• Title, Summary, Keyword: Joseon Dynasty

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A Literature Review on the Types and Cooking Methods of Soondae during the Joseon Dynasty (조선시대 순대의 종류 및 조리방법에 대한 문헌적 고찰)

  • Oh, Soon-Duk
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.27 no.4
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    • pp.340-345
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    • 2012
  • This article examines the types and cooking methods of Soondae (Korean Traditional Sausage) as recorded in 12 books of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1909). The ingredients used in Soondae during the Joseon dynasty were dog meat, beef, pork, lamb, and fish. There were no recorded mentions of Soondae in the early Joseon dynasty, but by the middle period there were three different dishes recorded. By the late era of the Joseon dynasty that number had increased to twelve. During the middle era of the Joseon dynasty, one kind of Soondae was prepared using dog meat, one using beef, and one using pork. By the late Joseon dynasty, there were six types of Soondae prepared using beef. They also had three kinds of Soondae prepared using lamb and two using fish, one using pork by that time. The frequency of the Soondae ingredients during the Joseon dynasty in order were beef (46.7%), lamb (20%), pork (13.3%), fish (13.3%), and dog meat (6.7%). Further study will be conducted on recipes and ingredients recorded in these old books to develop a standardized recipe in order to make Soondae appealing to a global palate.

A Research on the Disease of King Heonjong in the Joseon Dynasty (조선시대(朝鮮時代) 헌종(憲宗)의 질병(疾病)에 관한 고찰)

  • Kim, Hoon;Lee, Hai-Woong
    • Journal of Korean Medical classics
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    • v.23 no.1
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    • pp.115-124
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    • 2010
  • King Heonjong was the twenty-fourth King of the Joseon Dynasty. He took the throne when he was only 8 years old, and had to go through power politics of maternal relations. During his period, situations worsened in both domestic and foreign affairs, meaning the beginning fall of the Joseon Dynasty. In respect to the diseases and treatments of King Heonjong, there appeared very few articles compared with the previous Kings, in the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, the Journal of Royal Secretariat, and the Diary of Kings of the Joseon Dynasty. He caught small pox and recovered in 10 days at the age of 17. Some articles showed that he suffered from symptom of indigestion, dyspepsia and edema. He died at 23 and had no descendants. We assume that the cause of death was due to worsening of kidney failure.

A Study on Medical Persons in King Sejong Period - Based on The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty - (조선(朝鮮) 세종대(世宗代) 의원(醫員) 연구 - 『조선왕조실록(朝鮮王朝實錄)』을 중심으로 -)

  • Song, Jichung;Eom, Dongmyung
    • Journal of Korean Medical classics
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    • v.28 no.3
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    • pp.79-88
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    • 2015
  • Objectives : The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty has plenty of articles as primary historical records. The Korean medical historiy researches have also been driven from The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty. About public services in Joseon dynasty related to medicine, We rarely know persons in public services, titles, levels and so on. Methods : I focused on The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty to research the titles of person in public services in early Joseon dynasty. I found 33 persons related to medicine and reorganized 21 persons who had titles. Results : I got 10 titles of public medical services and more than 15 titles of public non-medical services, which were received according to their medical services and 6 grades. Conclusions : I concluded that there were much more titles of public medical services than what we had already known and several titles and grades of public non-medical services, which were received according to their medical services.

A Literature Review of Dasik in the Joseon Dynasty Royal Palace (조선왕조 궁중음식(宮中飮食) 중 다식류(茶食類)의 문헌적 고찰)

