• Title, Summary, Keyword: Nasopharyngeal neoplasm

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Nasopharyngeal Cancer with Temporomandibular Disorder and Neurologic Symptom: A Case Report

  • Hong, Jung-Hun;Kwon, Jeong-Seung;Ahn, Hyung-Joon;Kim, Seong-Taek;Choi, Jong-Hoon
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.26-28
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    • 2014
  • Nasopharyngeal cancer is malignant tumor of nasopharyngeal area that is characterized of lymphadenopathy, pain, otitis media, hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy and may present symptoms similar to temporomandibular disorder such as facial pain and trismus. In this case, the patient with symptoms similar to temporomandibular disorder after surgery for otitis media presented with facial paresthesia and masticatory muscle weakness. Examinaion of trigemimal nerve was shown sensory and motor abnormaility. The patient was referred to a neurologist. Nasopharyngeal cancer was suspected on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and was confirmed by biopsy. If the patient presenting with paresthesia and muscle weakness the cranial nerve examination should be performed regardless of typical temporomandibular disorder symptom. The neurologic symptom can be caused by neoplasm such as brain tumor and nasopharyngeal cancer. Nasopharyngeal cancer on rosenmuller fossa can develop otitis media. Therefore, the patient with otitis media history should be consulted to otorhinolaryngologist to examin the nasopharyngeal area.

A Case of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Metastatic Axillary Node after Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy (치료 후 액와 림프절의 전이를 보인 비인강암 1례)

  • Hong, Hyun-Jun;Lee, Won-Il;Park, Mi-Na;Chung, Eun-Ji;Kim, Yong-Tai;Choi, Eun-Chang
    • Korean Journal of Head & Neck Oncology
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    • v.25 no.1
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    • pp.43-46
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    • 2009
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinomas are epithelial neoplasm derived from nasopharyngeal mucosa. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma involved cervical lymph nodes frequently. However, nasopharyngeal carcinoma with metastatic axillary node after concurrent chemoradiotherapy was reported rarely. We report the patients who was a 34-year-old man diagnosed as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. He was treated by concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. But axillary node metastasis was found after treatment in 2 years. After surgical resection of axillary lymph node, there is no evidence of disease.

Prognostic Factors on Overall Survival of Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

  • Li, Jia-Xin;Huang, Shao-Min;Wen, Bi-Xiu;Lu, Tai-Xiang
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.7
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    • pp.3169-3173
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    • 2014
  • Background: To investigate factors associated with overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and two consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed nasopharyngeal carcinoma with distant metastasis at diagnosis seen between December 2007 and May 2011 were reviewed. Patient, tumor and treatment factors were analyzed for their significance regarding overall survival. Results: The median follow-up time was 22 months. At the time of this report, 116 patients had died. For 112 patients, cause of death was nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The 1, 2, 3, and 4-year overall survival rates were 75.6%, 50.2%, 39.2%, and 28.2%, respectively. Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that T-stage (p=0.045), N-stage (p=0.014), metastasis number (p<0.001) and radiotherapy for nasopharynx and neck (p<0.001) were significant factors for overall survival. Conclusions: Early T-stage and N-stage, solitary metastasis in a single organ were good prognostic factors for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Radiotherapy should be strongly recommended in systemic treatment.

Tumor volume/metabolic information can improve the prognostication of anatomy based staging system for nasopharyngeal cancer? Evaluation of the 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC staging system for nasopharyngeal cancer

  • Jeong, Yuri;Lee, Sang-wook
    • Radiation Oncology Journal
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    • v.36 no.4
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    • pp.295-303
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: We evaluated prognostic value of the 8th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union for Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) staging system for nasopharyngeal cancer and investigated whether tumor volume/metabolic information refined prognostication of anatomy based staging system. Materials and Methods: One hundred thirty-three patients with nasopharyngeal cancer who were staged with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) between 2004 and 2013 were reviewed. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate prognostic value of the 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC staging system and other factors including gross tumor volume and maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (GTV-T and SUV-T). Results: Median follow-up period was 63 months. In multivariate analysis for overall survival (OS), stage group (stage I-II vs. III-IVA) was the only significant prognostic factor. However, 5-year OS rates were not significantly different between stage I and II (100% vs. 96.2%), and between stage III and IVA (80.1% vs. 71.7%). Although SUV-T and GTV-T were not significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis, those improved prognostication of stage group. The 5-year OS rates were significantly different between stage I-II, III-IV (SUV-T ≤ 16), and III-IV (SUV-T > 16) (97.2% vs. 78% vs. 53.8%), and between stage I, II-IV (GTV-T ≤ 33 mL), and II-IV (GTV-T > 33 mL) (100% vs. 87.3% vs. 66.7%). Conclusion: Current anatomy based staging system has limitations on prognostication for nasopharyngeal cancer despite the most accurate assessment of tumor extent by MRI. Tumor volume/metabolic information seem to improve prognostication of current anatomy based staging system, and further studies are needed to confirm its clinical significance.

Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Incidence in North Tunisia: Negative Trends in Adults but not Adolescents, 1994-2006

  • Wided, Ben Ayoub Hizem;Hamouda, Boussen;Hamadi, Hsairi;Mansour, Ben Abdallah
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.7
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    • pp.2653-2657
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    • 2015
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the second most common neoplasm of head and neck in Tunisia. The distribution is bimodal with a first period occurrence between 15 and 20 years old and a second peak at around 50 years of age. Undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharynx type III (UCNT) is the predominant histological type (93.4%). Data of cancer registry of North Tunisia confirmed that it is an intermediate risk area for NPC with overall ASRs of 3.6 and 1.6/100,000 respectively in males and females. This study aimed to present the evolution of incidence rate of nasopharyngeal carcinoma over a period of 12 years (1994-2006). Data of cancer registry of North Tunisia (NTCR), covering half of the Tunisian population, were used to determine evolution of NPC incidence, calculated by 5 year periods. The estimated annual percentage change (EAPC) was used as an estimate of the trend. To best summarize the behavior or the data trend across years, we used a join-point regression program. Between 1994 and 2006, we observed negative annual average change of standardized incidence in men and women (-3.3%and -2.7%) also for the standardized incidences which showed a rather important decline (26.4% in males and 22.3% in females). The truncated age standardized incidence rate of NPC in adults aged of 30 years old and more (N= 1209) decreased by -0.4% per year from 1994 to 2006 over time in north Tunisia dropping from 6.09 to 4.14 person-years. However, the rate was relatively stable during this period among youths aged 0-29 years (N= 233) in both sexes. NPC demonstrated a favorable evolution from 1994-2006 probably due to a improvement in socioeconomic conditions.

Clinicopathological Features of Low-Grade Thyroid-like Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma

  • Li, Minhua;Wei, Jiangguo;Yao, Xiaofei;Wang, Cheng
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
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    • v.49 no.1
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    • pp.213-218
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    • 2017
  • Purpose Primary low-grade thyroid-like papillary adenocarcinomas are extremely rare neoplasms that generally originate in the nasopharynx. Here, we describe a novel case of a 15-year-old Chinese girl who was diagnosed with low-grade thyroid-like papillary adenocarcinoma, including a brief review of the literature to reveal the clinicopathological features of low-grade thyroid-like nasopharyngeal papillary adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of pan-cytokeratin (CKpan), cytokeratin (CK) 7, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), thyroglobulin, CD15, S100, P40, CK20, CDX-2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and Ki-67. Additionally, in situ hybridization investigation was utilized to identify the presence of small Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNA. Results Histopathological analysis revealed florid proliferation of papillary structures lined by columnar epithelial cells with fibrovascular cores. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive for CKpan, CK7, TTF-1, vimentin, and EMA, but negative for thyroglobulin, CD15, S100, P40, CK20, CDX-2, and GFAP. The Ki-67-labeling index reached 5% in the most concentrated spot. In situ hybridization for EBV was negative. Conclusion Due to the distinct rarity of low-grade thyroid-like papillary adenocarcinomas with a favorable clinical outcome, a nationwide effort to raise public awareness of this neoplasm is required.

A Case of Neck Soft Tissue Infection in Patient with Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Misdiagnosed as Local Progression during External Radiotherapy (비인두암 환자에서 방사선 치료중 암의 국소진행으로 오인된 경부 연조직 감염 1례)

  • Lee So-Yeon;Im So-Hi;Choi Hyun-Cheul;Kim Sung-Hwan;Jun Jung-Soo;Back Joon-Hyun;Yoo Jin-Young;Noh He-Il;Kim Hoon-Kyo
    • Korean Journal of Head & Neck Oncology
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.216-218
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    • 2002
  • A 38-year-old man, who was diagnosed nasopharyngeal carcinoma (stage T4N2Mx) had rapidly growing lower neck mass (at level IV area) with local inflammation sign during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. After we performed Color Doppler sonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of the neck mass, we differentiated neck soft tissue infection from tumor extension. Size of the mass decreased after antibiotics therapy. It was difficult to differentiate neck infection from tumor progression during treatment in naspharyngeal carcinoma.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Detected Intracranial Extension in the T4 Classification Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

