• Title/Summary/Keyword: Medical education

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A Proposal for the Future of Medical Education Accreditation (의학교육 평가인증의 미래를 위한 제언)

  • Lim, Ki-Young
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.22 no.1
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    • pp.28-31
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    • 2020
  • For the past 20 years, the medical education accreditation program of Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) has contributed greatly to the standardization and improvement of the quality of basic medical education in Korea. Now, it contributes to establishing and promoting the future of medical education. Since its inception in 2019, Accreditation Standard of KIMEE 2019 (ASK2019) aims to achieve world-class medical education through the application of learner-centered curriculum using a continuum framework for the three phases of formal medical education: basic medical education, post-graduate medical education, and continuing professional development. ASK2019 also promotes medical education which meets community needs and employs systematic assessments throughout the education process. These are important changes that can be used to gauge the future of the medical education accreditation system. Furthermore, internationalization, interprofessional education, health systems science, and on-going, permanent self-assessment systems in every medical school are emerging as important topics for the future of medical education. It's time for the medical education accreditation system in Korea to observe and adopt new trends in global medical education.

Burnout among Medical Education Specialists in Korean Medical Colleges (의학교육 전문부서 교원의 탈진현상)

  • Park, Kwihwa;Lee, Young-Mee
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.92-98
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    • 2014
  • Medical education departments or offices are established in response to public expectations relating to health care, societal trends towards increased accountability, educational developments, increased interest in what to teach and how to educate doctors. However, heavy workloads and mixed feelings towards medical education departments or offices by the other members of a medical school can threaten job satisfaction and increase burnout. The authors investigated the prevalence of burnout among medical education specialists and related issues. Individual in-depth interviews with four medical education specialists were conducted to develop a questionnaire. After content analysis of the interview, the authors generated a survey form with 28 items including 6 categories: motivation to choose medical education as a career, job satisfaction, intention to leave their current position in medical education, the frequency and causes of burnout, and demographics. In September 2013, an email survey was administered to 43 faculty including non-tenure staff who were working in the department/office of medical education in 41 medical colleges in Korea. Of 43 medical education specialists, 25 (60%) returned surveys. Forty three-point-three percent of them felt encouraged when their endeavors generated a visible educational improvement in the medical school. A majority (87%) reported feeling burned out. Fifty percent of them experienced the feeling once or twice a year. The extent of burnout tended to be greater in women, those in their forties, those with non-medical doctor degrees, and in non-tenured staff. To reduce and prevent burnout among medical education specialists, the participants suggested that leadership of medical schools and a systematic approach to medical education should be established. A majority of the medical education specialists reported experiencing burnout, although they were satisfied with their jobs. To reduce their burnout and allow them to focus on their own work in medical education, the following factors are needed: perceptual changes of other members of the college about medical education; more systematic institutional strategies; networking among medical education specialists; and personal efforts for professional development.

Integrated Management Plan for Graduate Medical Education and Accreditation Bodies in Korea (우리나라 전공의 교육 및 관련 인증기관에 대한 통합적 관리계획)

  • Lim, Ki-Young
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.20 no.3
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    • pp.123-127
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    • 2018
  • Graduate medical education is the most important phase among the three stages of medical education. It links basic medical education and continuing professional development. It is also a critical period in acquiring meaningful knowledge, skills and professionalism. The residents should be able to develop the core common competencies on top of their specialozeds field's expertise, in order to function as independent and qualified physicians. Despite the obvious importance of graduate medical education, the system in Korea has been designed and executed to meet the needs of the hospitals in the perspective of manpower management, rather than to educate and empower the residents. As a result, graduate medical education in Korea lacks clear educational objectives and systemic, resident-centered curriculums. Yet, we have no accreditation body to evaluate graduate medical education programs. In order to normalize graduate medical education, an integrated and unified institution that manages the whole process of the graduate medical education is desperately needed. Special attention should be given to the role of medical schools in educating the core common competencies. The Korean Association of Medical Colleges, the Korean Institute for Medical Education and Evaluation, and the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences should cooperate intimately to establish a new organization for the systemic management and development of graduate medical education.

Is the Accreditation in Medical Education an Opportunity or a Burden? (의학교육 평가인증, 기회인가 부담인가?)

  • Jung, Hanna;Jeon, Woo Taek;An, Shinki
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.22 no.1
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    • pp.16-27
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    • 2020
  • The accreditation process (AccP) is both an opportunity and a burden for medical schools-which one it becomes depends on how medical schools recognize and utilize the AccP. In other words, if a medical school recognizes the AccP only as a formal procedure or as a means for continuing medical education, it will be a burden for the medical school. However, if a medical school recognizes the real and positive value of the AccP, it can be both an opportunity and a tool for developing medical education. The educational value of the AccP is to improve the quality, equity, and efficiency of medical education, along with increasing the options of choice. In order for the AccP to contribute to the development of medical education, accrediting agencies and medical schools must first be recognized as part of an "educational alliance" working together towards common goals. Secondly, clear guidelines on the accreditation standards should be periodically reviewed and shared. Finally, a formative evaluation using self-evaluation as a system that can utilize the AccP as an opportunity to develop medical education must be introduced. This type of evaluation system could be developed through collaboration among medical schools, academic societies for medical education, and the accrediting authority.