  • Oh, Soon-Duk
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.27 no.3
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    • pp.316-323
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    • 2012
  • This study examined the prevalence of the traditional pressed sweet called dasik recorded in 15 Joseon dynasty (1392-1909) royal palace studies. The ingredients used in Dasik during the Joseon dynasty were categorized into 43% cereal powders, 18.6% tree fruits, 17.4% flower powders, 11.6% root clods, 8.2% dry-fish beef powders, and 1.2% vegetables. In the early era of the Joseon dynasty there were no reports of dasik in the royal palace. In the middle era of the Joseon dynasty there was one report of dasik in the royal palace. But in the late era of the Joseon dynasty there were 85 kinds of dasik reported in the royal palace. The most common ingredients were, most common first, Song-wha (松花), Huek-im (黑荏), Hwang-yul (黃栗), Nok-mal (菉末), and chungtae (靑太). The appearance and taste of dasik varied greatly throughout the time period, eventually resulting in nutrient supplementation. This observation may be associated with the commercial industrial development that prevailed during the late Joseon dynasty. Further investigation will be conducted on the recipes and ingredients recorded in these old studies to develop a standardized recipe for the globalization of dasik.

A Literature Review on the Types and Cooking Methods for Dasik during the Joseon Dynasty (조선시대 다식류의 종류 및 조리방법에 대한 문헌적 고찰)

  • Oh, Soon-Duk
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.26 no.1
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    • pp.39-52
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    • 2011
  • This study examined the types and cooking methods for dasik (traditional pressed sweet), as recorded in 16 old Joseon dynasty (1392-1909) studies. The ingredients used in dasik during the Joseon dynasty were categorized into cereal powders, tree fruits, flower powders, root clods, dry-fish beef powders, and vegetables. In the early, middle, and late eras of the Joseon dynasty, $1^{st}$ set (two, five, and 70 kinds of dasik), $2^{nd}$ set (two, four, and 16 kinds of dasik) were prepared using cereal powders, and during the middle and late eras of the Joseon dynasty one and 22 kinds of dasik were prepared using tree fruits. During the late eras of the Joseon dynasty, seven kinds of dasik were prepared using flower powders, 11 kinds of dasik were prepared using root clods, 12 kinds of dasik were prepared using dry-fish beef powders, and two kinds of dasik were prepared using vegetables. The frequency of the ingredients were in the order of Huek-im (黑荏), Hwang-yul (黃栗), Jin-mal (眞末), Song-wha (松花), and Nok-mal (菉末) during the Joseon dynasty. To prepare dasik, the ingredients were mixed with honey, soy sauce, sesame oil, pepper, and water or ground and shredded to prepare for pressing and for abstract dasik, respectively. The appearance and taste of dasik varied, thereby resulting in nutrient supplementation, as the types of ingredients increased throughout the Joseon dynasty. This observation may be associated with the commercial industrial development that prevailed during the late Joseon dynasty. Further investigation will be conducted on the recipes and ingredients recorded in these old studies to develop a standardized recipe for the globalization of dasik.

A Literature Review on the Type of Joseon Dynasty Jwabans (조선시대 좌반류(佐飯類)의 종류에 대한 문헌적 고찰)

  • Oh, Soon-Duk
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.26 no.3
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    • pp.239-248
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    • 2011
  • This article examines the types of Jwabans as recorded in 21 old books of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1909). The ingredients used in Jwabans during the Joseon dynasty were root vegetables, sea algae, seeds nuts, bird, meat, and fish. In the early, middle, and late eras of the Joseon dynasty, 10, nine, and 181 kinds of Jwabans were prepared, and two, one, and seven kinds of Jwabans were prepared using root vegetables (根菜類). During the early and late eras of the Joseon dynasty, one and 14 kinds of Jwabans were prepared using sea algae (海藻類), respectively, and four kinds of Jwabans were prepared using seeds nuts during late eras of the Joseon dynasty (種實類). During the early, mid and late eras, one, two, and 17 kinds of Jwabans were prepared using bird (鳥類), three, one, and 47 kinds of Jwabans were prepared using meat (肉類), and one, five, and 81 kinds of Jwabans were prepared using fish (魚類). The frequency of the Jwabans ingredients in order were fish (30.5%), meat (23.5%), pheasant (7%), root vegetables (5%), abalone (全鰒) (5%), laver (海苔) (4%), shellfish (貝類) (3%), fish eggs (魚卵) (2.5%), fleshy prawn (大蝦) (2.5%), sea tangle (昆布) (2%), dried tangle (海草) (1.5%), sparrow meat (雀肉) (1.5%), and etc during the Joseon dynasty. It seems that the appearance and supplementation with different ingredients increased throughout the Joseon dynasty. This may be associated with the commercial industrial development that prevailed during the late Joseon dynasty. Further study will be conducted on recipes and ingredients recorded in these old books to develop a standardized recipe to globalize Jwabans.

