• Title, Summary, Keyword: Meat quality

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Chemical Components and Meat Quality Traits Related to Palatability of Ten Primal Cuts from Hanwoo Carcasses

  • Jung, Eun-Young;Hwang, Young-Hwa;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.35 no.6
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    • pp.859-866
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    • 2015
  • To determine chemical components and meat quality traits related to palatability of 10 primal cuts, 25 Hanwoo carcasses were selected from 5 carcasses × 5 quality grades and used to obtain proximate data and meat quality characteristics. Significant differences (p<0.05) in chemical component and meat quality were found among the 10 primal cuts. The highest fat content was found in the kalbi, followed by dungsim, yangjee, chaekeut, ansim, abdari, suldo, moksim, udun, and satae. Protein and moisture contents in the 10 primal cuts were in reverse order of fat content. Moksim had the highest drip loss % and cooking loss % than all other primal cuts while kalbi showed the lowest (p<0.05) percentage of drip and cooking loss. Ansim had the longest sarcomere length but the lowest shear force values than all other cuts (p<0.05). The highest (p<0.05) score for overall acceptability was observed in ansim. Moksim, udun, abdari, and satae were rated the lowest (p<0.05) in overall acceptability among the 10 primal cuts from Hanwoo carcasses. In conclusion, ansim, dungsim, chaekeut, and kalbi had the highest overall acceptability due to their higher fat contents and lower shear force values.

The Quality of Modified Atmosphere Packaged Meat from Lambs Slaughtered at 50 and 100 Days of Age

  • Tanski, Zenon;Stanislaw, Milewski;Bozena, Zaleska
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.25 no.3
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    • pp.428-434
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    • 2012
  • The aim of this study was to determine the quality of modified atmosphere (MA) packaged meat from Pomeranian rams slaughtered at 50 and 100 days of age. Determined: chemical composition, physicochemical and sensory properties of meat, and the fatty acid profile of intramuscular fat. Meat from 100-d-old lambs was characterized by a significantly higher content of dry matter, total protein and crude fat, a darker color and higher physiological maturity ($p\leq0.01$). Meat from younger lambs was marked by a better water-holding capacity ($p\leq0.05$), a lower energy value and higher concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). An increase in the content of dry matter, total protein and ash, and energy value was noted in MA-stored meat. Meat pH decreased over MA storage and the sensory properties deteriorated. The studied meat remained safe from microbial contamination during storage.

Growth rate, carcass characteristics and meat quality of growing lambs fed buckwheat or maize silage

  • Keles, Gurhan;Kocaman, Veli;Ustundag, Ahmet Onder;Zungur, Asli;Ozdogan, Mursel
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.4
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    • pp.522-528
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    • 2018
  • Objective: This study evaluated inclusion of buckwheat silage to the diet of growing lambs in terms of meat quality as compared to maize silage. Methods: Buckwheat, rich in total phenols (TP, 33 g/kg dry matter [DM]), was harvested at the end of the milk stage and ensiled in 40 kg plastic bags after wilting (294 g/kg silage DM). A total of 18 growing lambs ($21.6{\pm}1.2$) were individually fed isonitrogenous and isoenergetic total mixed rations (TMR) for 75 d that either contained buckwheat or maize silage at DM proportions of 0.50. At the end of feeding trail all lambs were slaughtered to assess carcass characteristics and meat quality. Results: Buckwheat silage increased (p<0.01) the DM intake of lambs as compared to maize silage, but had no effects (p>0.05) on live weight gain and feed efficiency. Carcass weight, dressing percentage, meat pH, water holding capacity, cooking loss, shear force ($kg/cm^2$), and total viable bacteria count of meat did not differ (p>0.05) between the treatments. However, TP content of meat increased (p<0.001) by feeding buckwheat TMR. Feeding buckwheat TMR also decreased (p<0.05) the b* values of meat. Conclusion: The results provide that buckwheat silage is palatable and could successfully include TMR of growing lambs with no adverse effects on performance, carcass and meat quality. Additionally, feeding buckwheat silage to lambs offers increased TP in meat.

