• Title, Summary, Keyword: Pork

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Preferences and Consumption Patterns of Consumer to Develop Processed Pork Products for Export

  • Seo, Sang-Hee;Kim, Eun-Mi;Kim, Young-Boong
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.32 no.1
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    • pp.18-23
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    • 2012
  • This study was conducted to survey the perception of domestic consumers about traditional pork dishes, and to utilize the survey result as a basis for the development of processed pork products. A survey was conducted on 218 domestic consumers regarding the following: general questions, propensity and preference to consume pork dishes, pork dishes feasible for export, and the types and problems of processed products feasible for export. The results of the survey showed that the respondents consumed pork dishes 3-4 times a month on average and they appeared to consume the pork dishes most frequently in specialized restaurants. The highest preference was shown in Samgyeopasal gui (grilled pork belly) and Galbi gui (grilled pork rib) among the pork dishes, whereas the lowest preference was shown in Kkubdegi gui (grilled pork skin) and Gookbob (boiled rice and pork served in soup). When the type of processed pork products available according to pork dishes were analyzed, the result showed that Samgyeopasal gui (grilled pork belly) and Nirbiani (slices of roast, seasoned pork in width) could be developed as a frozen product, Geyook Bokeum (stir-fried spicy pork), Bulgogi (Korean-style barbecued pork), and Galbi jjim (braised short ribs) could be developed as a retort product, and that Bossam (boiled pork eaten with a salty sauce and wrapped in greens), Pyeonyuk (slices of boiled pork), Jokbal (pork trotters), and Sundae (kneading together seasoned mixture of vegetables and glass noodles stuffing it into casings made of hog intestines, which are then tied off at the ends and boiled) could be developed as a vacuum-packed product. When the survey concerning the problems expected in the development of processed products using pork dishes was conducted, the result showed that there could be a texture change issue for Galbi gui, Samgyeopasal gui and Nirbiani; a preservation issue for Bossam, Pyeonyuk; a safety issue for Bulgogi and Geyook Bokeum; a taste and flavor change issue for Geyook Bokeum and Sundae; and a packaging issue for Gookbob.

Comparison of Physicochemical Properties between Standard and Sow Pork

  • Kim, Gye-Woong;Kim, Hack-Youn
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.38 no.5
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    • pp.1120-1130
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    • 2018
  • This study was conducted to investigate the dressing percentage and physicochemical characteristics, such as fatty acid composition, water holding capacity (WHC), shear force, meat color, cooking loss, and sensory evaluation, of experimental pork obtained from a total of 12 standard pigs and sows. The water content of tenderloin (73.38%) was the highest in standard pork (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference in crude protein content was shown between standard pork and sow pork (p<0.05). There were significant differences between standard pork and sow pork in shear forces of loin and tenderloin (p<0.01). There was a significant difference in WHC between standard pork and sow pork in loin, tenderloin, and hind legs (p<0.05). The CIE $L^*$ and CIE $b^*$ values of standard loin were significantly higher than those of sow loin (p<0.05). The CIE $a^*$ values of sow loin were significantly higher than those of standard loin (p<0.05). The contents of arachidonic acid for standard pork and sow pork were 0.33% and 0.84%, respectively (p<0.05). However, there was no difference in the total content of unsaturated fatty acid between the two groups. There were no significant differences between standard pork and sow pork after sensory evaluation, except for color and tenderness. The overall acceptability of standard pork was significantly higher than that of sow pork (p<0.05).

Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters

  • Choi, Yun-Sang;Hwang, Ko-Eun;Kim, Hyun-Wook;Song, Dong-Heon;Jeon, Ki-Hong;Park, Jong-Dae;Sung, Jung-Min;Kim, Young-Boong;Kim, Cheon-Jei
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.36 no.4
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    • pp.445-451
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    • 2016
  • The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those in the control. When the concentration of pork head meat was increased from 0% to 20%, cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, fat separation, and pH of frankfurters were increased, while the lightness, redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of frankfurters were decreased. Ash contents, cohesiveness, color, and tenderness of sensory characteristics of frankfurters added with different amounts of pork meat or pork head meat were not significantly (p>0.05) different from those of the control or there treatments. Frankfurters in T4 (frankfurter with 30% pork meat + 20% pork head) had the lowest (p<0.05) hardness and gumminess. The hardness and gumminess of frankfurters in other treatments were not significantly different (p>0.05) from that in the control. Frankfurters with higher pork head meat concentrations had lower flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability scores. Therefore, replacing pork meat with pork head meat in the formulation could successfully produce results similar to those of control frankfurters. The best results were obtained when 10% pork head meat was used to replace pork meat.