A Literature Review on the Types of Joseon Dynasty Tteok (Korean Rice Cake) according to its Main Ingredient (주재료에 따른 조선시대 떡류의 문헌적 고찰)

  • Oh, Soon-Duk;Lee, Gui-Chu
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture
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    • v.25 no.1
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    • pp.25-35
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    • 2010
  • This article examines the types of tteok (Korean rice cake) recorded in 21 old literatures of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1909) according to its main ingredients. Tteok varieties of the Joseon dynasty were categorized into jjin-tteok, chin-tteok, jijin-tteok, salmeun-tteok and guun-tteok and their changes in cooking method were discussed from the early to late eras of the Joseon dynasty. These can be summarized as follows. In the early, middle and late eras of the Joseon dynasty, there were 1, 15 and 84 kinds of tteok using non-glutinous rice as the main ingredient, and 6, 24 and 120 kinds using glutinous rice, respectively. Tteok using wheat flour was not found in the early Joseon dynasty, whereas 6 and 32 kinds were found in the middle and late eras, respectively. There were 1, 4 and 5 kinds of tteoks using buckwheat, and 5, 11 and 19 kinds using other ingredients such as yam, barley, elephant's ear, oat, and arrowroot flour, in the early, middle and late eras, respectively. The frequency of the main ingredient increased in the order of glutinous rice>non-glutinous rice>wheat flour>other ingredient>buckwheat flour during the Joseon dynasty and the ratio of tteoks using non-glutinous and glutinous rice flours was 1:1.5. The number and types of tteok were noted to increase abruptly throughout the Joseon dynasty. This may be associated with the commercial industrial development that prevailed in the late Joseon dynasty. Further study will be conducted on their recipes and ingredients recorded in these old literatures to develop a standardized recipe for the globalization of tteok.

A Study on Activities of Doctors in King Sejong Period - Based on The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty - (세종대 의원 활동 연구 - 『조선왕조실록(朝鮮王朝實錄)』을 중심으로 -)

  • Song, Jichung;Eom, Dongmyung
    • Journal of Korean Medical classics
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    • v.29 no.1
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    • pp.55-63
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    • 2016
  • Objectives : Doctors are obviously one of the most interesting subject in medical history. Doctors are who treat patients and disease and the authors for medical records or books. Especially doctors in traditional medicine mostly tried to write medical books for new idea or their esperiences or leave their medical records for treatments, medication, prescription and so on. Therefore, many researchers have explained Korean or Chinese medical history of traditional society through those books or documents rather than doctors themselves. The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty has massive records for history, politics, society, culture, etc. Relating to medical history in traditional Korean medicine, there are ceveral researches about disease of King, disease itself, the methods of treatment and so on, through The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty. However, there are few on activities of many doctors in The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty. Methods : I tried to find out the names who had some roles of medicine in The Annals of King Sejong out of The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty. I could get 35 doctors and browsed 35 doctors in The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty again. Finally, I could have lots of articles from The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty related to 33 doctors(2 dontors had no records about medicine even they were doctors). Results : I categorized 2 ways of those articles; medical activities, non-medical activities. For medical activities, I got subcategories for medical activities; medical maltreatment, treatment for King, royal family, bureaucrat, ambassador. I also got subcategories for non-medical activities; publishing medical books, ambassador as a doctor, medical training, things related to hot spring, food therapist, veterinarian. Conclusions : Medical history of Joseon Dynasty in Korean medical history has somehow been recorded by medical books such as Hyangyakjipseongbang, Euibangyuchwi, Euilimchwalyo, Dongeuibogam, Jejungsinpyeon, Dongeuisusebowon, etc. So I have concerned that there are massive records on doctors activities in The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and tried to focus on their various activities through this research.

