• Title, Summary, Keyword: North East India

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Screening of 185DelAG, 1014DelGT and 3889DelAG BRCA1 Mutations in Breast Cancer Patients from North-East India

  • Hansa, Jagadish;Kannan, Ravi;Ghosh, Sankar Kumar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.11
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    • pp.5871-5874
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    • 2012
  • Around 1.35 million people of worldwide suffer from breast cancer each year, whereas in India, 1 in every 17 women develops the disease. Mutations of the Breast Cancer 1 (BRCA1) gene account for the majority of breast/ovarian cancer families. The purpose of study was to provide a prevalence of BRCA1 germline mutations in the North-East Indian population. In relation to the personal and family history with the breast cancer, we found mutations in 6.25% and 12.5% respectively. Three mutations, 185DelAG, 1014DelGT and 3889DelAG, were observed in our North-East Indian patients in exons 2 and 11, resulting in truncation of the BRCA1 protein by forming stop codons individually at amino acid positions 39, 303 and 1265. Our results point to a necessity for an extensive mutation screening study of high risk breast cancer cases in our North-East Indian population, which will provide better decisive medical and surgical preventive options.

Cancer: Scenario and Relationship of Different Geographical Areas of the Globe with Special Reference to North East-India

  • Sharma, Jagannath Dev;Kalit, Manoj;Nirmolia, Tulika;Saikia, Sidhartha Protim;Sharma, Arpita;Barman, Debanjana
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.8
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    • pp.3721-3729
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    • 2014
  • Background: Cancer is becoming the most important public health burden around the globe. As per the GLOBOCAN 2008 estimates, about 12.7 million cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2008. The burden of cancer cases for India in the year 2020 is calculated to be 1,148,757 (male 534,353; female 614,404) compared to 979,786 in 2010. The pattern of cancer incidence is varying among geographical regions, esophageal cancer for example being high in China, lung cancer in USA, and gallbladder cancer in Chile. The question remains why? Is it due to the diversity in genome pool, food habits, risk factor association and role of genetic susceptibility or some other factors associated with it? In India, the North East (NE)-India region is seeing a marked increase in cancer incidence and deaths, with a very different cancer incidence pattern compared to mainland India. The genome pool of the region is also quite distinct from the rest of India. Northeastern tribes are quite distinct from other groups; they are more closely related to East Asians than to other Indians. In this paper an attempt was made to see whether there is any similarity among the pattern of cancer incidence cases for different sites of NE-India region to South or East-Asia. Materials and Methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA), Pearson Correlation coefficient test was assessed to evaluate the linkage of North-East India region to other regions. A p value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The results clearly shows that there are similarities in occurrence of cancer incidence patterns for various cancer sites of NE-India with South and East-Asian regions, which may lead to the conclusion that there might be a genetic linkage between these regions.

Nested Multiplex PCR Based Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Carcinoma Patients of North- East India

  • Das, Debabrata;Rai, Avdhesh Kumar;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Barmon, Debabrata;Deka, Pankaj;Sharma, Jagannath Dev;Sarma, Anupam;Shrivastava, Sushruta;Bhattacharyya, Mouchumee;Kalita, Apurba Kumar;Sharma, Mousumi;Ahmed, Shiraj
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.785-790
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    • 2013
  • Background: Persistent infection of one or more of about 15 high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs), most commonly HPV types 16/18, has a significant role in cervical cancer initiation and progression. There are limited data available from north-east India about HPV prevalence though this region has high incidence rates of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV genotypes prevalent in cervical cancer patients of north-east India. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 107 cervical cancer patient samples. Nested multiplex PCR assays were employed for detection of 13 high risk and 5 low risk HPV types. Results: HPV was confirmed in 105 samples. The presence of 6 'carcinogenic' HPV types, HPV-16 (88%), -18 (15%), -31(4%),-45 (3%), -59 (4%), -58(1%), and one non carcinogenic, HPV-6/11 (6%), was recorded. Among various demographic and clinical factors only tumour stage showed a statistically significant association with HPV type infection (P=0.019). Conclusions: We suggest that the most prevalent genotype is HPV-16 followed by HPV-18 in cervical carcinoma patients of the north-eastern region of India. Advanced tumour stage may be associated with increased possibility of harbouring multiple HPV genotypes.

