• Title, Summary, Keyword: Lactating Dairy Cows

Search Result 195, Processing Time 0.042 seconds

Influence of Mentha×piperita L. (Peppermint) Supplementation on Nutrient Digestibility and Energy Metabolism in Lactating Dairy Cows

  • Hosoda, K.;Nishida, T.;Park, W.Y.;Eruden, B.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.18 no.12
    • /
    • pp.1721-1726
    • /
    • 2005
  • The characteristic smell of cow milk was suppressed when herbs were consumed by lactating dairy cows. But it is unclear whether or not peppermint ingestion affects the nutritional and milk production parameters in lactating dairy cows. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of peppermint feeding to lactating dairy cows on nutrient digestibility, energy metabolism, ruminal fermentation and milk production. Eight Holstein cows were given a diet supplemented with or without 5% of dried peppermint per diet on a dry matter basis. The digestion of nutrients from cows fed the diet with peppermint was significantly lower than that of the control group. Energy loss as methane and methane released from cows receiving the peppermint treatment was significantly lower than that in the control cows. Peppermint feeding to cows resulted in the promotion of thermogenesis. However, ruminal fermentation and milk production were not affected by peppermint feeding. In conclusion, peppermint ingestion by lactating dairy cows reduces the nutrient digestibility and methanogenesis, and changes energy metabolism.

Feeding of Sugar Cane Silage to Dairy Cattle during the Dry Season

  • Suksombat, Wisitiporn;Junpanichcharoen, P.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.18 no.8
    • /
    • pp.1125-1129
    • /
    • 2005
  • A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding sugar cane silage compared to chopped whole sugar cane or grass silage on performances of lactating dairy cows during the dry season. Twenty four Holstein Friesian crossbred (>87.5% Holstein Friesian) lactating dairy cows in mid lactation; averaging 15.4${\pm}$3.2 kg of milk, 120${\pm}$23 days in milk, 50.5${\pm}$6.5 months old and 432${\pm}$39 kg live weight, were stratified for milk yield, days in milk, age, stage of lactation and body weight, and then randomly allocated to three treatment groups (8 cows in each group). All cows were fed 7.5 kg/d commercial concentrate plus ad libitum roughage according to treatment groups, which were grass silage, sugar cane silage or chopped whole sugar cane respectively. All cows consumed similar DM and produced similar milk and milk composition yields. However, cows on grass silage lost more weight than the other cows. The present study indicated that, during the dry season, sugar cane silage can be fed to lactating dairy cows, while giving similar milk yield to grass silage or chopped whole sugar cane.

Effect of Short-distance Walking Activity on Milk Production and Metabolic Status of Lactating Dairy Cows

  • Lim, Dong-Hyun;Kim, Tae-Il;Kim, Hyun-Jong;Kim, Sang-Beom;Park, Seong-Min;Park, Ji-Hoo;Ha, Seong-Min;Lee, Ji-Hwan;Lim, Hyun-Joo;Jeong, Ha-Yeon;Mayakrishnan, Vijayakumar
    • Journal of The Korean Society of Grassland and Forage Science
    • /
    • v.38 no.4
    • /
    • pp.343-348
    • /
    • 2018
  • In this study, the effect of daily short-distance walking exercise on milk production and metabolic status of the lactating dairy cows was investigated. The experiment was conducted with 10 lactating dairy cows comprising 2 groups (5 dairy cows/group), which were walking activity and non-walking activity. The walking activity (WA) group lactating dairy cows walked outdoors for 1 km/d, and the non-walking activity (non-WA) lactating dairy cows were maintained within a cowshed from $18^{th}$ April to $30^{th}$ May. The activity volume of the neck was not significantly different between the groups, but the activity volume of the leg was higher in WA group compared with non-WA (p<0.05). The rectal temperature was higher in the WA group ($38.6^{\circ}C$) compared with non-WA ($38.2^{\circ}C$) (p<0.05). No significant differences in dietary NE intake, milk production and milk composition were found between the groups. The plasma cortisol concentration was higher in WA group ($2.14{\mu}g/dl$) compared to non-WA ($0.95{\mu}g/dl$) (p<0.05). However, plasma cortisol level of WA dairy cows was significantly decreased as compared with non-WA cows. On the contrary, the level of plasma melatonin was increased in WA cows than that of non-WA dairy cows. It may be interpreted as a change in physical fitness. From this study, we suggest that walking activity can be improved energy balance. Further investigation is needed to determine whether different combinations of distance, rate or doing in morning or afternoon will stimulate energy balance.

