• Title, Summary, Keyword: HUVECs

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Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Induction of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Apogossypolone

  • Zhan, Yong-Hua;Huang, Xiao-Feng;Hu, Xing-Bin;An, Qun-Xing;Liu, Zhi-Xin;Zhang, Xian-Qing
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.1791-1795
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    • 2013
  • Aims and Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in the male reproductive system, which causes the second most cancer deaths of males, and control of angiogenesis in prostate lesions is of obvious importance. This study assessed the effect of apogossypolone (ApoG2) on proliferation and apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subjects and Methods: HUVECs were treated with different concentrations of ApoG2. The survival rate of HUVECs were determined by MTT assay. Utrastructural changes of HUVECs were assessed with transmission electron microscopy. Apoptosis in HUVECs was analyzed by flow cytometry and cell migration by Boyden chamber assay. Matrigel assays were used to quantify the development of tube-like networks. Results: ApoG2 significantly inhibited HUVEC growth even at 24 h (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of ApoG2 is more obvious as the concentration and the culture time increased (P<0.05). These results indicate that ApoG2 inhibits the proliferation of HUVECs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with increase of the apoptosis rate. Besides, ApoG2 reduced the formation of total pseudotubule length and network branches of HUVECs. Conclusions: The results suggest that ApoG2 inhibits angiogenesis of HUVECs by growth inhibition and apoptosis induction.

Hesperetin Inhibits Vascular Formation by Suppressing of the PI3K/AKT, ERK, and p38 MAPK Signaling Pathways

  • Kim, Gi Dae
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.299-306
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    • 2014
  • Hesperetin has been shown to possess a potential anti-angiogenic effect, including vascular formation by endothelial cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the potential anti-angiogenic activity of hesperetin are not fully understood. In the present study, we evaluated whether hesperetin has anti-angiogenic effects in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were treated with 50 ng/mL vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to induce proliferation as well as vascular formation, followed by treatment with several doses of hesperetin (25, 50, and $100{\mu}M$) for 24 h. Cell proliferation and vascular formation were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and tube formation assay, respectively. In addition, cell signaling related to cell proliferation and vascular formation was analyzed by western blot. Furthermore, a mouse aorta ring assay was performed to confirm the effect of hesperetin on vascular formation. Hesperetin treatment did not cause differences in HUVECs proliferation. However, hesperetin significantly inhibited VEGF-induced cell migration and tube formation of HUVECs (P<0.05). Moreover, hesperetin suppressed the expression of ERK, p38 MAPK, and PI3K/AKT in the VEGF-induced HUVECs. In an ex vivo model, hesperetin also suppressed microvessel sprouting of mouse aortic rings. Taken together, the findings suggest that hesperetin inhibited vascular formation by endothelial cells via the inhibition of the PI3K/AKT, ERK and p38 MAPK signaling.

In Vivo Angiogenic Capacity of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth with Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

  • Kim, Ji-Hye;Kim, Gee-Hye;Kim, Jae-Won;Pyeon, Hee Jang;Lee, Jae Cheoun;Lee, Gene;Nam, Hyun
    • Molecules and Cells
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    • v.39 no.11
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    • pp.790-796
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    • 2016
  • Dental pulp is a highly vascularized tissue requiring adequate blood supply for successful regeneration. In this study, we investigated the functional role of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) as a perivascular source for in vivo formation of vessel-like structures. Primarily isolated SHEDs showed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics including the expression of surface antigens and in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials. Moreover, SHEDs were positive for NG2, ${\alpha}$-smooth muscle actin (SMA), platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta ($PDGFR{\beta}$), and CD146 as pericyte markers. To prove feasibility of SHEDs as perivascular source, SHEDs were transplanted into immunodeficient mouse using Matrigel with or without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transplantation of SHEDs alone or HUVECs alone resulted in no formation of vessel-like structures with enough red blood cells. However, when SHEDs and HUVECs were transplanted together, extensive vessel-like structures were formed. The presence of murine erythrocytes within lumens suggested the formation of anastomoses between newly formed vessel-like structures in Matrigel plug and the host circulatory system. To understand underlying mechanisms of in vivo angiogenesis, the expression of angiogenic cytokine and chemokine, their receptors, and MMPs was compared between SHEDs and HUVECs. SHEDs showed higher expression of1VEGF, SDF-$1{\alpha}$, and $PDGFR{\beta}$ than HUVECs. On the contrary, HUVECs showed higher expression of VEGF receptors, CXCR4, and PDGF-BB than SHEDs. This differential expression pattern suggested reciprocal interactions between SHEDs and HUVECs and their involvement during in vivo angiogenesis. In conclusion, SHEDs could be a feasible source of perivascular cells for in vivo angiogenesis.

Study on the Anti-angiogenic Activity of Ethanol Extract of Bojungbangam-tang (보정방암탕 에타놀층의 혈관형성 저해작용에 관한 연구)

  • Lee Eun-Ok;Shim Beom-Sang;Surh Young-Joon;Jeon Byung-Hun;Ahn Kyoo-Seok;Kim Sung-Hoon
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.20 no.1
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    • pp.15-19
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    • 2006
  • The anti-angiogenic activity of ethanol extract of Bojungbangam-tang, a new herbal prescription composed of nine crude drugs, was evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HPLC profile revealed that five major compunds such as apioliquiritin, narirutin, hesperidin, liquiritin and glycyrrhizin. Ethanol extract of Bojungbangam-tang (EBJT) did not showed any significant cytotoxicity against HUVECs up to 200 ug/ml. EBJT significantly inhibited basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced HUVECs proliferation to 69% at 200 ${\mu}g/ml$. Migration using window scraping method and tube formation in bFGF stimulated HUVECs were also significantly suppressed by EBJT in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that Bojungbangam-tang can be a potent prescription for angiogenesis related disease.

