• Title, Summary, Keyword: Meat quality

Search Result 1,969, Processing Time 0.05 seconds

Effects of Intensive Alfalfa Feeding on Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Profile of Korean Native Black Goats

  • Hwang, Young-Hwa;Bakhsh, Allah;Ismail, Ishamri;Lee, Jung-Gyu;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
    • /
    • v.38 no.5
    • /
    • pp.1092-1100
    • /
    • 2018
  • The aim of this study was to determine meat quality characteristics and fatty acid composition of Korean native black goats (KNBG) finished on intensive feeding of alfalfa (ALF) and conventional feeding of commercial concentrate pellets (CCP) with low-energy common grasses. Ten KNBG (12 months old) were divided into two groups and subjected to either ALF or CCP treatments. The goats were slaughtered after 6 months of feeding with experimental diets to investigate meat quality characteristics and fatty acid compositions of longissimus lumborum muscle. There were no significant differences in proximate chemical composition, collagen, or myoglobin content between ALF and CCP groups of goats. Meat color, water-holding capacity, or tenderness was not significantly different between the two groups either. However, proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids were significantly (p<0.05) different between the two groups. The proportion of oleic acid was significantly (p<0.05) higher in ALF goat whereas proportion of linoleic and arachidonic acids were significantly (p<0.05) higher in CCP goat. Results suggest that KNBG finished with intensive feeding of alfalfa could produce goat meat with desirable fatty acids for human diets.

A Review: Influences of Pre-slaughter Stress on Poultry Meat Quality

  • Ali, Md. Shawkat;Kang, Geun-Ho;Joo, Seon Tea
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.21 no.6
    • /
    • pp.912-916
    • /
    • 2008
  • Pre-slaughter conditions affect poultry meat quality. Therefore, stresses before slaughter like heat stress, struggle and shackling on the shackle line, crating and transport and feed withdrawal are very important for the poultry industry in respect of quality as well as welfare of the birds. However, exposure to heat in oxidative stress can in turn lead to cytotoxicity in meat type birds. Chickens exposed to heat stress before slaughter showed the lowest ultimate pH and birds shackled for a longer time the highest. The abdominal fat content was higher in heat stressed birds. Struggling on the shackle line hastened the initial rate of the pH drop and increased the redness of breast meat. Again, with increasing struggling activity, lactate concentration in breast muscle of chicken increased. Paler meat was found in birds that were transported for a longer time than in those after a small journey or not transported. The pre-slaughter and eviscerated weights were decreased as the length of feed withdrawal period increased.

Effects of Dietary Coptis Chinensis Herb Extract on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Characteristics and Meat Quality in Growing-finishing Pigs

  • Zhou, T.X.;Zhang, Z.F.;Kim, I.H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.26 no.1
    • /
    • pp.108-115
    • /
    • 2013
  • The effects of dietary Coptis chinensis herb extract (CHE) on growth performance, blood characteristics, nutrient digestibility and meat quality of growing-finishing pigs were investigated in an 18-wk feeding trial. A total of 36 Landrace${\times}$Yorkshire-Duroc pigs with an initial body weight of $20{\pm}1.0$ kg were randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments with 6 replications per treatment and 2 pigs per pen. A maize-soybean meal-based diet was formulated as a control diet and other treatment diets were supplemented with 0.5, or 1 g CHE/kg, respectively. After the feeding period, meat samples were collected from those pigs that had reached the market BW. During the experimental periods, growth performance and apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter and nitrogen were unaffected (p>0.05) by the dietary supplementation of CHE. Plasma erythrocytes counts were increased (Linearly, p<0.05) in response to application of CHE at the end of the experiment. Moreover, pigs fed the CHE diets had better (p<0.05) meat color, pH and water holding capacity (WHC) than pigs fed the control diet. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with CHE could increase blood erythrocytes counts and improve meat quality in growing-finishing pigs but not improve growth performance.