Sensory and Nutritional Characteristics of Stuffed Pork Cutlet with Kimchi, Pineapple, and Seasoned Small Green Onion (김치, 파무침, 파인애플을 첨가한 기능성 돈까스의 관능적 및 영양적 평가)

  • 한경수;전효진;김영복;이종훈
    • Culinary science and hospitality research
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.217-226
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    • 2002
  • Stuffed pork cutlets were prepared by adding kimchi, pineapple, and seasoned green onion, and they were analyzed to measure sensory and nutritional characteristics. Sensory evaluation means of stuffed pork cutlet with kimchi, pineapple and seasoned small green onion was significantly higher than means of control pork cutlet especially for appearance after cutting, tenderness of meat, tenderness of stuffing, moistureless of stuffing, balance of meat and stuffing, flavor before taste, and flavor after taste. Dietary fiber, Vit. A, and Vit. C of kimchi pork cutlet was higher than them of control pork cutlet and frozen pork cutlet Dietary fiber, K and Vit. C of pineapple pork cutlet was higher than them of control pork cutlet. And Dietary fiber, Vit Ca, and P contents of pineapple pork cutlet was higher than them of frozen pork cutlet. Vit. A, $\beta$-carotene, dietary fiber, Ca, and P contents of seasoned small green onion pork cutlet was higher than them of control pork cutlet and frozen cutlet.

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Pork Preference for Consumers in China, Japan and South Korea

  • Oh, S.H.;See, M.T.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.25 no.1
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    • pp.143-150
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    • 2012
  • Competition in global pork markets has increased as trade barriers have opened as a result of free trade agreements. Japanese prefer both loin and Boston butt, while Chinese prefer pork offal. Frozen pork has increased in terms of imports into China. Japanese consumers consider pork meat origin along with pork price when making purchase decisions. While the Chinese prefer a strong tasting pork product, South Korean consumers show very strong preferences to pork that is higher in fat. Therefore, South Korean consumers have a higher demand for pork belly and Boston butt. Consequently, the supply and demand of pork in Korea is hardly met, which means that importation of high fat parts is inevitable. In Korea there is lower preference toward low fat parts such as loin, picnic shoulder, and ham. During the economic depression in South Korea there have been observable changes in consumer preferences. There remains steep competition among the pork exporting countries in terms of gaining share in the international pork market. If specific consumer preferences would be considered carefully, there is the possibility to increase the amount of pork exported to these countries.

A Study on the Pork Market Analysis of Mongolia and the Continuous Export Possibility of Korean Pork (몽골 돼지고기 시장 분석 및 수출 지속 가능성)

  • Kwak, Young-Tai
    • Korean Journal of Food Preservation
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    • v.12 no.5
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    • pp.507-510
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    • 2005
  • This study was carried out to analyze the pork market of Mongolia and to find the continuous export possibility of Korean pork. The main results are as follows; First, pork consumption in Mongolia relies on import because pork production is not sufficient and pork price is high compared to beef or sheep meat. Second, Korean pork parts for export to Mongolia are pork fat and rear leg. Third, the authorities concerned have to keep a good relationship between Korean pork market and Mongolian pork market to export Korean pork to Mongolia when Korea pig farming is in depression.

Effect of Added Drip on Quality and Shelf Life of Pork Sausage (드립 첨가가 돈육 소시지의 품질 및 저장성에 미치는 영향)

  • 문윤희;김종기;정인철
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.20 no.2
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    • pp.133-138
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    • 2000
  • This study was carried out to investigate the effect of drip addition on quality and sensory characteristics of pork sausage. The pH of pork sausage was not affected by addition of nitrite or drip. Hunter's "a" value of pork sausage nitrite added was higher than pork sausage none added nitrite. The remained content of nitrite in nitrite added pork sausage was not over the permitted value(70ppm). The hardness, springiness, chewiness and brittleness of pork sausage added drip was higher than pork sausage none added drip. The free amino acid content was higher in pork sausage prepared by addition of nitrite and drip. The sensory value was not different between samples. The VBN, TBARS and total plate count during storage was low in pork sausage prepared by addition on nitrite. There, the drip was desirable to use in preparation of meat product.