Carcass Traits Determining Quality and Yield Grades of Hanwoo Steers

  • Moon, S.S.;Hwang, I.H.;Jin, S.K.;Lee, J.G.;Joo, S.T.;Park, G.B.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.16 no.7
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    • pp.1049-1054
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    • 2003
  • A group of Hanwoo (Korean cattle) steers (n=14,386) was sampled from a commercial abattoir located in Seoul over one year period (spring, summer, autumn and winter) and their carcass traits were collected. Carcass traits assessed by an official meat grader comprised degree of marbling, meat color, fat color, texture and maturity for quality grade, and back fat thickness, ribeye area and carcass weight for yield grade. A heavier carcass with a higher marbling score, more red meat color and white fat color received better quality grade (p<0.05). Regression analysis showed that the marbling score was the strongest attribute (partial $R^2=0.88$) for quality grade. Lighter carcasses with a thinner back fat and larger ribeye area received higher yield grade score. The back fat thickness was the most negative determinant of yield grade (Partial $R^2=-0.66$). The slaughter season had a little effect on quality and yield grades. As slaughter weight increased, back fat thickness and ribeye area increased linearly, whereas marbling score reached its asymptotic level at approximately 570 kg. As a consequence, quality grade showed a considerable improvement up to 570 kg, but increases in slaughter weight afterward showed a little benefit on quality grade. There was a clear curvilinear relationship between slaughter weight and yield grade in that the yield grade reached its highest point at approximately 490 kg and decreased afterward. These results suggested that 570kg at the age of 24 months might be the economic slaughter weight for quality grade but 490 kg for yield grade.

Quality Characteristics of Beef Jerky Made with Beef Meat of Various Origin Places during Storage (원산지가 다른 쇠고기 육포의 저장 중 품질 특성)

  • Park, Gi-Hyung;Kwak, Eun-Jung;Lee, Young-Soon;Lee, Kyung-Hee
    • Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life
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    • v.17 no.1
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    • pp.81-88
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    • 2007
  • The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the quality of beef jerky made with Korean beef meat, Korean beef cattle and imported beef meat from Austria and New Zealand. The beef jerky qualities were evaluated by sensory evaluation, measurement of crude lipid, fatty acid composition of lipid, and acid value and peroxide value, and of surface observation with a microscope. According to the preference test, whereas beef jerky made with Korean beef meat showed the highest score in color, glaze, palatability, and softness, while that of made with New Zealand beef meat did received the lowest score. The crude lipid content of jerky made with Korean and Austrian beef meat was higher than that of made with Korean cattle and New Zealand beef meat. Surface of jerky made with Korean and Austrian beef meat was gappier than that of made with Korean cattle and New Zealand beef meat, and the. The acid value of jerky made with Korean and Austrian beef meat was lower than that of made with Korean cattle and New Zealand beef meat. The peroxide value of jerky made with Korean cattle meat showed higher peroxide values from the initial storage time. However, the peroxide value whereas that of jerky made with Austrian beef meat was the lowest at initial storage time, it increased remarkably with storage time and showed the highest value after the 15th day of storage. We found that the change in quality of jerky made with Korean and Austrian beef meat was less than that those made of Korean cattle and New zealand beef meat. And it could be suggested that Korean cattle and New Zealand beef meat are not suitable in making jerky.

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Meat analog as future food: a review

  • Ismail, Ishamri;Hwang, Young-Hwa;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Journal of Animal Science and Technology
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    • v.62 no.2
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    • pp.111-120
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    • 2020
  • The definition of meat analog refers to the replacement of the main ingredient with other than meat. It also called a meat substitute, meat alternatives, fake or mock meat, and imitation meat. The increased importance of meat analog in the current trend is due to the health awareness among consumers in their diet and for a better future environment. The factors that lead to this shift is due to low fat and calorie foods intake, flexitarians, animal disease, natural resources depletion, and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. Currently, available marketed meat analog products are plant-based meat in which the quality (i.e., texture and taste) are similar to the conventional meat. The ingredients used are mainly soy proteins with novel ingredients added, such as mycoprotein and soy leghemoglobin. However, plant-based meat is sold primarily in Western countries. Asian countries also will become a potential market in the near future due to growing interest in this product. With the current advance technology, lab-grown meat with no livestock raising or known as cultured meat will be expected to boost the food market in the future. Also, insect-based products will be promising to be the next protein resource for human food. Nevertheless, other than acceptability, cost-effective, reliable production, and consistent quality towards those products, product safety is the top priority. Therefore, the regulatory frameworks need to be developed alongside.

Effects of dietary marigold extract supplementation on growth performance, pigmentation, antioxidant capacity and meat quality in broiler chickens

  • Wang, Shuhao;Zhang, Lin;Li, Jiaolong;Cong, Jiahui;Gao, Feng;Zhou, Guanghong
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.30 no.1
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    • pp.71-77
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    • 2017
  • Objective: This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with marigold extract on growth performance, pigmentation, antioxidant capacity and meat quality in broiler chickens. Methods: A total of 320 one-day-old Arbor Acres chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups with 8 replicates of 8 chickens each. The chickens of control group were fed with basal diet and other experimental groups were fed with basal diet supplemented with 0.075%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.60% marigold extract respectively (the corresponding concentrations of lutein were 15, 30, 60, and 120 mg/kg). Results: The results showed that marigold extract supplementation increased the yellowness values of shank, beak, skin and muscle and the redness ($a^*$) value of thigh muscle (linear, p<0.01). Marigold extract supplementation significantly increased the total antioxidant capacity, and the activities of superoxide dismutase in liver and thigh muscle (linear, p<0.01) and significantly decreased the malondialdehyde contents of liver and thigh muscle (linear, p<0.01). Marigold extract supplementation significantly decreased the drip loss and shear force of thigh muscles (linear, p<0.01). There was no significant effect on growth performance with marigold extract supplementation. Conclusion: In conclusion, dietary supplementation of marigold extract significantly increased the yellowness values of carcass, antioxidant capacity and meat quality in broiler chickens.