Enhanced oxidative stability of meat by including tannin-rich leaves of woody plants in goat diet

  • Garcia, Elisa Mariana;Lopez, Agustin;Zimerman, Maria;Hernandez, Olegario;Arroquy, Jose Ignacio;Nazareno, Monica Azucena
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.32 no.9
    • /
    • pp.1439-1447
    • /
    • 2019
  • Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary incorporation of tanninrich woody species on meat oxidative stability, carcass traits and meat quality in goats. Methods: Two tannin-rich species were tested using a three-treatments feeding trial, where treatments consisted of: Larrea divaricata and Acacia aroma both at 12.5% in dry matter basis of the diet and a control diet (alfalfa hay). All feeding diets were iso-protein and iso-energy. Carcass conformation, carcass compactness, carcass fatness and subcutaneous fat deposition were evaluated. Intake, liveweigh, Longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscles of goats were analyzed in order to evaluate quality parameters such as pH value, instrumental color evaluation, water holding capacity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, meat oxidative stability and fatty acid profiles in meat. Results: Feed intake, liveweight gain, carcass, and meat traits did not differ among treatments. Changes in meat lipid profile among treatments were observed for oleic and elaidic acid contents. Meat total phenolic content and antioxidant activity did not differ among treatments; although, meat oxidative status after storage at room temperature, as well as under refrigerated and frozen conditions were different between control and both supplemented groups. Conclusion: The inclusion of Acacia aroma and Larrea divaricata leaves in goat diet enhanced meat oxidative stability. Modulation of the ruminal biohydrogenation of fatty acids produced by condensed tannins of these plant species need to be further investigated.

Quality Assessment of the Breast Meat from WoorimatdagTM and Broilers

  • Jung, Samooel;Lee, Kyung Haeng;Nam, Ki Chang;Jeon, Hee Jun;Choe, Jun Ho;Jo, Cheorun
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
    • /
    • v.34 no.5
    • /
    • pp.709-716
    • /
    • 2014
  • The objective of this study was to compare the characteristics that define the quality of Woorimatdag$^{TM}$ (WM, a certified meat-type commercial Korea indigenous chicken breed) and a commercial broiler breed (Ross, CB). Two hundred WM and 200 CB chickens that were 1-d-old and mixed sex were obtained from a commercial hatchery and randomly assigned to floor pens (20 chickens per pen, $3.0{\times}2.0m$) and raised under the same environmental conditions. WM breast meat contained significantly higher crude protein and ash as well as lower crude fat than CB breast meat (p<0.05). WM breast meat had slightly higher alanine, histidine, isoleucine, and glycine as well as lower phenylalanine content than CB breast meat (p<0.05), and the WM breast meat had a low ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acid composition (p<0.05). However, arachidonic acid composition was higher in the WM than the CB breast meat. In addition, the inosin-5'-monophosphate content was also higher in the WM compared with the CB breast (p<0.05). The WM breast meat had higher total collagen content compared with CB breast meat. WM soup taste received higher scores with regard to sensory evaluation compared with CB soup (p<0.05). From these results, we conclude that higher amount of protein and flavor precursors and lower amount of fat in the breast meat of WM could be attractive by consumer when compared with CB.

Protein Quality Evaluation of Cooked Hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri) Meats

