• Title, Summary, Keyword: Mural

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Play Costume from the Mural Paintings of Goguryeo (고구려 고분벽화에 나타난 놀이복식)

  • Yim, Lynn;Lee, Tae-Ho
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.60 no.3
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    • pp.10-25
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    • 2010
  • The culture of the play of Korean ancient times is well described in the mural painting of Goguryeo. The example is people appearing in the play painting of performance, dance, hunting, and acrobatics out of 20 mural painting of genre. Their costume is broadly classified into performance, dance, hunting, and acrobatic costume and can be subdivided according to the types of costume. First, the head gear of play costume reflected the formality and social conditions of play. In the performance and hunting costume, all performers wore gwanmo(official hats), which seemed to make it a rule to wear gwanmo. Gwanmo was borrowed intactly from Goguryeo without any changes or decorations, which showed that the status symbolism of head gear was applied intactly to play costume. Second, the play costume of Goguryeo enhanced efficiency by blending daily costume with elements and decorations needed for play performance. Specifically the change of length was prominent: the short sleeves of jeogori(traditional blouse), the long sleeves of dance costume, and fastening below the knee or putting into the long shoes to shorten the length of baji(traditional pants). Finally, as it is well known that there was some differences in the expression modes of daily clothes in Goguryeo between Tonggu and Pyeongyang. Similarly, play costume tried to change costume according to the subject of play but maintained the locality and peculiarity of Goguryeo costume. Although performance costume showed many local differences, it also had similarity and peculiarity. In dance costume, long sleeves and patterns which frequently appeared in the Tonggu area reappeared in the Pyeongyang.

A Study on A Board Fence Design with a Convergence-style Mural (융복합 담장 디자인 연구)

  • Park, Gun-Kyu;Kim, Won-seok;Kim, Hae-jin
    • Journal of Digital Convergence
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.421-426
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    • 2016
  • This study suggests a board fence design with a convergence-style mural. The basic structure contains pictorial factors with mural paintings on the fence. It is also equipped with electricity facilities inside the fence itself, so it has not only the unique function of the fence but also the complexity and expandability in order to be used as a garden lighting and security alarm system. All the components meet the standard so they can be manufactured in a factory. Through this design proposal, this study tries to suggest a fence which encourages personal or social communication one another as well as the basic function of the fence. As a result, the fence realizes a broad convergence function of its usefulness for social functioning such as the crime prevention as well as an esthetic function.

The Research of Condition for Mural Tomb in Goa-ri, Goryeong in Gaya period (대가야 시기 고령 고아리 벽화 고분의 보존 상태 연구)

  • Lee, Kyeong Min;Lee, Hwa Soo;Han, Kyeong Soon
    • MUNHWAJAE Korean Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies
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    • v.48 no.4
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    • pp.44-61
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    • 2015
  • Mural tomb in Goa-ri(Goryeong) built in the 6th Century Gaya period investigated precisely by the scientific method. They were used to optical equipments for investigation and made a damage map according to the damaging types. The mortar layer was mostly exfoliated from the rest of the wall except for the burial chamber ceiling and corridor ceiling. Also painting layers rarely not observed. Most of the paintings were damaged except lotus painting in burial chamber ceiling. Various damage types that exfoliation, earthen dirt, film coating were found in murals. Damage factors of mural were the porous characteristics of mortar layer and the movement of moisture in the murals. They were caused physical damage such as crack, exfoliation. It was getting worse and causing to secondary damage like earthen dirt, film coating.

A Study of Historical Costume from the Mural Tombs of Dukheungri (덕흥리(德興里) 고분벽화(古墳壁畵)의 복식사적(服飾史的) 연구(硏究))