Consumer Acceptability of Intramuscular Fat

  • Frank, Damian;Joo, Seon-Tea;Warner, Robyn
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.36 no.6
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    • pp.699-708
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    • 2016
  • Fat in meat greatly improves eating quality, yet many consumers avoid visible fat, mainly because of health concerns. Generations of consumers, especially in the English-speaking world, have been convinced by health authorities that animal fat, particularly saturated or solid fat, should be reduced or avoided to maintain a healthy diet. Decades of negative messages regarding animal fats has resulted in general avoidance of fatty cuts of meat. Paradoxically, low fat or lean meat tends to have poor eating quality and flavor and low consumer acceptability. The failure of low-fat high-carbohydrate diets to curb "globesity" has prompted many experts to re-evaluate of the place of fat in human diets, including animal fat. Attitudes towards fat vary dramatically between and within cultures. Previous generations of humans sought out fatty cuts of meat for their superior sensory properties. Many consumers in East and Southeast Asia have traditionally valued more fatty meat cuts. As nutritional messages around dietary fat change, there is evidence that attitudes towards animal fat are changing and many consumers are rediscovering and embracing fattier cuts of meat, including marbled beef. The present work provides a short overview of the unique sensory characteristics of marbled beef and changing consumer preferences for fat in meat in general.

Effect of Dietary Supplementation of Bioactive Peptides on Antioxidant Potential of Broiler Breast Meat and Physicochemical Characteristics of Nuggets

  • Aslam, Sadia;Shukat, Rizwan;Khan, Muhammad Issa;Shahid, Muhammad
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.40 no.1
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    • pp.55-73
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    • 2020
  • Poultry meat is generally exposed to quality deterioration due to lipid oxidation during storage. Oxidative stability of meat can be increased by feed supplementation. Aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of fish waste derived bioactive peptides on antioxidant potential of broiler breast meat and physico-chemical characteristics and quality parameters of nuggets prepared from breast meat. 180 broiler birds (six groups of 30 birds) were purchased. Each group was given different concentrations of bioactive peptides i.e. 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg/kg feed. After completion of six weeks birds were slaughtered and breast meat was stored at -18℃ for six months. Nuggets were prepared and stored at -18℃ for 45 days. Meat samples were analyzed for antioxidant activity [total phenolic contents (TPC), DPPH· scavenging activity, and ferric reducing antioxidant power] and lipid oxidation assay at regular intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 months while nuggets were analyzed for quality (pH, color, texture and water holding capacity) parameters after regular interval of 15 days. A significant (p<0.05) effect of feed supplementation was observed on antioxidant status such as TPC, DPPH· scavenging activity, and FRAP of broiler breast meat. Dietary interventions of bioactive peptides significantly (p<0.05) delayed lipid oxidation of breast meat than control. All the quality parameters were also significantly affected due to dietary bioactive peptides and storage duration. Thus, dietary interventions of bioactive peptides can increase the antioxidant and shelf stability of broiler breast meat and nuggets.

Meat Quality and Storage Characteristics Depending on PSE Status of Broiler Breast Meat

  • Chae, H.S.;Singh, N.K.;Yoo, Y.M.;Ahn, C.N.;Jeong, S.G.;Ham, J.S.;Kim, D.H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.20 no.4
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    • pp.582-587
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    • 2007
  • The pale, soft, exudative (PSE) syndrome lowers storage quality and consumers acceptability in the particular meat. With the increase in the consumption of parted chickens in Korean meat consumption trade, a parallel increase in the concern over the PSE status of chickens have been noticed. The present study focused on the PSE status of broiler's breast to investigate the effects of different degrees of PSE on its quality and storage characteristics. A total of 46 broiler chickens of 35 days old averaging 1,251-1,350 g were selected for the study. Breast separated and skin was removed. The breast meat was stored at $4^{\circ}C$ for 3 days and were analysed for pH, lightness, yellowness, redness, shear force, water-holding capacity (WHC), cooking loss, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and Volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) on day 1 and 3 during the storage. Increase in the degree of broilers breast PSE during storage caused fall in pH and shear force and increase in lightness, cooking loss, TBARS, VBN. Broilers breast PSE status confirms the actual pale soft and exudative nature of meat.