  • Cao, Caineng;Luo, Jingwei;Gao, Li;Yi, Junlin;Huang, Xiaodong;Li, Suyan;Xiao, Jianping;Zhang, Zhong;Xu, Guozhen
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
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    • v.49 no.2
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    • pp.518-525
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    • 2017
  • Purpose This study was conducted is to identify the prognostic value and staging categories of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected intracranial extension in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to determine whether it is necessary to subclassify the T4 classification NPC. Materials and Methods A total of 335 nonmetastatic T4 classification NPC patients with MRI treated between March 2004 and June 2011 by radical IMRT were included. The T4 classification patients were sub-classified into two grades (T4a, without intracranial extension vs. T4b, with intracranial extension) according to the site of invasion. Results The frequency of intracranial extension was 40.9% (137 of 335 patients). Multivariate analysis identified subclassification (T4a vs. T4b) as an independent prognostic factor for local failure-free survival (p=0.049; hazard ratio [HR], 0.498) and overall survival (p=0.004; HR, 0.572); however, it had no effect on regional failure-free survival or distant failure-free survival (p > 0.050). Conclusion For patients with T4 classification NPC, those with MRI-detected intracranial extension are more likely to experience local failure and death after IMRT than patients without intracranial extension. According to the site of invasion, subclassification of T4 patients as T4a or T4b has prognostic value in NPC.

Temporomandibular Disorder Caused by Nasopharyngeal Cancer (비인두암종에 의한 측두하악장애)

  • Byun, Young-Sub;Kim, Ki-Seo;Ahn, Hyung-Joon;Choi, Jong-Hoon;Kwon, Jeong-Seung
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.33 no.4
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    • pp.395-399
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    • 2008
  • Orofacial pain and limited range of mouth opening as symptoms of temporomandibular disorder are mainly triggered by the structural and/or functional changes of temporomandibular joint and related structure itself. But careful diagnostic evaluation should be needed because they may be occurred by another pathologic conditions such as neoplasm in head and neck region. If there would be atypical pain characteristics or clinical features, systemic comorbid symptoms, or poor response to treatment, advanced imaging modalities such as CT or MRI will be mandatory for differential diagnosis. We experienced the case which was diagnosed as nasopharyngeal cancer mimicking temporomandibular disorder, and reviewed clinical considerations for proper differential diagnosis.

Declining Incidence of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Brunei Darussalam: a Three Decade Study (1986-2014)

  • Chong, Vui Heng;Telisinghe, Pemsari Upali;LIM, Edwin;Abdullah, Muhammad Syafiq;Idris, Fidah;Chong, Chee Fui
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.16
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    • pp.7097-7101
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    • 2015
  • Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is linked to Epstein Barr virus infection and is particularly common in the Far East, particularly among some Chinese groups. Certain ethnicities have been reported to have low incidence of NPC. This study looked at NPC in Brunei Darussalam over a three decade period. Materials and Methods: The cancer registry from 1986 to 2014 maintained by the State Laboratory was retrospectively reviewed. The age standardized rates (ASR) and the age specific incidence rates (ASIR) were calculated. Non NPC tumors were excluded from the study. Results: Altogether, there were a total of 450 NPC cases diagnosed accounting for 4.4% of all total cancer cases over the study period, declining from 10.3% in 1986-1990 to 2.3% in 2011-2014. The most common tumor type was the undifferentiated carcinoma (96.4%). The case characteristics were mean age $50.4{\pm}14.4$ years old, male 69%, and predominately Malays 74.4%, followed by Chinese 16.7%. The mean age of diagnosis increased over the study period from $45.6{\pm}17.1$ years (1986-1989) to $54.1{\pm}12.5$ years (ANOVA, p<0.01 for trend). There were no differences in the mean age of diagnosis between the ethnic groups or genders. The ASR showed a declining trend from 11.1 per 100,000 in 1986-1990 to 5.95 per 100,000 in 2011-2014, similar trends been observedfor both genders. Among the age groups, declining trends were seen in all the other age groups apart from the >70 years group. The overall ASRs for the Malays and Chinese were 7.92/100,000 and 8.83/100,000 respectively, both showing declining trends. Conclusions: The incidence of NPC in Brunei Darussalam is comparable to rates reported from Singapore and Malaysia, but higher than rates reported from the other Southeast Asian nations. Unlike higher rates reported for Chinese compared to the Malays in other countries, the rates between the Malays and Chinese in our study was comparable. Importantly, the ASR is declining overall and for both genders and ethnic groups.