Overview of Childhood Cancers at a Regional Cancer Centre in North-East India

  • Hazarika, Munlima;Krishnatreya, Manigreeva;Bhuyan, Cidananda;Saikia, Bhargab Jyoti;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Nandy, Pintu;Hazarika, Monalisha;Roy, Partha Sarathi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.18
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    • pp.7817-7819
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    • 2014
  • Childhood cancers are relatively uncommon in comparison to adult cancers. There is no literature available to shed light on clinic-pathological types and patterns of care for childhood cancers in our population in North-East India. In this analysis we therefore tried to determine the common childhood cancers diagnosed in our institute, clinical profile of the patients, types of treatment and compliance, and median survival estimates. Leukemia was most common, followed by retinoblastoma, central nervous system tumours and lymphomas. Ascertaining the clinic-pathological profile of childhood cancers in our population is essential for allocation and management of resources for this small but important group of patients.

Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of seed oil plants of North-East India: A review

  • Saha, Priyanka;Talukdar, Anupam Das;Ningthoujam, Sanjoy Singh;Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta;Nath, Deepa;Nahar, Lutfun;Sarker, Satyajit Dey;Basar, Norazah
    • CELLMED
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    • v.5 no.3
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    • pp.17.1-17.22
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    • 2015
  • Apart from being used as food, seed oils have also been used traditionally as medicinal products by several communities. However, the full medicinal potential of many seed oil plants is yet to be properly reviewed, particularly for their antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. North-East India has rich resources of seed oil plants. The availability of detailed information on these plants is quite limited. This review aims to explore and evaluate these seed oil plants of the North-East India with particular emphasis on their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities as well as chemical compositions. A comprehensive literature search on seed oil plants of this region has been performed. Seed oil yielding plants of this region can be categorized into two categories: plants that are used traditionally as sources of edible or medicinal oils and plants that are used for purposes other than as sources of oils. Many seed oil plants of this region have been reported to possess antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and to produce various types of compounds. This review also highlights the importance of these plants in contributing to the local as well as the national economy of India.

Community Based Intervention for Tobacco Cessation: A Pilot Study Experience, North East India

  • Bhagabaty, Srabana Misra;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Kalita, Manoj;Salkar, Shekhar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.811-814
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    • 2015
  • Background: North East India has a high prevalence of tobacco consumption, but only few individuals seek help for tobacco cessation. Impact of community based tobacco cessation intervention in this part needs more research. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done on the dataset from a community-based tobacco cessation intervention pilot project conducted in Guwahati metro during 2009-10. Subjects, both male and female tobacco users, age > 15 years, permanent residents of these blocks giving consent were included in the study. Results: The sample was 800 tobacco users, of whom 25% visited any health care provider during last 12 months and 3% received tobacco cessation advice. An 18% quit rate was observed at six weeks follow up, more than the National average, with a 47% quit rate at eight months, while 52% of subjects reduced use. Conclusions: Higher tobacco quit rate and reduced tobacco use, no loss to follow up and negligible relapse was observed with this community based intervention design. Such designs should be given more emphasis for implementation in specified communities with very high tobacco consumption rates, cultural acceptance of tobacco and less motivation towards quitting.

Descriptive Epidemiology of Common Female Cancers in the North East India - a Hospital Based Study

  • Krishnatreya, Manigreeva;Kataki, Aamal Chandra;Sharma, Jagannath Dev;Nandy, Pintu;Talukdar, Abhijit;Gogoi, Gayatri;Hoque, Nazmul
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.24
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    • pp.10735-10738
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    • 2015
  • Background: Cancers of the breast, uterine cervix and ovary are common cancers amongst females of North East India. Not much is known about the descriptive epidemiology of these cancers in our population. The present retrospective analysis was therefore performed. Materials and Methods: The data set available at the hospital based cancer registry of a regional cancer center of North-East India, containing information on patients registered during the period of January 2010 to December 2012, was applied. A total of 2,925 cases of breast, uterine cervix and ovarian cancer were identified. Results: Of the total, 1,295 (44.3%) were breast cancers, 1,214 (41.5%) were uterine cervix and 416 (14.2%) ovarian cancer, median age (range) for breast, uterine cervix and ovary were 45 (17-85), 48 (20-91) and 45 years (7-80), respectively. Some 43.5% of cases with uterine cervix patients were illiterate, 5.4% and 5.7% stage I in breast and cervix respectively and 96.4% of ovarian cancers in advanced stage. Conclusions: Improvement of female education can contribute to increase the proportion of early stage diagnosis of breast and uterine cervix in our population. Any population-based intervention for the detection of cancers of breast, uterine cervix and ovarian cancer should be started early in our population.