A Study on Prescrptions as Napyak of Eonhaenapyakjeongchibang -Based on the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and the Daily Records of Royal Secretariat of Jonseon Dynasty.- (『언해랍약증치방(諺解臘藥症治方)』의 납약에 대한 고찰 -『조선왕조실록(朝鮮王朝實錄)』과 『승정원일기(承政院日記)』를 중심으로-)

  • Yeon, Jihye;Kim, Jungmin;Keum, Gajeong;Jang, Aryeong;Kim, Sangchan;Song, Jichung
    • Herbal Formula Science
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    • v.26 no.2
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    • pp.171-181
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    • 2018
  • Objective : Napyak has known as the herbal medicine, that kings of the Joseon dynasty bestowed on the royal officers around the last day of the each year. There are several researches on Napyak but those are focused the meaning itself, bibliographical studies on Unhaenapyakjeungchibang(which is the text related to Napyak), system in Joseon dynasty related to Napyak and so on. This articles is subject to research the real usage and medical meaning thrugh record of Joseon dynasty Method : Prescriptions of Unhaenapyakjeungchibang were browsed from the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and the Royal Records of Royal Secretariat of the Joseon Dynasty and compared the main disease of prescriptions with the records above. Result : The main disease of prescriptions were corresponded with real usage records of the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and the Royal Records of Royal Secretariat of the Joseon Dynasty except a few cases. And the new meaning of Napyak could be defined as the herbal medicine, that kings of the Joseon dynasty bestowed on the royal officers and all people to cure emergent disease around the last day of the each year. Conclusion : This research is for focusing the real usage of the Napyak thrugh Unhaenapyakjeungchibang prescription but this research is for the medical records of the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and the Royal Records of Royal Secretariat of the Joseon Dynasty. Hereafter, the medical records researches could be conducted by real usage of prescriptions.

A Study of Korean Kim Jeonghui and Qing Dynasty Scholars Academic Exchanges -Focus on Weng Fanggang and Ruan Yuan- (朝鲜秋史与清文人学术交流之小考 -以翁方纲與阮元为中心)

  • Choi, Chang-Won
    • Industry Promotion Research
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.157-164
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    • 2020
  • After the Qing Dynasty overthrow of the Ming dynasty, this is far-reaching influenced on the Ming Dynasty's Sovereign state of the Joseon dynasty. Not only did regulations prohibit the entry into various books published by the Qing Dynasty, In addition, the "Northern Expedition" of Song Siyeo put forward the mainstream political proposal of the Northern Expedition and Qing Dynasty.Even in this context, Representatives of scholars such as Hong Daeyong, Bak Jega, Kim Jeonghui on the Joseon dynasty peninsula at the time, put forward the idea of "Learning from Central Plains" through several visits to Shuntian Prefecture (now Beijing), And gradually formed the well-known Silhak (Practical Learning) ideological of "Bukhak, (Northern Learning)" in the Joseon dynasty history. the Joseon dynasty Silhak ideological scholar of Kim Jeonghui also was under the influence of the Weng Fanggang and Ruan yuan other famous Qing Dynasty Textual scholar, Fruitful achievements in Chinese Classical Studies Epigraphy, Calligraphy.He founded the "Chusa-che" style of calligraphy Chusa, the "Chusa-che" styled is although born out of the clerical script, but more composition and See also asymmetrical in harmony, Strong and vigorous brush strokes, Every word vibrant, Make it a master of gold stone calligraphy in the Joseon Dynasty.This study based on some records of Kim Jeonghui's visited to Shuntian Prefecture(now Beijing), this article examines the academic activities of seeking truth to facts in Korea and the Qing Dynasty at the time, and the impact on these activities on calligraphy and painting in the Joseon Dynasty.