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Pork Production in China, Japan and South Korea

  • Oh, S.H.;Whitley, N.C.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.11
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    • pp.1629-1636
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    • 2011
  • Global pork markets are becoming more competitive, riding the wind of the bilateral free trade agreement. China is the world's largest pork producer with nearly 50% of the world's total production. China's fast growing economy has provided its people with higher purchasing power, resulting in a rapid expansion of the Chinese swine industry over the past decades. Worldwide, China consumes the greatest amount of pork and it is believed that this trend will continue. Japan is the world's largest pork importing country, even though it also produces a lot of pork. The Japanese swine industry encounters weighty obstacles in production costs and environmental limitations which result in reduced domestic supply and creates the situation in which Japan has to import a significant amount of pork for their consumption. South Korea is also a large buyer of pork, with a status greatly influenced by the struggle that the country has faced with Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) which occurred in 2000, 2002 and 2010. High production costs, low production efficiency, and forced culling following the FMD outbreak resulted in the loss of many hog farming households in the country, reducing supply of domestic pork in the face of continued demand. Overall, pork production in these economically important countries can greatly impact the industry globally. The goal of this review paper is to describe pork production in China, Japan, and South Korea and discuss these countries' role in global pork export markets.

Quality Improvement of Effective Microorganisms (EM) Pork Produced by Using EM (유용미생물(Effective Microorganisms; EM)로 사양한 EM Pork의 육질 개선 효과)

  • Han, Seung-Kwan
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.34 no.5
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    • pp.734-737
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    • 2005
  • This study was conducted to determine the effect of effective microorganism (EM) treatment in feeding system of swine on carcass characteristics. EM pork, which reared with EM additives and EM activated liquids, and conventional pork (non-EM pork) were stored at $4^{\circ}C$. Chemical composition and storage stability of EM pork were compared with conventional pork. Cholesterol content at EM pork was 71 mg/100 g, which is lower than that of conventional pork (83 mg/100 g) when the meats were stored at $4^{\circ}C$ refrigerator. And EM pork (0.165 MDA mg/kg) showed higher antioxidant effect than control pork (0.184 MDA mg/kg). And also protein denaturalization at EM pork showed lower rate $(3.19\;mg\%)$ than that of conventional pork $(4.9\;mg\%)$ when the meats were stored at $4^{\circ}C$ refrigerator, showing that inhibitory effect of protein denaturalization was increased up to $35\%$ over the conventional pork. These results show that the EM pork had superior traits in terms of cholesterol level, lipid oxidation and protein denaturalization to the conventional pork.

Characterization of Restructured Meat Products Manufactured with PSE Pork Hams as Compared to Those with Normal Pork Counterparts (정상육과 PSE 돈육으로 제조된 재구성 육제품의 품질 특성)

  • Mueller, Wolf-Detrich;Koo B. Chin
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.23 no.4
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    • pp.321-326
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    • 2003
  • The objectives of this study were to develop restructured meat products(RMPs) using a transgluta-minase(TGase) and to improve the textural characteristics of RMPs manufactured with pale, soft, exudative(PSE) pork hams. The pH values of RMPs with PSE and normal pork were 5.94 and 6.07, respectively, and their water activity value was approximately 0.981. The RMPs had 70∼72% moisture, 4∼5% fat, 19∼20% protein, and approximately 3% ash contents. No differences in pH, water activity, chemical composition, and hunter color values were observed between RMPs manufactured with normal and PSE pork(p>0.05). However, RMPs containing PSE pork hams had higher drip loss(%)(p>0.05) than those with normal pork hams after 10 days of refrigerated storage. Although no differences were observed in the texture profile analysis(TPA) hardness and sensory evaluation, RMPs with PSE pork hams tended to have more pores and lower binding capacity those with normal pork. This result indicated that additional substrates or longer tumbling time(>4 hr) for the manufacture of RMPs containing PSE pork were required for the products to have similar palatability to those with normal pork.