• Title, Summary, Keyword: Korean wild boar

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The Robust Phylogeny of Korean Wild Boar (Sus scrofa coreanus) Using Partial D-Loop Sequence of mtDNA

  • Cho, In-Cheol;Han, Sang-Hyun;Fang, Meiying;Lee, Sung-Soo;Ko, Moon-Suck;Lee, Hang;Lim, Hyun-Tae;Yoo, Chae-Kyoung;Lee, Jun-Heon;Jeon, Jin-Tae
    • Molecules and Cells
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    • v.28 no.5
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    • pp.423-430
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    • 2009
  • In order to elucidate the precise phylogenetic relationships of Korean wild boar (Sus scrofa coreanus), a partial mtDNA D-loop region (1,274 bp, NC_000845 nucleotide positions 16576-1236) was sequenced among 56 Korean wild boars. In total, 25 haplotypes were identified and classified into four distinct subgroups (K1 to K4) based on Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An extended analysis, adding 139 wild boars sampled worldwide, confirmed that Korean wild boars clearly belong to the Asian wild boar cluster. Unexpectedly, the Myanmarese/Thai wild boar population was detected on the same branch as Korean wild boar subgroups K3 and K4. A parsimonious median-joining network analysis including all Asian wild boar haplotypes again revealed four maternal lineages of Korean wild boars, which corresponded to the four Korean wild boar subgroups identified previously. In an additional analysis, we supplemented the Asian wild boar network with 34 Korean and Chinese domestic pig haplotypes. We found only one haplotype, C31, that was shared by Chinese wild, Chinese domestic and Korean domestic pigs. In contrast to our expectation that Korean wild boars contributed to the gene pool of Korean native pigs, these data clearly suggest that Korean native pigs would be introduced from China after domestication from Chinese wild boars.

Habitat preference of wild boar (Sus scrofa) for feeding in cool-temperate forests

  • Kim, Youngjin;Cho, Soyeon;Choung, Yeonsook
    • Journal of Ecology and Environment
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    • v.43 no.3
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    • pp.297-304
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    • 2019
  • Background: The growing wild boar population has become a social issue and its feeding characteristics could affect the physical condition and the plant species composition in the South Korean forests. We aimed to reveal the preference of the wild boar on forest type and site condition as feeding grounds in two cool-temperate forested national parks, Odaesan and Seoraksan, in order to provide information to manage the growing population. Results: The 75 plots (53.6%) out of 140 plots were used as feeding grounds by the wild boar, implying a considerably large population. Especially, the observation frequency as feeding ground was the highest in Quercus forests (73.3%), and it was significantly more preferred than deciduous forest type (44.2%) and coniferous forest type (32.4%) (${\chi}^2=17.591$, p < 0.001). Significantly more and deeper pits were found in Quercus forests. Moreover, high elevation and gentle slope ridge were relatively preferred regardless of forest distribution. Conclusions: South Korean forests are growing qualitatively and quantitatively. Particularly, Quercus forest area has increased markedly, while coniferous forest area has decreased. Since the Quercus forest provides rich food sources for the wild boar, the enlargement of this forest type is expected to increase the wild boar population. The forests located at high elevations have high species diversity, and it is expected that these forests will be greatly affected by the increase in the wild boar population as preferred feeding grounds.

Comparison of antibiotic resistance profiles for Escherichia coli isolated from wild boar and domestic pig fecal samples

  • Yoo, Sung J.;Sunwoo, Sun Young;Seo, Sang Won;Lyoo, Young S.
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.55 no.1
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    • pp.41-46
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    • 2015
  • Increasing presence of wild boar around cities and suburban areas is a growing concern with respect to agronomy, environmental ecology, and public safety. In this study, antibiotic resistance profiles of Escherichia (E.) coli isolated from wild boar and domestic pig fecal samples were compared. Eighty E. coli samples were isolated from wild boars. Resistance of the bacteria to 14 common antimicrobial agents used in human and veterinary medicine was evaluated. Ninety-five E. coli isolates from domestic pig farms were used for comparison. Common and distinct antibiotic resistance patterns were observed when comparing wild boar and domestic pig isolates, indicating that wild boars may significantly influence environmental microbiology.

