• Title/Summary/Keyword: Invasive alien plant

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An overlooked invasive alien plant of Jejudo Island: Commelina caroliniana (Commelinaceae)

  • KANG, Eun Su;LEE, Kang-Hyup;SON, Dong Chan
    • Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy
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    • v.51 no.1
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    • pp.10-17
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    • 2021
  • Invasive alien species management is pivotal for biodiversity conservation. Commelina caroliniana Walter, from the family Commelinaceae, is an alien plant native to the Himalayas and India, but it has been widely introduced around the world, including in the United States, Brazil, Philippines, and Japan. In Korea, the first population was found growing adjacent to agricultural land and farm roads on Jejudo Island, and field observations confirmed the presence of at least nine populations there. It is similar morphologically to C. diffusa Burm. f. but can be distinguished by involucral bracts that are ciliate at the base, hairs on the peduncle and obsolete upper cincinnus, brown spots on its 4-lobed antherode, and seed surfaces that are smooth to slightly alveolate. It was determined to have an invasiveness low score of 8 according to the Korean 'Invasive Alien Plant Risk Assessment', suggesting that it may spread to natural habitats. Although the current distribution of C. caroliniana is restricted to Jeju-si, it has spread dramatically in many other areas of the world. At present, it has had a limited impact on the local environment, but local and regulatory authorities should pay close attention to this plant and take measures to prevent its expansion in the future.

Distribution Pattern of White Snakeroot as an Invasive Alien Plant and Restoration Strategy to Inhibit Its Expansion in Seoripool Park, Seoul

  • Lee, Han-Sol;Yoo, Hae-Mi;Lee, Chang-Seok
    • Animal cells and systems
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    • v.7 no.3
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    • pp.197-205
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    • 2003
  • White snakeroot (Ageratina altissima (L.) R. King & H. Robinson) as an invasive alien plant appeared more abundantly at lower elevations where frequent artificial interferences prevailed than at higher elevations where such impacts were less. They appeared abundantly in introduced forests such as black locust plantation but they did not appear or were rare in natural forests such as oak forest. But an exceptional phenomenon where white snakeroot did not appear was found in a Korean pine stand with dense cover afforested recently. Appearance status of white snakeroot in each section of trampling path depended on breadth of the path and relative light intensity. Growth of white snakeroot measured as the number of ramet per genet, height, and biomass was better near the trampling path and was reduced toward the forest interior. The growth was proportionate to the relative light intensity measured according to distance from the trampling path. Such results support the fact generally known in relation invasion and expansion of the invasive alien plants. From this viewpoint, we suggest a management plan that applies ecological restoration principles to address ecosystems infected with white snakeroot by restoring the integral feature of the degraded nature and more thoroughly conserving the remaining nature.

Characteristics of Vascular Plants in East Asian Alder (Alnus japonica) Forest Wetland of Heonilleung Royal Tombs

  • Cha, Du-Won;Lee, Seung-Joon;Oh, Choong-Hyeon
    • Proceedings of NIE
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    • v.2 no.3
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    • pp.188-197
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    • 2021
  • This study aimed to obtain fundamental data for demonstrating biodiversity of vegetation of East Asian alder (Alnus japonica) Forest Wetland of Heonilleung Royal Tombs. A total of 166 vascular plants (159 species, three subspecies, three varieties, and one cultivar) belonging to 132 genera and 59 families were found, accounting for 8.3% of 1,996 vascular plant species found in Seoul. Therophyte was the most common life-form of plants in Heonilleung Wetland. As for rare plant species, one Least Concern (LC) species was found. There were 15 floristic regional indicator species in the research area. Three of them belonged to floristic grades III and IV. This indicates that their habitats are discontinuous and isolated to some degree. Nineteen invasive alien plant species were found, most of which were introduced from North America after the year 1964 with a spread rate of V (widespread, WS).

Bowlesia incana Ruiz & Pav. (Apiaceae), a New Invasive Alien Plant in Korea

  • Kang, Eun Su;Kim, Yoon-Young;Nam, Myoung Ja;Kim, Nak Yong;Ji, Seong-Jin;Son, Dong Chan
    • Korean Journal of Plant Resources
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    • v.33 no.3
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    • pp.220-225
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    • 2020
  • Bowlesia incana Ruiz & Pav., a new invasive alien plant in Korea, was found in Ulju-gun, Ulsan Metropolitan City. This species is characterized as being similar to the genera Hydrocotyle Tourn. ex L. and Centella L. However, it differs morphologically from these two genera in leaves, flowers, and fruits, as well as stellate pubescence growing on the whole plant. In Korea, Bowlesia incana Ruiz & Pav. is recorded for the first time in this study. A morphological description, distribution map, and illustrations based on the Korean materials collected are presented.