  • Hwang, Eun-Young;Lee, Jin-Hwa;Ryu, Hong-Soo;Park, Nam-Gyu;Chun, Soon-Sil
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
    • /
    • v.7 no.3
    • /
    • pp.287-292
    • /
    • 2002
  • The effect of cooking methods on in vivo and in vivo indices of the protein quality of hagfish meat were investigated. In vivo protein digestibilities of cooked meats (81.3~83.5 %) were not significant different (p<0.05) from those of van meat (82.9%), with the exception of steamed (11$0^{\circ}C$, 15 min) meat (86.3 %). Convection oven cooking (22$0^{\circ}C$, IS min) resulted in a higher trypsin indigestible substrate (TIS, 49.2 mg/g solid) compared with that of raw meat (38.9 mg/g solid). free amino acid content of raw meat was decreased after boiling (10$0^{\circ}C$, 10min). Both convection oven and microwave cooking (2,450 MHz, 3 min) decreased available lysine from 4.9g/16g N to 3.8~4.1g/16g N. In vivo apparent protein digestibilites (AD) of hagfish meat were similar fur raw (92.4%) and cooked meats, but were somewhat lower than ANRC (Animal Nutrition Research Council) casein (945%). The PERs (3.7~4.1) and NPRs (3.7~4.9) of cooked meats were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those of raw meat (PER 3.3, NPR 3.6 and ANRC casein (PER 2.5, NPR 2.6), despite their lower in vivo protein digestibilities. These results demonstrate that cooking at optimal conditions resulted in remarkably positive effects on in vivo and in vivo protein qualities of hagfish meats. Therefore, steamed hagfish meat is an excellent source of high quality protein from seafood products.

Relationship between Myosin Isoforms and Meat Quality Traits in Pig Semitendinosus Neuromuscular Compartments

  • Graziotti, Guillermo H.;Menendez, Jose M. Rodriguez;Rios, Clara M.;Cossu, Maria E.;Bosco, Alexis;Affricano, Nestor O.;Ceschel, Alejandra Paltenghi;Moisa, Sonia;Basso, Lorenzo
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.24 no.1
    • /
    • pp.125-129
    • /
    • 2011
  • The aim was to determine the relationship between muscle structure and meat quality traits in neuromuscular compartments (NMCs: R1, R2, R3, R4) of pig semitendinosus muscle. Barrows from the INTA-MGC genetic line (Argentina) were slaughtered at 100 kg body weight. In each NMC the following parameters were determined: the fibre types I, IIA, IIX and IIB by immunohistochemistry, the fibre cross sectional area (FCSA), the pH of meat after 24 h post-mortem ($pH_{24}$), instrumental meat tenderness (WB) and colour ($L^*$, $a^*$, $b^*$). There were significant differences in the following: $L^*$ (R1 = R4$a^*$ (R1>R4>R2 = R3), $b^*$ (R1 = R4R1 = R3 = R4), $pH_{24}$ (R1 = R4>R2 = R3). The relative percentages of FCSA were as follows: I (R4>R1>R3>R2), IIA (R1>R4>R3>R2), IIX (R1 = R2 = R3 = R4) and IIB (R2>R3>R1>R4). The correlation values were statistically significant between IIB and WB (R1 and R4, $r_s$ = 0.66), (R2 and R3 $r_s$ = 0.74), IIB and $L^*$ (R1 and R4 $r_s$ = 0.84), IIX and $L^*$ without discriminating NMCs. Our data suggest that the NMC where the sampling takes place is important for determining meat quality traits because of the heterogeneity of the whole muscle.

Evaluation of Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Sensory Attributes of the Broiler Fed a Diet supplemented with Curry Leaves (Murraya koenigii)

  • Nuwan, K.A. Sameera;Wickramasuriya, Samiru Sudharaka;Jayasena, Dinesh D.;Tharangani, R.M. Himali;Song, Zhang;Yi, Young-Joo;Heo, Jung Min
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
    • /
    • v.43 no.3
    • /
    • pp.169-176
    • /
    • 2016
  • An experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth performance and meat quality traits of broilers fed a diet supplemented with dry-ground curry leaves (Murraya koenigii). A total of 750 one-day-old broiler chicks (Cobbs 500) were arranged in the experiment with a completely randomized design and allotted to one of five treatments, with $T_1-Control$ and $T_2-T_5$ curry leaves powder levels (i.e., 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9% and 1.2%, respectively). The initial body weights, final body weights and daily feed intake were measured over an experimental period of 32 days. At the conclusion of the experiment, the carcass weights and meat quality parameters were measured. The birds fed diets supplemented with curry leaves powder had a higher weight gain (P<0.05; ADG), improved feed conversion ratio (P<0.05; FCR) and lower mortality (P<0.05) rates compared to the birds in the control group. Nonetheless, there was no difference (P>0.05) in feed intake among the dietary treatments. Similarly, supplementation of curry leaves powder had no effect (P>0.05) on the proportions of the carcass, leg meat and drumstick. No differences were (P>0.05) observed in cooking loss or the pH of meat from broilers fed the curry leaves supplemented diet. However, curry leaf supplementation affected (P<0.05) the meat water holding capacity. A sensory evaluation showed higher levels of taste and tenderness in meat from broilers fed with curry leaves powder. In conclusion, our results suggested that curry leaves powder improved the growth performance of broilers, with a lower incidence of mortality and improvement of some meat qualities.

