• Title, Summary, Keyword: Microbial Population

Search Result 530, Processing Time 0.046 seconds

Effect of inclusion of different levels of Leucaena silage on rumen microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers fed on rice straw

  • Nguyen, Thien Truong Giang;Wanapat, Metha;Phesatcha, Kampanat;Kang, Sungchhang
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.30 no.2
    • /
    • pp.181-186
    • /
    • 2017
  • Objective: Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena) is a perennial tropical legume that can be directly grazed or harvested and offered to ruminants as hay, silage, or fresh. However, Leucaena contain phenolic compounds, which are considered anti-nutritional factors as these may reduce intake, digestibility and thus animal performance. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to determine effects of Leucaena silage (LS) feeding levels on rumen microbial populations, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers. Methods: Four, rumen fistulated dairy steers with initial weight of $167{\pm}12kg$ were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a $4{\times}4$ Latin square design. Treatments were as followings: T1 = untreated rice straw (RS; Control), T2 = 70% RS+30% LS, T3 = 40% RS+60% LS, and T4 = 100% LS. Dairy steers were fed rice straw and LS ad libitum and supplemented with concentrate at 0.2% of body weight/d. Results: Results revealed that the rumen microbial population, especially cellulolytic, proteolytic bacteria and fungal zoospores were enhanced in steers that received 60% of LS (p<0.05), whereas the amylolytic bacteria population was not affected by treatments (p>0.05). Protozoal population was linearly decreased with increasing level of LS (p<0.05). Moreover, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis were enhanced by LS feeding (p<0.05) and were the highest in 60% LS group. Conclusion: Based on this study, it could be concluded that replacement of RS with 60% LS significantly improved microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in diary steers.

Temporal and Spatial Change in Microbial Diversity in New-developed Wetland Soil Covered by Tamarix chinesis Community in Chinese Yellow River Delta

  • Chen Weifeng;Ann Seoung-Won;Kim Hong-Nam;Shi Yanxi;Mi Qinghua
    • Journal of Environmental Science International
    • /
    • v.14 no.4
    • /
    • pp.367-371
    • /
    • 2005
  • Soil samples were collected from new-developed wetland soil ecosystem of Tamarix chinesis plantation in Chinese Yellow River Delta in different months of 2003. Soil characteristics, temporal change and spatial distribution of microbial community composition and their relationship with nitrogen turnover and circling were investigated in order to analyze and characterize the role of microbial diversity and functioning in the specific soil ecosystem. The result showed that the total population of microbial community in the studied soil was considerably low, compared with common natural ecosystem. The amount of microorganism followed as the order: bacteria> actinomycetes>fungi. Amount of actinomycetes were higher by far than that of fungi. Microbial population remarkably varied in different months. Microbial population of three species in top horizon was corrected to that in deep horizon. Obvious rhizosphere effect was observed and microbial population was significantly higher in rhizosphere than other soils due to vegetation growth, root exudation, and cumulative dead fine roots. Our results demonstrate that microbial diversity is low, while is dominated by specific community in the wetland ecosystem of Tamarix chinesi.

The Study of Microbial Population & Dynamics in Hydrocarbon Contaminated Areas (유류오염지역의 미생물 분포 및 활성도에 관한 연구)

  • 김무훈;김순기;이원권;경우성;박덕신
    • Proceedings of the Korean Society of Soil and Groundwater Environment Conference
    • /
    • /
    • pp.28-31
    • /
    • 1999
  • The purpose of this study is to see the effect of microbial population and dynamics of the indigeonous microorganisms on hydrocarbon contaminated areas. The microbial structures and activities to determine the microbial capabilities of the contaminated sites are very important for the remedial action technology selection. Throughout microbial studies on different conditions by ETS(Electron Transport System) and microbial activity analysis, it was found that aeration and water contents are the most important factors in this site remediation. According to test results, Burkholderia spp. was dominant species, and acclimation is also an important factor for the accerelated biodegradation.