Spargana in a Weasel, Mustela sibirica manchurica, and a Wild Boar, Sus scrofa, from Gangwon-do, Korea

  • Lee, Seung-Ha;Choe, Eun-Yoon;Shin, Hyun-Duk;Seo, Min
    • The Korean Journal of Parasitology
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    • v.51 no.3
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    • pp.379-381
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    • 2013
  • To know the status of sparganum (plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei) infection in the Korean wild life, several species of wild animals were captured in Gangwon-do and examined for their status of infection with spargana. From February to December 2011, a total of 62 wild boars, 5 badgers, 1 weasel, 1 Siberian chipmunk, and 53 wild rodents were captured, and their whole muscles were examined with naked eyes for the presence of spargana worms. From the weasel and 1 wild boar, a total of 5 spargana specimens were extracted. The weasel was for the first time recorded as an intermediate or paratenic/transport host of S. erinacei in Korea, and both the weasel (Mustela sibirica manchurica) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) were added to the list of wild animals carrying spargana.

Prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis E virus in wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Korea

  • Park, Yu-Ri;Park, Ji-Young;Kang, Dae-Young;Han, Do-Hyun;Yoon, Hachung;Jeong, Wooseog;An, Dong-Jun;Yeo, Sang-Geon;Park, Choi-Kyu
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Service
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    • v.39 no.4
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    • pp.267-270
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    • 2016
  • We determined the nationwide seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in the wild boar population in Korea. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results showed that 42% of the 528 wild boars that were hunted between 2013 and 2014 were anti-HEV antibody positive. Furthermore, all Korean provinces showed an HEV seroprevalence between 9.8% and 51.1%, suggesting that wild boar HEV infection occurs throughout the country. Importantly, infected wild boar could act as a potential reservoir for HEV and could aid transmission to other animals and humans.

Seroprevalence of Trichinella sp. in Wild Boars (Sus scrofa) from Yanggu-gun, Gangwon-do, Korea

  • Lee, Hye-Jung;Chung, Ok-Sik;Kim, Jae-Lip;Lee, Seung-Ha;Yoo, Young-Bok;Seo, Min
    • The Korean Journal of Parasitology
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    • v.53 no.2
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    • pp.233-236
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    • 2015
  • A total 7 outbreaks of trichinellosis have occurred in Korea, mostly as a result of consumption of raw wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat. Since only 1 serological survey on wild boars had yet been performed in Korea, the present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of trichinellosis in wild boars and some species of rodents by artificial digestion and serological examinations in Yanggu-gun, Gangwon-do, the endemic area of trichinellosis. Both the wild boar and rodent muscle samples revealed no Trichinella larvae by direct examination and artificial digestion method. However, serological examinations revealed that 4 wild boar sera samples out of 118 (3.4%) were positive to Trichinella antigen. Although the recovery of Trichinella larvae ended in a failure, it is proved for the first time that the sylvatic cycle of Trichinella has been maintained in wild boars of Gangwon-do, Korea.

Diet of The Wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Agricultural Land of Geochang, Gyeongnam Province, Korea (경남 거창 농경지 멧돼지(Sus scrofa)의 식이물 분석)

  • Lee, Seong-Min;Lee, Woo-Shin
    • Journal of Korean Society of Forest Science
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    • v.103 no.2
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    • pp.307-312
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    • 2014
  • Wild boar have increased in recent years in Korea where damage to agricultural crops is considered as a social issue. The ecological studies on wild boar are essential for the effective management in the future. During May and December 2012, We collected 79 wild boar stomach samples from culling program implementation to reduce agricultural damage in Geochang County and analyzed stomach contents to figure out wild boar diet habit and which crop was preferred. There was seasonal variation in the diet. Plant foods represented up to 93.5% of the diet and were consumed more frequently than animal foods. Invertebrates occurred with high frequency but were underestimated in dry weight because they are rapidly digested. Agricultural crops consumed comprised mainly chestnuts(33%), rice(33%), and apples(24%). Agricultural crops are also a potentially important food resources for wild boar. The frequency of occurrence of earthworms was 50% of diet. Earthworm consumption generally increased in summer, and then decreased in winter. Our results show that wild boar can be considered an omnivore whose diet consists of plant and animal foods. To reduce wild boar agricultural damages, We have to focus on the prevention effort to rice paddy adjacent to chestnut forest and to apple orchard.