  • Park, Kyung-Ja
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.5
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    • pp.41-63
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    • 1981
  • The mural portraits of the ancient Dukheungri tombs are very important for the study of our traditional costume because the tomb contains a stone. with the in-scription of the date of its erection, 408 A.D. and the name, and official status of the buried. The costumes shown in the mural paintings will be the basis on which historical research can be made concerning costumes before and after 400 A. D. The costume in the mural paintings is classified into five different categories; You (jacket), Po (overcoat), Go (trousers), Sang (skirt), and Gwan (hat). Comparing these categories with those of other mural paintings lead us to the following conclusions. 1. The length of the You (jacket) reaches below the buttocks and the sleeves are narrow. The edges of the sleeves are decorated with stripes. The You (jacket) over-laps on the right, center, and left sides, and there are many Jikryong (V-collar) and Danryong (rounded collar) styles, but it has a similar tendency to others of the Pyongyang area which exhibit many foreign influences. In a departure from tradition. the belts on the men's You (jackets) have only 3 knots in the front, with the back having more knots than the front. The belts of the women's You (jacket) seem to have had a band or button for fastening. We must re-evaluate the assumption that the You (jacket) and Go (trousers) of the northern peoples had the common characters of a belted You (jacket) and Po (over-coat) and that the Gorum originated from the Goryo or Unified Silla dynasty. The outside of the sleeves are longer and more to the side than the inner garment (underwear) so that the sleeves of the inner garment frequently overlapped the outer dress. The above mentioned facts have lead to the discovery of the "Hansam," "Tosi" and "Geodoolgi." 2. The Po (overcoat) was used only by the upperclasses and differs from those found in other mural tombs. The Po (overcoat) of the noble on the tomb mural is centered with an overlapping Jikryong (V-collar) while the other Po (overcoats) of the upperclasses are characterized by an overlap on the left, a Danryong (rounded collar) with two types of sleeves (wide and narrow). Foreign influences and traditional influences coexist in Po (overcoat). Belts have frontal knots without exceptions. The facts that the belts on the You (jackets) are on the front and the belts on the Po (overcoats) are on the back must be reexamined. 3. Go (trousers) is usually narrow, being wider in the rear and narrower below the knees. They were used by hunters on the back of horses with similar Go (trousers) from the Noinwoowha tombs being typical of the northern peoples. 4. Sang (skirts) are pleated as commonly seen in the Goguryo murals. The size of the pleat is varied, each pleat being characteristically wider and having different colors. Same types of pleat are discovered in Central Asia and China. It is uncertain whether the pleat of Goguryo was originated in Central Asia and China or only interrelated with those of the areas. 5. There are three kinds of Gwan (hats); Nagwan, Chuck, and Heukgun. Nag-wan was worn by the dead lords and their close relations. Chuck has three cone shaped horns. Heukgun was worn by military bandmen and horsemen. There are two kinds of hair styles. The up-style was used by the upperclass people closely related to lords, and other people used the Pungimoung hair style. The hair styles of the men and women are characterized by the Pungimoung style. which is a Chinese influence, but still retain their originality. The costume has a similar tendency from those from Yaksuri mural tombs, Anak No. 2 and Anak No. 3. We need to reexamine the costumes from $4{\sim}5$ century murals according to the Dukheungri murals. The costumes of Goguryo share many common factors with those of Western Asia, Central Asia and Ancient China (Han). It seems due to the cultural exchanges among the Northern peoples, the Western and Central Asians, and the Ancient Chinese. It may have resulted from the structural identity or morphological identity of the peoples, or their common social and natural environments and life styles. It will be very valuable to study the costumes of Japan, China, and Korea to find out the common factors. It is only regretful that the study is not based on direct observations but reported information made by 77 persons, because Dukheungri is an off-limits area to us.

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A Study on the Sustainable Ewha Mural Village in a Viewpoint of Urban Regeneration (도시재생 관점에서 지속가능한 이화동 벽화마을에 관한 연구)

  • Kim, bo-mi;Son, Yong-Hoon;Lee, Dong-Kun;Lee, Hyun-Jin
    • Journal of the Korean Institute of Landscape Architecture
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    • v.47 no.3
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    • pp.1-11
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    • 2019
  • The purpose of this study is to propose a sustainable village-unit urban regeneration plan for the Ewha Mural Village, where mural artists recovered concrete fences to be followed by some residents damaging the mural paintings. Through a review of the existing literature and a preliminary survey, we derived the urban regeneration factors (environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, and social sustainability) applicable at the village level. After an empirical survey on the residents, we tried to identify various problems of the Ewha Mural Village. Residents selected the factors of accessibility, parking management, diversity of industries, creation of new jobs, community participation of residents for the mural village's activation, and stable living spaces. In the case of Ewha Mural Village, physical environment factors for the residents at the time of construction were not considered and the village was mainly planned using budget-based murals. Since then, the inequality of economic benefits intensified the conflicts among the residents. In addition, public benefits, such as establishing new industries and employing outsiders, were not provided, and these facts appear to have led to an unsustainable murals village, in which the murals that are the protagonists of the village revitalization are being destroyed. Therefore, the urban regeneration of Ewha Mural Village should be designed considering a region where some residential areas can be transformed into tourist areas. In addition, it is essential to employ a win-win method to improve the living environment, such as road maintenance, not only partial economic benefits, such as increased land-value, and to increase resident's value as a common asset within the village itself.

Infra-Red Reflectography Based Mural Underdrawing Mosaicing Technique (적외선 리플렉토그래피 기반 벽화 밑그림 영상 모자익 기법)

  • Lee, Tae-Seong;Gwon, Yong-Mu;Go, Han-Seok
    • Proceedings of the KIEE Conference
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    • pp.191-194
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    • 2003
  • In this paper, we propose a new accurate and robust image mosaic technique of the mural underdrawing taken from the infra-red camera, which is based on multiple image registration and adaptive blending technique. The image mosaicing methods which have been developed so far have the following deficits. It is hard to generate a high resolution image when there are regions that do not have features or intensity gradients, and there is a trade-off in overlapping region site in view of registration and blending. We consider these issues as follows. First, in order to mosaic Images with neither noticeable features nor intensity gradients, we use a Projected supplementary pattern and pseudo color image for features in the image Pieces which are registered. Second, we search the overlapping region size with minimum blending error between two adjacent images and then apply blending technique to minimum error overlapping region. Finally, we could find our proposed method is more effective and efficient for image mosaicing than conventional mosaic techniques and also is more adequate for the application of infra-red mural underdrawing mosaicing. Experimental results show the accuracy and robustness of the algorithm.

