• Title, Summary, Keyword: Hypernodulation

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Genetic Mapping of Hypernodulation in Soybean Mutant SS2-2

  • Lee, Suk-Ha;Ha, Bo-Keun
    • KOREAN JOURNAL OF CROP SCIENCE
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    • v.46 no.5
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    • pp.416-419
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    • 2001
  • Hypernodulation soybean mutant, SS2-2, is characterized with greater nodulation and nitrogen fixing ability in the root nodule than its wild type, Shinpaldalkong 2. The present study was performed to identify a genetic locus conferring hypernodulation in soybean mutant SS2-2 and to determine whether the gene controlling the hypernodulation of SS2-2 is allelic to that controlling the supernodulation of nts382 mutant. Hybridization studies between SS2-2 and Taekwangkong revealed that the recessive gene was responsible for the hypernodulation character in soybean mutant SS2-2. Allelism was also tested by crossing supernodulating mutant nts382 and hypernodulating mutant SS2-2 that both hypernodulation and supernodulation genes were likely controlled by an identical locus. Molecular marker mapping of hypernodulation gene in SS2-2 using SSR markers confirmed that the gene conferring hypernodulation was located at the same loci with the gene conferring supernodulation. It is interesting to note that the same gene controlled the super- and hyper-nodulation characters, although SS2-2 and nts 382 exhibited differences in the amount of nodulation in the root system. Further genetic studies should be needed to clarify the genetic regulation of super- and hyper-nodulation in soybean.

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Long-Distance Control of Nodulation: Molecules and Models

  • Magori, Shimpei;Kawaguchi, Masayoshi
    • Molecules and Cells
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    • v.27 no.2
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    • pp.129-134
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    • 2009
  • Legume plants develop root nodules to recruit nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia. This symbiotic relationship allows the host plants to grow even under nitrogen limiting environment. Since nodule development is an energetically expensive process, the number of nodules should be tightly controlled by the host plants. For this purpose, legume plants utilize a long-distance signaling known as autoregulation of nodulation (AON). AON signaling in legumes has been extensively studied over decades but the underlying molecular mechanism had been largely unclear until recently. With the advent of the model legumes, L. japonicus and M. truncatula, we have been seeing a great progress including isolation of the AON-associated receptor kinase. Here, we summarize recent studies on AON and discuss an updated view of the long-distance control of nodulation.

Growth, Nitrogen Metabolism, and Nodulation of Hypernodulating Soybean Mutant Affected by Soil Fertility

  • Ha, Bo-Keun;Lee, Suk-Ha
    • KOREAN JOURNAL OF CROP SCIENCE
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    • v.46 no.2
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    • pp.145-149
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    • 2001
  • This study was performed to evaluate the growth and nodulation characters of hypernodulating soy-bean mutant, SS2-2, and to know the growth and yield performance of the mutant in infertile soil. Soil fertility was adjusted by mixing the different ratios of soil components including clay, river sand, and horticultural bed, which resulted in fertile and infertile soil. Dry weight, nitrogen concentration, and leaf nitrate reductase of each plant were measured around V6 stage (47 days after planting) and around R3 stage (82 days after planting). There were significant effects of soil fertility and soybean genotype on the total dry weights including root, nodule, stem, leaf, and pod dry weight at V6 and R3 stages. Total dry weight of hypernodulating mutant, SS2-2, was clearly less than that of its wild type, Sinpaldalkong 2. However, nodule development on the roots of SS2-2 was much greater than that of Sinpaldalkong 2, regardless of soil fertility. Though SS2-2 was smaller in plant size than Sinpaldalkong 2, genotypic difference in total nitrogen content was not significant at both V6 and R3 stages because SS2-2 fixed more nitrogen biologically than its wild type in the root nodule. The SS2-2 mutant showed lower plant yield in both infertile and fertile soil. The SS2-2 contained more crude seed protein than Sinpaldalkong 2, and was characterized with reduced top and root growth.

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Molecular Characterization of Hypernodulation in Soybean

  • Van, Kyu-Jung;Ha, Bo-Keun;Hwang, Eun-Young;Kim, Moon-Young;Heu, Sung-Gi;Lee, Suk-Ha
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.19 no.1
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    • pp.24-29
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    • 2003
  • SS2-2, a hypernodulating soybean mutant was isolated by EMS mutagenesis from Sinpaldalkong 2. This auto-regulation mutant showed greater number of nodules and smaller plant size than its wild type Sinpaldalkong 2. SSR markers were used to identify DNA variation at SSR loci from different soybean LG. The only SSR marker that detected a length polymorphism between SS2-2 and its wild type ancestor was Satt294 on LG C1 instead of LG H, locating a hypernodulating gene. Sequencing data of flanking Satt294 indicated that the size variation was due to extra stretch of TTA repeats of the SSR motif in SS2-2, along with $A\longrightarrow$G transversion. In spite of phenotypic differences between the wild type and its hypernodulating mutants, genomic DNA poly-morphisms at microsatellite loci could not control regulation of nodule formation. The cDNA-AFLP method was applied to compare differential display of cDNA between Sinpaldalkong 2 and SS2-2. After isolation and sequence comparison with many AELP fragments, several interesting genes were identified. Northern blot analysis, immunolocalization and/or the yeast two-hybrid system with these genes might provide information on regulation of nodule development in SS2-2.

Construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library Containing Large BamHI Genomic Fragments from Medicago truncatula and Identification of Clones Linked to Hypernodulating Genes

  • Park So-Yeon;Nam Young-Woo
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.256-263
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    • 2006
  • In the model legume Medicago truncatula, two mutants, sickle and sunn, exhibit morphologically and genetically distinct hypernodulation phenotypes. However, efforts to isolate the single recessive and single semidominant genes for sickle and sunn, respectively, by map-based cloning have so far been unsuccessful, partly due to the absence of clones that enable walks from linked marker positions. To help resolve these difficulties, a new bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed using BamHI-digested genomic fragments. A total of 23,808 clones were collected from ligation mixtures prepared with double-size-selected high-molecular-weight DNA. The average insert size was 116 kb based on an analysis of 88 randomly selected clones using NotI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. About 18.5% of the library clones lacked inserts. The frequency of the BAC clones carrying chloroplast or mitochondrial DNA was 0.98% and 0.03%, respectively. The library represented approximately 4.9 haploid M. truncatula genomes. Hybridization of the BAC clone filters with a $C_{0}t-l$ DNA probe revealed that approximately 37% of the clones likely carried repetitive sequence-enriched DNA. An ordered array of pooled BAC DNA was screened by polymerase chain reactions using 13 sequence-characterized molecular markers that belonged to the eight linkage groups. Except for two markers, one to five positive BAC clones were obtained per marker. Accordingly, the sickle- and sunn-linked BAC clones identified herein will be useful for the isolation of these biotechnologically important genes. The new library will also provide clones that fill the gaps between preexisting BAC contigs, facilitating the physical mapping and genome sequencing of M. truncatula.