History of Japanese medical education

  • Onishi, Hirotaka
    • Korean journal of medical education
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    • v.30 no.4
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    • pp.283-294
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    • 2018
  • Since medical education programs in Korea and Japan seem to mutually influence each other, this review article provides a history of Japanese medical education, focusing on the way in which it influenced and was influenced by Korean medical education. In the late 19th century, the University of Tokyo established the core medical school, disseminating its scholarship and system to other medical schools. In the early 20th century, the balance between the quality and quantity of medical education became a new issue; in response, Japan developed different levels of medical school, ranging from imperial universities to medical colleges and medical vocational schools. After World War II, all of Japan's medical schools became part of the university system, which was heavily regulated by the Ministry of Education (MOE) Standard for the Establishment of Universities. In 1991, MOE deregulated the Standard; since 2000, several new systems have been established to regulate medical schools. These new approaches have included the Model Core Curriculum, 2-year mandatory postgraduate training, and a medical education accreditation system. Currently, most medical schools are nervous, as a result of tighter regulatory systems that include an accreditation system for undergraduate education and a specialty training system for postgraduate education.

A Study on the Improvement of the Medical Education System in Korea Since 1999 (1990년대 이후 의학교육제도 개선에 관한 고찰)

  • Lee, Moo Sang
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.37-49
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    • 2012
  • The main purpose of this study is to examine the improvement and discourse of the medical education system in Korea since 1990. In particular, this study, focusing on the graduate medical education system initiated in 2002, has explored the discussions that led to the system's establishment and what the context of those discussions. To meet this objective, this study analyzed research report related to the medical education system authored by members of the government and medical community, suggestions to the government, discussion materials, and data with regard to the Medical (Dental) Education Eligibility Test. The improvement of the medical education system in Korea has been an important issue in education reform by the expansion of the number of years of higher education, the requirements for increased levels of professional knowledge by improving public educational standards, and the basic formation policy of higher education consisting of graduate school, special graduate school, and professional graduate school. Nevertheless, the views of the government and the medical community on improving medical education system have made an obvious difference. This was due to different aims about how to improve the medical education system and different perception of the degree and medical education system. The medical community at least tended to prefer the status of academic positions over professional positions. The policy of medical education for people with a bachelor's degree which was introduced in 2002 spread to many colleges of medicine based on the government's administrative and financial support policy. Even so, the absence of accompanying policy by the relevant government agencies and department of education, which could have ensured the success of the system, has led to continued debate. In conclusion, without a consistent and persistent government policy, the graduate medical education system has led to confusion in many medical institutions. Above all, an evidence-based policy decision and policy approach based on a long-term perspective are necessary in order to improve the medical education system.

The Tasks of Medical Education to Support the Formation of Medical Professional Identity (전문직 정체성 형성을 위한 의학교육 현장의 과제)

  • Kim, Sun
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.23 no.2
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    • pp.104-107
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    • 2021
  • Building professional identity is the most basic purpose of medical education. Students who enter medical schools do not have an identity rooted in the medical profession, and universities should therefore take steps to help students form their identity as doctors, attitudes, beliefs, and values through the curriculum. However, while medical knowledge and clinical skills are fully reflected in basic medical education, issues persist regarding education on values, attitudes, and beliefs that are important for professional identity. Regarding the process of professional identity formation, it is important to keep in mind that rapid changes in modern society lead to corresponding changes in socio-cultural expectations and demands related to professional identity, resulting in discrepancies between the reality of medical education and the actual field of medicine. Medical schools need to prepare students for these discrepancies, and in-depth discussions should address what is important and what should be solved first at medical education sites. However, it is difficult to generalize the tasks of professional identity formation in the field of medical education because each medical school may have unique circumstances. This article discusses the tasks that medical education should solve for professional identity formation education in terms of five aspects: establishing learning outcomes, training educational experts, introducing transformative learning, utilizing self-directed learning, and developing evaluation methods.

Trends in the study on medical education over the last 10 years, based on paper titles

  • Kim, Seong Yong
    • Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science
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    • v.36 no.2
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    • pp.78-84
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    • 2019
  • Medical education research subjects are incredibly diverse and have changed over time. This work in particular aims to compare and analyze research trends in medical education through the words used in the titles of these research papers. Academic Medicine (the journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges), Medical Teacher (the journal of the Association of Medical Education in Europe), the Korean Journal of Medical Education (KJME), and Korean Medical Education Review (KMER) were selected and analyzed for the purposes of this research. From 2009 to 2018, Academic Medicine and Medical Teacher published approximately 10 to 20 times more papers than the KJME and KMER. Frequently used words in these titles include "medical," "student," "education," and "learning." The words "clinical" and "learning" were used relatively often (7.80% to 13.66%) in Korean journals and Medical Teacher, but Academic Medicine used these phrases relatively less often (6.47% and 4.41%, respectively). Concern with such various topics as problem-based learning, team-based learning, program evaluations, burnout, e-learning, and digital indicates that Medical Teacher seems to primarily deal with teaching and learning methodologies, and Academic Medicine handles all aspects of medical education. The KJME and KMER did not cover all subjects, as they publish smaller papers. However, it is anticipated that research on new subjects, such as artificial intelligence in medical education, will occur in the near future.

Clinical Competency-Centered Learning Outcomes in Basic Medical Education (진료역량 중심의 기본의학교육 학습성과)

  • Lee, Kang Wook
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.145-149
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    • 2016
  • Outcome-based learning is a global trend in medical education. The Korean Association of Medical Colleges (KAMC) has been developing learning objectives for basic medical education (BME) in Korea. In 2012, KAMC published the 1st edition of "Learning outcomes of basic medical education: Clinical competency-centered" in order to promote outcome-based medical education. KAMC has recently revised and updated the learning outcomes of basic medical education in the clinical competency-centered 2nd edition to reflect the suggestions of all medical schools in Korea and improve application of the published learning outcomes for BME in the field of medical education. KAMC has been making efforts to integrate clinical competency-centered learning outcomes with scientific concepts and principle-centered learning outcomes in addition to basic clinical skills and performance in BME.