Effects of cooling water treatment with ionized calcium on calcium content and quality of fresh chicken meat in poultry slaughtering process (도계과정 중 이온화칼슘 냉침이 닭고기 신선도 및 칼슘 함량에 미치는 영향)

  • Choi, D.H.;Park, B.S.;Jin, J.Y.
    • Journal of the Korean Applied Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.33 no.3
    • /
    • pp.575-586
    • /
    • 2016
  • An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of cooling water treatment with ionized calcium on calcium content, extending the shelf-life and quality of fresh chicken meat in poultry slaughtering process. The subjects were divided into four groups: control (0% without ionized calcium) and treatment groups (0.5, 0.7, 0.9% ionized calcium). The results indicated that the cooling water treatment with ionized calcium exhibited the bacterial counts of $10^5CFU/cm^2$ in surface of chicken meat, and maintained the quality of fresh chicken meat with extending the shelf-life above seven days when compared with that of control group. The results found that the cooling water treatment with ionized calcium could produce the calcium enrichment of chicken meat as nine times higher in calcium content of chicken meat when compared with that of control group. pH, water holding capacity, TBARS (MDA mg/kg) in chicken meat via the cooling water treatment with ionized calcium showed 6.4, above 50, below 0.10, respectively, with preventing the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. Lightness ($L^*$) as a chicken meat color, shear force indicated above 60, below $1.70kg/0.5inch^2$, respectively.

The effects of breed and gender on meat quality of Duroc, Pietrain, and their crossbred

  • Kim, Jeong A;Cho, Eun Seok;Jeong, Yong Dae;Choi, Yo Han;Kim, Young Sin;Choi, Jung woo;Kim, Jin Soo;Jang, Aera;Hong, Joon Ki;Sa, Soo Jin
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.62 no.3
    • /
    • pp.409-419
    • /
    • 2020
  • This study evaluated the effects of breed and gender in Duroc (D), Pietrain (P), and crossbred (DP) pigs. Loin samples were collected from D (n = 79), P (n = 42), and DP (n = 45) pigs. Intramuscular fat content was significantly lower in P (p < 0.001), and pH was lowest in DP pigs (p < 0.001). Gilts had higher intramuscular fat (IMF) and pH values than did castrated males (p < 0.05). Water-holding capacity was lower in DP pigs than that in D and P pigs (p < 0.001). Shear force in DP pigs was higher than that in D and P pigs (p < 0.001). Lightness and yellowness of meat in DP pigs was increased compared with coloring of P pig meat (p < 0.01). Meat from DP pigs was redder compared with meat from in D and P pigs, and it was higher in gilts than in castrates (p < 0.001). The C16:0 content was lower in P and DP pigs than in D pigs (p < 0.01). C18:2 content was higher in P and DP pigs than in D pigs (p < 0.001). Unsaturated and saturated fatty acids increased in P pigs compared with levels in D pigs (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that meat quality can be controlled by crossbreeding to increase or reduce selected properties. This study provides the basic data on the meat characteristics of F1 DP pigs. Thus, further study should be conducted to estimate the meat quality of various crossbreeds.