Brief Descriptive Epidemiology of Primary Malignant Brain Tumors from North-East India

  • Krishnatreya, Manigreeva;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Sharma, Jagannath Dev;Bhattacharyya, Mouchumee;Nandy, Pintu;Hazarika, Munlima
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.22
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    • pp.9871-9873
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    • 2014
  • Brain tumors are a mixed group of neoplasms that originate from the intracranial tissues and the meninges with degrees of malignancy varying greatly from benign to aggressive. Not much is known about the epidemiology of primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) in our population in North-East India. In this analysis, an attempt was made to identify the age groups, gender distribution, topography and different histological types of PMBT with data from a hospital cancer registry. A total of 231 cases of PMBT were identified and included for the present analysis. Our analysis has shown that most of PMBT occur at 20-60 years of age, with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Some 70.5% of cases occurred in cerebral lobes except for the occipital lobe, and astrocytic tumors were the most common broad histological type. In our population the prevalence of PMBT is 1% of all cancers, mostly affecting young and middle aged patients. As brain tumors are rare, so case-control analytic epidemiological studies will be required to establish the risk factors prevalent in our population.

Hybrid Capture 2 Assay Based Evaluation of High-Risk HPV Status in Healthy Women of North-East India

  • Rai, Avdhesh Kumar;Das, Debabrata;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Barmon, Debabrata;Aggarwal, Dippy;Deka, Pankaj;Shrivastava, Sushruta;Sharma, Jagannath Dev;Sarma, Anupam;Baruah, Upasana;Sharma, Mousumi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.2
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    • pp.861-865
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    • 2014
  • Background: High risk HPV (HR-HPV) testing has been recommended as an effective tool along with cytology screening in identification of cervical intraepithelial lesions (CINs) and prevention of their progress towards invasive cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the HR-HPV DNA status by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay in healthy asymptomatic women of North-East India. Materials and Methods: This study examined cervical cell samples of forty three (n=43) healthy women by HC2 assay. A High Risk HPV DNA kit (Qiagen) was used which can detect 13 high risk HPV types: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 68. Results: The mean relative light units (RLU) for samples was in the range of 141-5, 94, 619. HR-HPV DNA was confirmed in 16% (7/43) of participant women samples. Among demographic and clinical parameters, menstrual irregularity (p=0.039) and infection history (p=0.028) has shown statistically significant differences between the HR-HPV-positive and negative groups. In the HR-HPV positive group, two women were confirmed for CINs after colposcopy and histopathologic examination. Conclusions: We suggest that there may be an association between irregular menstruation and infection history of the urogenital tract with HR-HPV DNA prevalence in North-East Indian asymptomatic women. HC2 assay can be a valuable tool for HR-HPV screening.

Genetic Variability Based on Tandem Repeat Numbers in a Genomic Locus of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' Prevalent in North East India

  • Singh, Yanglem Herojit;Sharma, Susheel Kumar;Sinha, Bireswar;Baranwal, Virendra Kumar;Singh, N. Bidyananda;Chanu, Ngathem Taibangnganbi;Roy, Subhra S.;Ansari, Meraj A.;Ningombam, Arati;Devi, Ph. Sobita;Das, Ashis Kumar;Singh, Salvinder;Singh, K. Mamocha;Prakash, Narendra
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.35 no.6
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    • pp.644-653
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    • 2019
  • The genetic variability of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) population associated with huanglongbing (HLB) disease of citrus in North Eastern (NE) region of India, a geographically locked region, and home for the diversity of many citrus species was analyzed on the basis of tandem repeat numbers (TRN) in variable CLIBASIA_01645 genomic loci. Fifty-five CLas strains sampled from different groves of NE Hill (NEH) region of India were in single amplicon group, but there was remarkable genetic variability in TRNs. The TRN in HLB-associated CLas strains varied from 0-21 and two novel repeat motifs were also identified. Among the NE population of CLas, TRN5 and TRN9 were most frequent (total frequency of 36.36%) followed by TRN4 (14.55%) and TRN6, TNR7 with a frequency of 12.73% each. Class II type CLas genotypes (5 < TRN ≤ 10) had highest prevalence (frequency of 60.00%) in the samples characterized in present study. Class I (TRN ≤ 5) genotypes were second highest prevalent (29.09%) in the NEH region. Further analysis of genetic diversity parameters using Nei's measure (H value) indicated wide genetic diversity in the CLas strains of NE India (H value of 0.58-0.86). Manipur CLas strains had highest genetic variability (0.86) as compared to Eastern, Southern and Central India. The R10 values (TRN ≤ 10/TRN > 10) of NE CLas population was 10.43 (73/7), higher from other regions of India. Present study conclusively reported the occurrence of high genetic variability in TRN of CLas population in North East Indian citrus groves which have evolved to adapt to the specific ecological niche.