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Designing a Digital Reconstruction of Koguryo Mural using Virtual Reality Technology for Interactive Cultural Heritage Learning (상호작용적인 문화 교육을 위해 가상현실을 이용한 고구려 벽화 복원 연구)

  • Cho Yong-Joo;Moon Hyung-Tae
    • Journal of the Korea Institute of Information and Communication Engineering
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    • v.10 no.8
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    • pp.1359-1365
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    • 2006
  • Digital Koguryo is a virtual reality reconstruction of the Koguryo mural tumulus, Anak No. 3, designed for an interactive educational gaming and learning environment. Digital Koguryo aims at not only developing a digital reconstruction of cultural heritage but also helping young students learn the living style and the custom of Koguryo Kingdom while playing the game environment. This paper describes the digital restoration process of Koguryo mural paintings and 3D structure, as well as the construction of educational virtual environment designed to get more user's interests. It then discusses a few design issues learned from the development and the public demonstration. Finally, it will present the future research directions to improve the users' immersion.

A Refutation on the view of Parhae Marek's Origin as from Kokuryo (발해 말액(抹額)의 고구려 기원설 재검토)

  • Kim, Min-Jee
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.59 no.5
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    • pp.180-201
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    • 2009
  • I scrutinized the idea that Parhae Marek was inherited from Kokuryo which was presented in "The study on the Marek" published in the journal of the Korean Society of Costume 55-5, and concluded the following results: 1. The Marek which Samguk sagi recorded is the red head scarf used for dancers who do Koguryo dance in the Babarian Music System in Tang dynasty. Since its original record Tong dian tells that Kokuryo performers' costumes then had strikingly changed and Quichi and GaoChang dancers also wore Marek, so the idea that Marek was originated from Koguryo should be reconsidered. 2. Considering the Yaksoori mural's indistinguishable condition as well as the same scenes from other Kokuryo mural paintings, I can't evidently tell that the first person who carries shouldering drum puts Marek on. 3. should be pronounced [Mal] for the meaning of a head scarf and its definition can't be limited only for the sash type. 4. Diverse historical data on head scarves deny the assumption that the sash type of hairband would have been succeeded from Kokuryo to the Parhae Marek. 5. The Marek of Princess Junghyo's mural painting can be an example that shows the costume of Tang influenced Parhae's. But the similarity in styles of costume between contemporary countries doesn't mean their reciprocal racial or political identity.

A Study on the Daily life Furniture in Three Kingdoms and Unified Silla Period - Based on the Sang(상) and Tap(탑) - (사료로 본 삼국 및 통일신라시대의 기거용 가구 - 床榻(상탑)을 중심으로-)

  • Lee Jeong-Mee
    • Korean Institute of Interior Design Journal
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.80-88
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    • 2005
  • The ondol is a uniquely Korean system of providing warmth to room. The ondol rooms never use daily life furniture because the ondol warms the floor surface where people sit. Finally, the ondol floor changed the traditional housings inner space. Before use ondol where daily life furnitures[sang(상) and Tap(탑)] are installed in the room. The origin of daily life furnitures are the ancient tomb mural of Koguryo Period. The daily life furniture can be classified as three large groups in the ancient tomb mural of Koguryo. First, a single seat[Jowa-sang(좌상)] of set up a screen[병풍]. The second, It make possible Many peoples take a seat with no decoration seat[Tap(탑)]. The third, uptodately table and chairs. A radical difference between sang(상) and Tap(탑) whether set up a screen[병풍]. The meaning of sang(상) and Tap(탑) in Koguryo ancient tomb provided Oksa-jo[옥사조] in Samkuk-sagi[삼국사기] with several valuable leads to help solve the sang(상)'s meaning. Furthermore, It will be start ponit of study on constructive shape of inner space in those days.

A Comparative Study on Ancient Gagye on Mural Paintings in Korea and China (한국과 중국 고분벽화에 나타난 고대 가계의 비교연구)

  • Yim, Lynn
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Clothing and Textiles
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    • v.36 no.7
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    • pp.778-789
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    • 2012
  • The characteristics of ancient gagye (the cubic hair style which added wigs or other materials to hair) that appeared in mural paintings were compared between Pyongyang and Jian in Goguryeo and the midlands, the northwest region, and the northeast region in China for the same period (Han to Weijin, and Northern and Southern Dynasties). Gagye in Korea and China was classified into circle type, hat type, high-bun type, and multi-bun type; in addition, Han elements, northern race elements, Goguryeo elements, and uniqueness were compared and analyzed according to regional distribution, trend periods, and style characteristics. The Han elements of ancient gagye in Korea and China appeared in the hat type, the high-bun type, and accessories that left the hair down. The northern race elements were found in the circle type and multi-bun type. The uniqueness of Goguryeo elements included a circle from the circle type, a triangle style from the hat type, an up-do style from the high burn type, and simplified hair accessories.