Prevalence of Emergency Traumatic Injuries in 100 Wild Boar Hunting Dogs (100마리의 야생 멧돼지 사냥견에서 응급 외상성 질환의 분류)

  • Ko, Jae-Jin;Kim, Se-Hoon;Ji, Joong-Ryong;Shim, Kwan-Seob;Kim, Nam-Soo
    • Journal of Veterinary Clinics
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    • v.27 no.6
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    • pp.718-722
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    • 2010
  • To investigate patterns and severity of hunting-related emergency traumatic injuries in wild boar hunting dogs. One hundred wild boar hunting dogs with emergency traumatic injuries sustained during wild boar hunting as a result of wild boar attack and accidental shooting of ensnarement in a trap. The retrospective study involved 100 dogs brought to CAMC for treatment of emergency traumatic injury sustained during wild boar hunting in Jeon-buk province from August 2007 to April 2008. Medical information obtained from the medical records included signalment; cause of injury; number, location and severity of injuries; and mortality. The 100 patients displayed 136 injuries (single injury in 71 dogs and multiple injuries in 29 dogs). Causes of the emergency traumatic injuries were wild boar attack (n = 92), accidental shooting (n = 7), and entrapment (n = 1). The thoracic area was the most common site of injury. The most common injury severity score (ISS) was code 2. The mortality rate was 9%, and all deaths involved thoracic injury. Emergency traumatic injuries sustained during wild boar hunting are most commonly thoracic injuries caused by prey attack. The nature of the injuries can differ from those typically encountered by small animal veterinarians.

Sperm Fertility of Transgenic Boar Harboring hEPO Gene is Decreased

  • Park Chun-Gyu;Kim Sung-Woo;Lee Poong-Yeon;Han Joo-Hee;Lee Hyun-Gi;Byun Sung-June;Yang Boh-Suk;Lee Chang-Hyung;Lee Hoon-Taek;Chang Won-Kyong;Park Jin-Ki
    • Reproductive and Developmental Biology
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    • v.30 no.1
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    • pp.27-34
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    • 2006
  • This study was conducted to compare the reproduction ability of the wild type boar and recombinant human erythropoietin (hEPO) transgenic boar semen. Ejaculated boar semen was analyzed by flow cytometry, Elisa and IVF methods. In experiment 1, flow cytometric analysis showed that the live sperm ratio of transgenic boar sperm significantly lower (P<0.05) than that of wild type boar after incubation at 20, 22, 24 and 26 hr. In experiment 2, the presence and levels of various cytokines (IL-6, IL-10 and $TNF-{\alpha}$) to related animal reproduction in the seminal and blood plasma were examined using specific enzyme immunoassay. There was no significant difference between both groups. In experiment 3, the fertilizing capacity and developmental ability of both boar sperm were compared. The transgenic boar sperm had a significantly low capacity of penetration, sperm-zona binding, embryo development, and blastocyst formation compared to wild type sperm (P<0.05). These results suggest that transgenic boar sperm harboring hEPO gene has low sperm viability than wild type boar, and it is a reason to decrease of fertility and litter size.

An osteological study of animal bones excavated from Jeju Jongdali shell-mount (제주 종달리패총 유적에서 출토된 동물 유물의 해부학적 연구)

  • Shin, Taekyun
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.41 no.3
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    • pp.275-279
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    • 2001
  • The classification of bony pieces which were excavated from Jongdali archaeological site in Jeju was studied. The total number of bone remains were 81 pieces, in which 31 pieces were classified into animal bones. The animal species consisted of Cervus spp., Sus scrofa, Bos taurus and Equus caballus. This finding suggests that the major fauna in this peroid(B.C. 100 - A.D. 100) is wild boar, deer, horse and cattle.

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