A New Record for Invasive Alien Plant Ranunculus sardous Crantz (Ranunculaceae) in the Republic of Korea

  • Sun, Eun-Mi;Kim, Hye-Won;Lee, Kang-Hyup;Kim, Hee Soo;So, Dong Chan
    • Korean Journal of Plant Resources
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    • v.32 no.6
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    • pp.752-757
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    • 2019
  • The establishment of invasive alien species management is widely recognized as a pivotal issue in the preservation of biodiversity. Ranunculus sardous Crantz, a species native to Europe, has been widely introduced in many other areas of the world, including the coasts of the United States, Australia, China, India, and Japan. In Korea, the first population of this plant was found growing adjacent to a wetland in Hanon, Seogwipo-si, Jeju Province, on 22 May 2018. Field observations confirmed the presences of at least two populations of this species in Jeju Province, Korea. This species is similar to Ranunculus sceleratus L., but can be readily distinguished by its presence of the trichomes in the whole plant, longer petioles of radical leaves, ovate-shaped leaf segments, globose to subglobose-shaped fruits and flat achenes with narrowly winged and papillae. The Invasive Alien Plant Risk Assessment (IAPRA), a system for recognizing and categorizing alien plants in Korea forests, was used to assess the invasiveness status of the species. Based on this system, R. sardous received a low score of 6, suggesting its potential invasion to natural forests. Although the current distribution of R. sardous is restricted to Jeju Province and thus far has had limited impact on local environments, local and regulatory authorities should pay close attention to this plant and take measures to prevent its further expansion.

Predicting the Suitable Habitat of Invasive Alien Plant Conyza bonariensis based on Climate Change Scenarios (기후변화 시나리오에 의한 외래식물 실망초(Conyza bonariensis)의 서식지 분포 예측)

  • Lee, Yong-Ho;Oh, Young-Ju;Hong, Sun-Hea;Na, Chea-Sun;Na, Young-Eun;Kim, Chang-Suk;Sohn, Soo-In
    • Journal of Climate Change Research
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    • v.6 no.3
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    • pp.243-248
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    • 2015
  • This study was conducted to predict the changes of potential distribution for invasive alien plant, Conyza bonariensis in Korea. C. bonariensis was found in southern Korea (Jeju, south coast, southwest coast). The habitats of C. bonariensis were roadside, bare ground, farm area, and pasture, where the interference by human was severe. Due to the seed characteristics of Compositae, C. bonariensis take long scattering distance and it will easily spread by movement of wind, vehicles and people. C. canadensis in same Conyza genus has already spread on a national scale and it is difficult to manage. We used maximum entropy modeling (MaxEnt) for analyzing the environmental influences on C. bonariensis distribution and projecting on two different RCP scenarios, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5. The results of our study indicated annual mean temperature, elevation and temperature seasonality had higher contribution for C. bonariensis potential distribution. Area under curve (AUC) values of the model was 0.9. Under future climate scenario, the constructed model predicted that potential distribution of C. bonariensis will be increased by 338% on RCP 4.5 and 769% on RCP 8.5 in 2100s.

Vascular Plants of Major Wetlands in Gyeongju National Park - Focused on Tohamsan wetland, Amgok wetland and Namsan wetland - (경주국립공원 내 주요습지의 관속식물상 - 토함산습지, 암곡습지, 남산습지를 중심으로 -)

  • You, Ju-Han;Kwon, Soon-Young
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.21 no.1
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    • pp.41-54
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    • 2018
  • The purpose of this study was to present the fundamental data for conservation and management of wetland ecosystem by surveying and analysing the vascular plants distributed in major wetlands, Gyeongju National Park. The study sites were Tohamsan wetland, Amgok wetland and Namsan wetland. The numbers of vascular plants were summarized as 200 taxa including 70 families, 145 genera, 171 species, 2 subspecies, 23 varieties and 4 forms. The threatened species designated by Ministry of Environment was Utricularia yakusimensis, and the rare plants were 7 taxa including Utricularia yakusimensis, Drosera rotundifolia, Mosla japonica, Utricularia bifida, Pogonia japonica, Utricularia racemosa and Iris ensata var. spontanea. The Korean endemic plants were Lespedeza maritima and Weigela subsessilis. The specific plants by floristic region were 12 taxa including 3 taxa of grade V, 1 taxa of grade IV, 1 taxa of grade III, 2 taxa of grade II and 5 taxa of grade I. The plants with approval for delivering oversea were 9 taxa including Glycine soja, Saussurea pulchella, Habenaria linearifolia and so forth. The naturalized platns were 5 taxa including Rumex obtusifolius, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Bidens frondosa, Erigeron annuus and Erigeron strigosus, the invasive alien plant was Ambrosia artemisiifolia.