  • PDF

Enzyme and Microbial Activities in Paddy Soil Amended Continuously with Different Fertilizer Systems

  • Gadagi, Ravi;Park, Chang-Young;Im, Geon-Jae;Lee, Dong-Chang;Chung, Jong-Bae;Singvilay, Olayvanh;Sa, Tong-Min
    • Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture
    • /
    • v.20 no.5
    • /
    • pp.325-329
    • /
    • 2001
  • Soil enzyme and microbial activities are affected by fertilizer and compost applications and can be used as sensitive indicators of ecological stability. Microbial population and soil enzymes viz., dehydrogenase, urease, acid phosphatase and aryl-sulphatase were determined in the long-term fertilizer and compost applied paddy soil. Soil samples were collected from the four treatments (control, compost, NPK and compost+NPK). Long-term NPK+compost application significantly increased activities of urease, dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase than all other treatments. The compost application enhanced activities of urease, dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase than the NPK application. However, arylsulfatase activity was not significantly different between compost and fertilizer application. The highest microbial population was recorded in the NPK+compost treatment. The compost application also resulted in higher microbial population than the NPK application. The above results indicate that ecological stability could be maintained by application of compost alone or with NPK.

  • PDF

Relationship between Chemical Property and Microbial Activity of Reclaimed Tidal Lands at Western Coast Area in Korea

  • Ko, Eun-Seong;Joung, Ji-An;Kim, Chang-Hwan;Lee, Su Hwan;Sa, Tongmin;Choi, Joon-Ho
    • Korean Journal of Soil Science and Fertilizer
    • /
    • v.47 no.4
    • /
    • pp.254-261
    • /
    • 2014
  • The scientific information between microbial activities and chemical properties of reclaimed tidal soil is not enough to apply for reclamation projects. This study was conducted to investigate the relation between chemical properties and microbial activities of reclaimed tidal lands located at western coastal area (25 samples from Nampo, Ewon, Sukmoon and Shihwa sites). Most of the reclaimed soils showed chemical characteristics as salinity soil except Nampo site. The major component influenced the salinity of reclaimed soil was identified as a sodium from the relationship between EC and exchangeable cation. With an increase in EC of soil, the population of mesophilic bacteria decreases whereas halotolerant and halophilic bacteria increases. The population of mesophilic bacteria increased with an increase in both organic matter and dehydrogenase activity. However, the population of halotolerant and halophilic bacteria decreased with an increase in organic matter. Based on the relation between chemical property and microbial activity of reclaimed tidal soil, electrical conductivity and organic matter as chemical properties of soil, population of mesophilic bacteria, halotolerant and halophilic bacteria and dehydrogenase activity as microbial activities could be the major parameters for reclamation process.

On the Decay Rate of Soil Organic Matter and Changes of Soil Microbial populaiton (토양유기물의 분해속도와 Microbial populaiton의 소장에 관한 연구)

  • 김춘민
    • Journal of Plant Biology
    • /
    • v.10 no.1_2
    • /
    • pp.21-30
    • /
    • 1967
  • The aim of present study is to elucidate the relationship between decay rate of soil organic matter, and the change of soil microbial population under the oak and pine forest soils in Kwang-nung plantation stand. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The correlation coefficient between decay rate and the soil bacteria is 0.84 and fungi 0.93. 2) The distribution of soil microbial population is higher in both F horizon of the oak forest soil, and F and H horizon of the pine forest soil. However, the number of soil microorganisms decreases with the depth in each forest soil. 3) The population of soil microbes is related to moisture content, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and exchangeable calcium, except organic carbon in fungi. 4) The soil organic matter has been mainly decomposed by fungi, and the size of its population are governed by the factors such as moisture content, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and exchangeable calcium.

  • PDF

Relation between Chemical Properties and Microbial Activities in Soils from Reclaimed Tidal Lands at South-western Coast Area in Korea

  • Park, Mi-Na;Go, Gang-Seuk;Kim, Chang-Hwan;Bae, Hui-Su;Sa, Tongmin;Choi, Joon-Ho
    • Korean Journal of Soil Science and Fertilizer
    • /
    • v.48 no.4
    • /
    • pp.262-270
    • /
    • 2015
  • The scientific information between microbial community and chemical properties of reclaimed tidal soil is not enough to understand the land reclamation process. This study was conducted to investigate the relation between chemical properties and microbial activities of soils from reclaimed tidal lands located at south-western coastal area (42 samples from Goheuong, Samsan, Bojun, Kunnae, Hwaong and Yeongsangang sites). Most of the reclaimed soils showed chemical characteristics as salinity soil based on EC. Only $Na^+$ in exchangeable cation was dependent on EC of reclaimed soil, whereas other cations such as $K^+$, $Ca^{2+}$, and $Mg^{2+}$ were independent on EC. The mesophilic bacteria decreased with an increase in EC of soil. Microbial population increased with soil organic content in the range of $0{\sim}10g\;kg^{-1}$ and dehydrogenase activity less than $100{\mu}g-TPF\;g^{-1}h^{-1}$. Microbial population of soils from reclaimed tidal lands was closely related to the microbial community containing hydrolytic enzyme activities of cellulase, amylase, protease, and lipase.