Feeding of Whole Sugar Cane to Dairy Cattle during the Dry Season

  • Suksombat, W.;Mernkrathoke, P.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.18 no.3
    • /
    • pp.345-349
    • /
    • 2005
  • A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding chopped whole sugar cane compared to corn silage on performances of dairy cows during the dry season. Twenty four Holstein Friesian crossbred (>87.5% Holstein Friesian) lactating dairy cows in mid lactation; averaging 16.5${\pm}$2.0 kg of milk, 121${\pm}$22 days in milk, 54.5${\pm}$4.5 months old and 440${\pm}$31 kg live weight, were stratified for milk yield, days in milk, age, stage of lactation and body weight, and then randomly allocated to two treatment groups (12 cows in each group). The first group was fed corn silage together with commercial concentrate while the second group was fed chopped whole sugar cane together with commercial concentrate. All cows consumed similar DM, however, cows on corn silage consumed more CP while cows on chopped whole sugar cane consumed more $NE_{LP}$. No significant differences in performances between the two groups were observed except for final live weight and body weight change. Cows on chopped whole sugar cane showed higher final live weight and gained more weight than cows on corn silage. The present study clearly indicates that chopped whole sugar cane can be fed to lactating dairy cows, while giving similar milk yield to corn silage.

Liver metabolic perturbations of heat-stressed lactating dairy cows

  • Fan, Caiyun;Su, Di;Tian, He;Li, Xiaojiao;Li, Yu;Ran, Lei;Hu, Ruiting;Cheng, Jianbo
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.31 no.8
    • /
    • pp.1244-1251
    • /
    • 2018
  • Objective: The objective of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying liver metabolic perturbations in dairy cows exposed to heat stress (HS). Methods: Liquid chromatography massabl spectrometry was used to analyze metabolic differences in livers of 20 dairy cows, with and without exposure to HS. Results: The results revealed 33 potential metabolite candidate biomarkers for the detection of HS in dairy cows. Fifteen of these metabolites (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, acetoacetate, ${\beta}$-hydroxybutyrate, fumaric acid, citric acid, choline, glycine, proline, isoleucine, leucine, urea, creatinine, and orotic acid) were previously found to be potential biomarkers of HS in plasma or milk, discriminating dairy cows with and without HS. Conclusion: All the potential diagnostic biomarkers were involved in glycolysis, amino acid, ketone, tricarboxylic acid, or nucleotide metabolism, indicating that HS mainly affected energy and nucleotide metabolism in lactating dairy cows.

Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Status during Transition Period in Dairy Cows

  • Sharma, N.;Singh, N.K.;Singh, O.P.;Pandey, V.;Verma, P.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.24 no.4
    • /
    • pp.479-484
    • /
    • 2011
  • The study was conducted on 20 Holstein X Sahiwal cross bred dairy cows, with an average milk production of $2,752{\pm}113.79$ liters in $284{\pm}5.75$ days during a single lactation, that were divided in to two groups of 10 animals. We investigated the oxidative stress and antioxidant status during the transition period in dairy cows. In this study, plasma level of MDA was considered as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and SOD, catalase, GSH and GSHPx as antioxidants. The lipid peroxidation was significantly (p<0.001) higher in cows during early lactation as compared to the cows in advanced pregnancy. A significant positive correlation (r = +0.831, p<0.01) was determined between MDA and catalase in early lactating cows. In early lactating cows, blood glutathione was significantly lower than in advanced pregnant cows. However, early lactating cows showed non-significant negative correlation for all antioxidant enzymes with lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, dairy cows seemed to have more oxidative stress and low antioxidant defense during early lactation or just after parturition than advanced pregnant cows, and this appears to be the reason for their increased susceptibility to production diseases (e.g. mastitis, metritis, retention of fetal membranes etc.) and other health problems.

Study of plasma β-carotene concentration in dairy cows (젖소의 혈장 베타카로틴 농도 조사)

  • Nam, Hyang-mi;Moon, Jin-san;Joo, Yi-seok;Oh, Tae-ho;Park, Yong-ho;Han, Hong-ryul
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
    • /
    • v.39 no.5
    • /
    • pp.1021-1027
    • /
    • 1999
  • This study was carried out to determine the effects of ${\beta}-carotene$ on the control of mastitis in dairy cows during the dry period. The relationship between the levels of plasma ${\beta}-carotene$ and the status of udder health in Holstein dairy cows were investigated. Blood samples were collected from 117 cows to compare the levels of plasma ${\beta}-carotene$ in lactating cows. The levels of plasma ${\beta}-carotene$ were $1.82{\mu}g/ml$ in healthy cows(n = 65) and $1.12{\mu}g/ml$ in mastitic cows(n = 52), respectively(p < 0.01). In the experiment to compare the level of plasma ${\beta}-carotene$ in the cows at different stages of lactation, the plasma ${\beta}-carotene$ levels were $1.73{\mu}g/ml$ in lactating cows(n = 22), $1.29{\mu}g/ml$ in nonlactating cows(n = 35) and $0.43{\mu}g/ml$ in cows after calving(n = 16)(p < 0.05).