Environmental Factors Affecting Establishment and Expansion of the Invasive Alien Species of Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) in Seoripool Park, Seoul

  • Lee, Han-Wool;Lee, Chang-Seok
    • Animal cells and systems
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.27-40
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    • 2006
  • Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima Swingle) as an invasive alien plant, appeared usually in the disturbed locations such as road-side, incised slope, and trampling path-side. They appeared abundantly in the trampling pathside but they did not appear or were rare in the interior of forest. Density and importance value of tree of heaven were proportionate to the relative light intensity measured according to distance from the trampling path toward forest interior and closely related to the breadth of trampling path as well. They were associated with annual, other exotic species or ruderal plants well. Distributional pattern of mature trees of them in the study area and its surrounding environments implied that they were introduced intentionally. Size class distribution of them showed that they are in expansion and artificial interferences such as, installing physical training space and developing hiking course functioned as trigger factors in their invasion and expansion. The results support the facts known generally in relation to invasion and expansion of the invasive alien plants. In this viewpoint, we suggest a management plan that applies ecological restoration principles to address ecosystems infected with tree of heaven by restoring the integral feature of the degraded nature and conserving the remained nature more thoroughly.

Vascular Plants Distributed in Daesong Tidal Flat Wetland, Ahnsan-si, Gyeonggi-do (경기도 안산시 대송갯벌 습지에 분포하는 관속식물상)

  • Oh, Hyun-Kyung;Kim, Se-Chon;You, Ju-Han
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.31-48
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    • 2014
  • This study is carried out to offer the raw data for conservation and management of tidal flat ecosystem by surveying and analysing the flora distributed in Daesong tidal flat wetland, Ahnsan-si, Gyeonggi-do coast, Korea. The results of surveying the flora were recorded as 186 taxa including 45 families, 121 genera, 170 species, 14 varieties and 2 forms. The halophytes checked around this site were 20 taxa including Atriplex gmelinii, Salicornia europaea, Suaeda glauca, Suaeda japonica, Phragmites communis, Carex scabrifolia and so forth. Polygonum bellardii that species had ecological value was the specific plant by floristic region. The growth locations of halophytes were 11 taxa of upper, 4 taxa of high tide line and 5 taxa of lower. The naturalized plants were 42 taxa including Phytolacca americana, Chenopodium glaucum, Melilotus alba, Veronica persica, Bidens pilosa, Leptochloa fusca and so forth. Because Aster subulatusand Leptochloa fusca grew a upper tidal flat wetland, they had the characteristics of halophytes. The focuses on the management of Daesong wetland were halophytes and naturalized plants. Firstly, to maintain a halophytes communities, we will sow the halophytes seeds and plant the individuals. And In-Situ conservation was applied to Polygonum bellardii habitat. Secondly, to prevent the genesis of naturalized plant, we will don't disturb around the wetland environment. The invasive alien plant, Lactuca scariola, was removed by periodic monitoring and purification activity.

Forest regrowth reduces richness and abundance of invasive alien plant species in community managed Shorea robusta forests of central Nepal

  • Khaniya, Laxmi;Shrestha, Bharat Babu
    • Journal of Ecology and Environment
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    • v.44 no.2
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    • pp.90-97
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    • 2020
  • Background: Natural forests are generally considered to be less prone to biological invasions than other modified ecosystems, particularly when canopy cover is high. Few decades of management of degraded forests by local communities in Nepal has increased canopy cover and altered disturbance regimes. These changes might have reduced the abundance of invasive alien plant species (IAPS) in forests. To understand the status of IAPS in such forests, we studied two community managed Shorea robusta forests (Sundari and Dhusheri) of Nawalpur district in central Nepal. In these two forests, vegetation sampling was done using circular plots 10 m radius at forest edge, gaps, and within canopy. Variation of IAPS richness and cover across these microhabitats were compared, and their variation with tree canopy cover and basal area analyzed. Result: Altogether 14 IAPS were recorded in the study forests; among them Chromolaena odorata, Ageratum houstonianum, and Lantana camara had the highest frequency. Mikania micrantha was at the early stage of colonization in Sundari Community Forest (CF) but absent in Dhuseri CF. Both IAPS cover and richness was higher at forest edge and gap than in canopy plots and both these attributes declined with increasing canopy cover and tree basal area. Conclusion: The results indicate that increase in canopy cover and closure of forest gaps through participatory management of degraded forests can prevent plant invasions and suppress the growth of previously established IAPS in Shorea robusta forests of Nepal. This is the unacknowledged benefit of participatory forest management in Nepal.