Enzyme Activities in the Soil of Quercus mongolica Forests (신갈나무 산림토양에서의 효소활성도)

  • Song In-Geun;Yong-Keel Choi;Byung-Re Min
    • The Korean Journal of Ecology
    • /
    • v.18 no.4
    • /
    • pp.503-512
    • /
    • 1995
  • The present paper describes partial results of the study on the activities of microbes in the soil of Quercus mongolica forest from July, 1994 to April, 1995. To determine the relationship between structure and function of soil microbial ecosystem, the author investigated the seasonal change of physical environmental factors, microbial population and soil enzyme activities. The changes of pH was not significant and the temperature of surface soil was 2℃ higher than lower soil through out the year. Moisture contents (%) of soil samples ranged from 7.64% to 42.11%. However, soils of site 3 at Mt. Komdan in which vegetation is successional have higher moisture content than the others. The bacterial population increased in summer, but continuously decreased in autumn and winter, and then reincreased again in spring. Bacterial population of surface soil was higher than those of 30 cm depth all the year round. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was about two-fold higher throughout in surface soil compared to those of lower soil. And the correlation coefficient between DHA and bacterial population size was 0,713, It was suggested that DHA could be used as a primary index of soil microbial population and activity in soil ecosystem.

  • PDF

Modeling Growth Kinetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Food Fermentation

  • Chung, Dong-Hwa;Kim, Myoung-Dong;Kim, Dae-Ok;Koh, Young-Ho;Seo, Jin-Ho
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
    • /
    • v.15 no.5
    • /
    • pp.664-671
    • /
    • 2006
  • Modeling the growth kinetics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), one of the most valuable microbial groups in the food industry, has been actively pursued in order to understand, control, and optimize the relevant fermentation processes. Most modeling approaches have focused on the development of single population models. Primary single population models provide fundamental kinetic information on the proliferation of a primary LAB species, the effects of biological factors on cell inhibition, and the metabolic reactions associated with cell growth. Secondary single population models can evaluate the dependence of primary model parameters, such as the maximum specific growth rate of LAB, on the initial external environmental conditions. This review elucidates some of the most important single population models that are conveniently applicable to the LAB fermentation analyses. Also, a well-defined mixed population model is presented as a valuable tool for assessing potential microbial interactions during fermentation with multiple LAB species.

Changes of Principal Components and Microbial Population in Pyungwi-san Decoction according to the Preservation Temperature and Period (평위산 전탕액의 보관온도 및 기간에 따른 주요성분 및 미생물 군집 변화)

  • Seo, Chang-Seob;Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo;Kim, Jung-Hoon;Shin, Kwang-Soo
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
    • /
    • v.32 no.5
    • /
    • pp.41-49
    • /
    • 2011
  • Objectives: To optimize the preservation method of herbal decoction, we investigated the content of principle components of Pyungwi-san, liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, and hesperidin according to preservation temperature and period. We also investigated the changing patterns of pH and microbial population in Pyungwi-san decoction as a model case. Methods: With samples preserved at different temperatures, the content of liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, and hesperidin was determined using HPLC and microbial population was determined as viable counting method up to 8 times every month. Identification of isolated bacteria was performed by 16S rDNA analysis. Results: The content of liquiritin and glycyrrhizin did not change according to the preservation temperature and period, but that of hesperidin was severely decreased at room temperature. The isolate from the decoction was identified as Bacillus licheniformis by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Microbial population appeared after 3 months' preservation and reached maximum value at 4 months; at all tested temperatures, the pH showed the lowest value (4.4-4.5) simultaneously. Conclusion: From the results, it seems to be that the microbial growth affects the pH of preserved decoction but not the change of liquiritin and glycyrrhizin content.