  • PDF

Effects of low dietary cation-anion difference induced by ruminal ammonium chloride infusion on performance, serum, and urine metabolites of lactating dairy cows

  • Wang, Kun;Nan, Xuemei;Zhao, Puyi;Liu, Wei;Drackley, James K.;Liu, Shijie;Zhang, Kaizhan;Bu, Dengpan
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.31 no.5
    • /
    • pp.677-685
    • /
    • 2018
  • Objective: The objective of the present study was to determine ammonium chloride tolerance of lactating dairy cows, by examining effects of negative dietary cation anion difference (DCAD) induced by ruminal ammonium chloride infusion on performance, serum and urine minerals, serum metabolites and enzymes of lactating dairy cows. Methods: Four primiparous lactating Chinese Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were infused with increasing amounts (0, 150, 300, or 450 g/d) of ammonium chloride in a crossover design. The DCAD of the base diet was 279 mEq/kg dry matter (DM) using the DCAD formula (Na + K - Cl - S)/kg of DM. Ammonium chloride infusion added the equivalent of 0, 128, 330, and 536 mEq/kg DM of Cl in treatments. According to the different dry matter intakes (DMI), the resulting actual DCAD of the four treatments was 279, 151, -51, and -257 mEq/kg DM, respectively. Results: DMI decreased linearly as DCAD decreased. Yields of milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, energy-corrected milk, milk fat, and milk protein decreased linearly as DCAD decreased. Concentrations of milk protein and milk urea nitrogen increased linearly with decreasing DCAD. Concentration of Cl- in serum increased linearly and concentration of PO43- in serum increased quadratically as DCAD decreased. Urine pH decreased linearly and calculated urine volume increased linearly with decreasing DCAD. Linear increases in daily urinary excretion of $Cl^-$, $Ca^{2+}$, $PO_4{^{3-}}$, urea N, and ammonium were observed as DCAD decreased. Activities of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and ${\gamma}-glutamyl$ transferase in serum and urea N concentration in serum increased linearly as DCAD decreased. Conclusion: In conclusion, negative DCAD induced by ruminal ammonium chloride infusion resulted in a metabolic acidosis, had a negative influence on performance, and increased serum enzymes indicating potential liver and kidney damage in lactating dairy cows. Daily ammonium chloride intake by lactating dairy cows should not exceed 300 g, and 150 g/d per cow may be better.

The Use of Sugarcane Stalk for Feeding Lactating Cows

  • Kawashima, T.;Sumamal, W.;Pholsen, P.;Chaithiang, R.;Boonpakdee, W.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.15 no.2
    • /
    • pp.205-208
    • /
    • 2002
  • The use of chopped sugarcane stalk (CSS) as a roughage for lactating cows was examined using four Holstein crossbred cows in a private dairy farm in Khon Kaen, Thailand, in comparison with rice straw (RS), which is the conventional roughage in the dry season in the region. Cows were subjected to the following two dietary treatments: Diet 1) RS with commercial concentrate feed, and Diet 2) CSS and RS with commercial concentrate feed. The diet was switched over every 3 weeks. The amount of concentrate was determined by the experience of the owner of the cows. RS and CSS were given ad libitum. There was no difference in milk production between two groups, although the total DMI was less in cows fed CSS. Solid-not-fat (SNF) content in milk was significantly higher in the cows given CSS. The NEFA content was significantly lower in the animals given CSS, which suggested that cows given only RS as roughage would be suffering from energy malnutrition. Therefore, it was considered that CSS feeding improved energy supply, which resulted in higher SNF in milk. In the nutritional point of view, the present study clearly showed CSS can be used as a roughage for dairy cows in the dry season.

EFFECTS OF FRUCTO-OLIGOSACCHARIDES ON MILK-YIELD AND MILK-COMPONENTS OF DAIRY COWS

  • Kobayashi, S.;Eida, T.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.3 no.1
    • /
    • pp.21-25
    • /
    • 1990
  • Fructo-oligosaccharides are found in many plants, such as onion, burdock and wheat. They are not well hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes in animals, but are peculiarly assimilated by Bifidobacterium and some useful bacteria. In our previous experiment (Kobayashi et al., 1987) it was suggested that they were effective in decreasing energy loss in the metabolism of dairy calves. In the present study, the effects of fructo-oligosaccharides on body weight, milk-yield and milk-components (fat, protein and solids-not-fat) were investigated in dairy cows. Lactating cows were fed a standard diet containing fructoligo saccharides at 18.70g, 9.35g and 0.0g (control) per 100kg body weight, day for three weeks. Neither treatments significantly affected any of the parameters examined. The fructo-oligosaccharides were assumed to be hydrolyzed by rumen microorganisms and hardly to affect the bacterium florae in the intestines of the lactating cows.