probiotics on gastrointestinal disorders, anticarcinogenic effects, and anti-cholestrimic effects, and possible mechanistic explanations for their functionality are highlighted.

Utilization of Makgeolli sludge for growth of probiotic bacteria (Probiotic bacteria의 생장에 대한 막걸리슬러지의 이용)

  • Kim, Wan-Sub
    • Korean Journal of Agricultural Science
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    • v.38 no.3
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    • pp.473-477
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    • 2011
  • A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium (B) spp. Lactobacillus(L) acidophilus, and Lactococcus(Lc) cremoris. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Only a limited culture media for the test purpose of probiotic bacteria are commercially available (MRS broth), but the media for large-scale propagation of viable cells which are able to be used as food additive are not available. The manufacture of a low priced and preferred novel medium for probiotic bacteria was therefore, attempted using whey protein concentrate(WPC) and Makgeolli sludge as a starting material. The effect of WPC and Makgeolli sludge on the growth of four strains (B. bifidum 15696, B. longum 15707, L. acidophilus CH-2, and Lc. cremoris 20076) was investigated. Medium prepared such as WPC, Makgeolli sludge, and WPC+Makgeolli sludge(WPCMs). It was observed that the growth of 4 strains (B. bifidum 15696, B. longum 15707, L. acidophilus CH-2, and Lc. cremoris 20076) was stimulated by Makgeolli sludge, WPC, WPCMs. Especially, Viable cell number of 4 strains in the WPCMs were higher than that of the single media. These result suggest the possibility that Makgeolli and WPC, acts as a growth factor for the growth of probiotic bacteria.

Effect of Probiotic Inclusion in the Diet of Broiler Chickens on Performance, Feed Efficiency and Carcass Quality

  • Khaksefidi, A.;Rahimi, Sh.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.18 no.8
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    • pp.1153-1156
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    • 2005
  • An experiment was conducted with three hundred and twenty broiler chickens to evaluate the influence of supplementation of probiotic on growth, microbiological status and carcass quality of chickens. The probiotic contained similar proportions of six strains of variable organisms namely Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Aspergillus oryzae, Streptococcus faecium and Torulopsis sps and was fed at 100 mg/kg diet. The body weight and feed conversion of probiotic fed groups were superior (p<0.05) compared to the control group in the 4th, 5th and 6th weeks. The chickens fed the diet with probiotic had lower (p<0.05) numbers of coliforms and Campylobacter than chickens fed the control diet. All chickens' carcasses on the control diet were positive for Salmonella while only 16 of the 40 carcasses were positive from chickens fed diets containing probiotic. The leg and breast meat of probiotic fed chickens were higher (p<0.05) in moisture, protein and ash, and lower in fat as compared to the leg and breast meat of control chickens.

Effects of Probiotic and Prebiotic on Average Daily Gain, Fecal Shedding of Escherichia Coli, and Immune System Status in Newborn Female Calves

  • Roodposhti, Pezhman Mohamadi;Dabiri, Najafgholi
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.25 no.9
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    • pp.1255-1261
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    • 2012
  • Thirty two Holstein female calves (initial body weight = $40{\pm}3.0$ kg) were used to investigate the effects of probiotic and prebiotic on average daily gain (ADG), fecal E. coli count, white blood cell count, plasma IgG1 level and cell-mediated immune response to injection of phytohemagglutinin in suckling female calves. Calves were assigned randomly to one of the four treatments, including whole milk without additives (control), whole milk containing probiotic, whole milk containing prebiotic and whole milk containing probiotic and prebiotic (synbiotic). Average daily gain was greater in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic at weeks 6, 7 and 8 (p<0.05). E. coli count was significantly lower in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic on d 56 (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between treatments in blood samples and cell-mediated response. This study showed that addition of probiotic, prebiotic and combination of these additives to milk enhanced ADG and reduced fecal E. coli count in preruminant calves.

The Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Pg4 Strain on Intestinal Characteristics and Performance in Broilers

  • Yu, B.;Liu, J.R.;Chiou, M.Y.;Hsu, Y.R.;Chiou, W.S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.20 no.8
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    • pp.1243-1251
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    • 2007
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using L. reuteri Pg4, a strain isolated from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of healthy broilers, as a probiotic. In preliminary in vitro studies the Pg4 strain was proven capable of tolerating acid and bile salts, inhibiting pathogenic bacteria and can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells. The probiotic properties were then evaluated on the basis of the broiler's growth performance, intestinal microbial population and cecal volatile fatty acid and lactic acid concentrations under conventional feeding. Dietary supplementation of dried L. reuteri Pg4 decreased significantly feed intake in grower chickens and improved significantly the feed conversion by 5% in a 0-6 weeks feeding period compared with the control group. The Lactobacillus counts in the crop, ileum, and cecum of the probiotic group were higher than in the control group. The L. reuteri Pg4 strain was traceable in the GI tract of probiotic supplemented chicks and showed capability of survival in the intestine for a protracted period. The probiotic group had a higher lactic acid concentration and lower pH value in the cecum than the control chicks. Probiotic supplement also affected the histology of the intestinal mucosa of chicks. The present findings demonstrated that L. reuteri Pg4 possesses probiotic characteristics and it is suggested, therefore, that the organism could be a candidate for a new probiotic strain.

Effects of Dietary Bacillus-based Probiotic on Growth Performance, Nutrients Digestibility, Blood Characteristics and Fecal Noxious Gas Content in Finishing Pigs

  • Chen, Y.J.;Min, B.J.;Cho, J.H.;Kwon, O.S.;Son, K.S.;Kim, H.J.;Kim, I.H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.587-592
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    • 2006
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplementation with bacillus-based probiotic (Bacillus subtilis, $1.0{\times}10^7CFU/g$; Bacillus coagulans, $2.0{\times}10^6CFU/g$ and Lactobacillus acidophilus, $5.0{\times}10^6CFU/g$) on finishing pigs growth performance, nutrients digestibility, blood characteristics and fecal noxious gas content and to determine the optimal addition level of this probiotic preparation. A total of forty eight pigs with an initial body weight (BW) of $90.60{\pm}2.94kg$ were allotted to three dietary treatments (four pigs per pen with four pens per treatment) according to a randomized complete block design. Dietary treatment included: 1) CON (basal diet); 2) BP1 (basal diet+bacillus-based probiotic 0.1%) and 3) BP2 (basal diet+bacillus-based probiotic 0.2%). The experiment lasted 6 weeks. Through the entire experimental period, ADG was improved by 11% (p<0.05) in pigs fed diets supplemented with 0.2% bacillus-based probiotic compared to pigs fed the basal diet. ADFI and gain/feed were not affected by the treatments (p>0.05). Supplementation of bacillus-based probiotic did not affect either DM and N digestibilities or blood characteristics (p>0.05) of pigs. Fecal ammonia nitrogen ($NH_3$-N) measured at the end of experiment was reduced (p<0.05) when pigs were fed the diet with 0.2% bacillus-based probiotic. Fecal butyric acid concentration also decreased significantly (p<0.05) whereas acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations were not affected (p>0.05) when pigs were fed diets with added bacillus-based probiotic. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of bacillus-based probiotic can increase growth performance and decrease fecal noxious gas content concentration.

Improved Eradication Rate of Standard Triple Therapy by Adding Bismuth and Probiotic Supplement for Helicobacter pylori Treatment in Thailand

  • Srinarong, Chanagune;Siramolpiwat, Sith;Wongcha-um, Arti;Mahachai, Varocha;Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.22
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    • pp.9909-9913
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    • 2014
  • Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) remains an important cause of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease worldwide. Treatment of H. pylori infection is one of the effective ways to prevent gastric cancer. However, standard triple therapy for H. pylori eradication is no longer effective in many countries, including Thailand. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of adding bismuth and probiotic to standard triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. Materials and Methods: In this prospective single center study, H. pylori infected gastritis patients were randomized to receive 7- or 14-day standard triple therapy plus bismuth with probiotic or placebo. Treatment regimen consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole twice daily, 1 g amoxicillin twice daily, 1 g clarithromycin MR once daily and 1,048mg bismuth subsalicylate twice daily. Probiotic bacteria composed of Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus paracasei. Placebo was conventional drinking yogurt without probiotic. CYP2C19 genotyping and antibiotic susceptibility tests were also done. H pylori eradication was defined as a negative $^{13}C$-urea breath test at least 2 weeks after completion of treatment. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled (25 each to 7- and 14-day regimens with probiotic or placebo). Antibiotic susceptibility tests showed 36.7% metronidazole and 1.1% clarithromycin resistance. CYP2C19 genotyping revealed 40.8%, 49% and 10.2% were rapid, intermediate and poor metabolizers, respectively. The eradication rates of 7- or 14 regimens with probiotics were 100%. Regarding adverse events, the incidence of bitter taste was significantly lower in the 7- day regimen with the probiotic group compared with 7- day regimen with placebo (40% vs. 64%; p=0.04). Conclusions: The 7-day standard triple therapy plus bismuth and probiotic can provide an excellent cure rate of H. pylori (100%) in areas with low clarithromycin resistance such as Thailand, regardless of CYP2C19 genotype. Adding a probiotic also reduced treatment-related adverse events.

Screening and Characterization of Probiotic Strains for Prevention of Bacterial Fish Diseases (어류의 세균성 질병 예방을 위한 Probiotic균주의 선발 및 특성)

  • 허문수;양병규;전유진
    • Microbiology and Biotechnology Letters
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    • v.31 no.2
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    • pp.129-134
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    • 2003
  • The purpose of the present study was to screen the effective of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics, which are able to protect aquacultural fish pathogenic bacteria, and investigate their characterization. Twenty strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fish intestine, fermented fish foods and kimchis. These bacteria were screened for antagonistic activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Seven tested LAB strains were able to inhibit the fish pathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio anguillarum, Edwardsiella tarda, and Streptococcus sp.. Of the probiotic candidates, BK19 strain isolated from fermented pollack viscera indicated the largest inhibition activity. Moreover, this strain showed a resistance over low pH and antibiotic agents. Therefore this probiotic candidate BK19 was finally selected and identified as a probiotic strain. This particular probiotic bacteria was identified as Lactobacillus sakei BK19 by biochemical characteristics and 165 rRNA PCR amplification.