Protective Effects of Fermented Soymilk Extract on High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

  • Yi, Na-Ri;Park, Min-Jung;Han, Ji-Sook
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.7-13
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    • 2010
  • We investigated whether the fermented soymilk extract (FSE) has protective effects against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). FSE was prepared via fermentation of soymilk with Bacillus subtilis followed by methanol extraction. To determine the protective effect of FSE, oxidative stress was induced by exposing of HUVECs to the high glucose (30 mM) for 48 hr. Exposure of HUVECs to high glucose for 48 hr resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell viability, catalase, SOD and GSH-px activity and a significant (p<0.05) increase in intracellular ROS level and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation in comparison to the cells treated with 5.5 mM glucose. However, at concentration of 0.1 mg/mL, FSE treatment decreased intracellular ROS level and TBARS formation, and increased cell viability and activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase, SOD and GSH-px in high glucose pretreated HUVEC. These results suggest that FSE may be able to protect HUVECs from high glucose-induced oxidative stress, partially through the antioxidative defense systems.

Effect of Baechu Kimchi Added Ecklonia cava Extracts on High Glucose-induced Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

  • Lee, Hyun-Ah;Song, Yeong-Ok;Jang, Mi-Soon;Han, Ji-Sook
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.170-177
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    • 2014
  • Endothelial cell dysfunction is considered to be a major cause of vascular complications in diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of a baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava extract (BKE) against high glucose induced oxidative damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment with a high concentration of glucose (30 mM) induced cytotoxicity, whereas treatment with BKE protected HUVECs from high glucose induced damage; by restoring cell viability. In addition, BKE reduced lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with high glucose concentrations also induced the overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and NF-${\kappa}B$ proteins in HUVECs, but BKE treatment significantly reduced the overexpression of these proteins. These findings indicate that BKE may be a valuable treatment against high glucose-induced oxidative stress HUVECs.

Hesperidin Inhibits Vascular Formation by Blocking the AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathways

  • Kim, Gi Dae
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.20 no.4
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    • pp.221-229
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    • 2015
  • Hesperidin has been shown to possess a potential inhibitory effect on vascular formation in endothelial cells. However, the fundamental mechanism for the anti-angiogenic activity of hesperidin is not fully understood. In the present study, we evaluated whether hesperidin has anti-angiogenic effects in mouse embryonic stem cell (mES)-derived endothelial-like cells, and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), and evaluated their mechanism via the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The endothelial cells were treated with several doses of hesperidin (12.5, 25, 50, and $100{\mu}M$) for 24 h. Cell viability and vascular formation were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and tube formation assay, respectively. Alteration of the AKT/mTOR signaling in vascular formation was analyzed by western blot. In addition, a mouse aortic ring assay was used to determine the effect of hesperidin on vascular formation. There were no differences between the viability of mES-derived endothelial-like cells and HUVECs after hesperidin treatment. However, hesperidin significantly inhibited cell migration and tube formation of HUVECs (P<0.05) and suppressed sprouting of microvessels in the mouse aortic ring assay. Moreover, hesperidin suppressed the expression of AKT and mTOR in HUVECs. Taken together, these findings suggest that hesperidin inhibits vascular formation by blocking the AKT/mTOR signaling pathways.

Effect of Polyopes lancifolia Extract on Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Induced by High Glucose

  • Min, Seong Won;Han, Ji Sook
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.18 no.1
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    • pp.38-44
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    • 2013
  • The protective effect of Polyopes lancifolia extract on high glucose-induced oxidative stress was investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). High concentration of glucose (30 mM) treatment induced HUVECs cell death, but Polyopes lancifolia extract, at concentrations of 25, 50, and $100{\mu}g/mL$, protected cells from high glucose-induced damage. Furthermore, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, intracellular reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide levels increased by high glucose treatment were effectively decreased by treatment with Polyopes lancifolia extract in a dose-dependent manner. Also, Polyopes lancifolia extract treatment reduced the overexpressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and nuclear factor-kappa B proteins activation that was induced by high glucose in HUVECs. These results indicate that Polyopes lancifolia extract is a potential therapeutic material that will reduce the damage caused by high glucose-induced-oxidative stress associated with diabetes.

Protective Effects of the BuOH Fraction from Laminaria japonica Extract on High Glucose-induced Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

  • Park, Min-Jung;Song, Young-Sun;Han, Ji-Sook
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.94-99
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    • 2006
  • This study investigated the protective effect of the butanol (BuOH) fraction from Laminaria japonica (BFLJ) extract on high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Freeze-dried L japonica was extracted with distilled water, and the extracted solution was mixed with ethanol then centrifuged. The supernatant was subjected to sequential fractionation with various solvents. The BuOH fraction was used in this study because it possessed the strongest antioxidant activity among the various solvent fractions. To determine the protective effect of the BFLJ, oxidative stress was induced by exposing of HUVECs to the high glucose (30 mM) or normal glucose (5.5 mM) for 48 hr. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) concentration, and antioxidant enzyme activities such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px), and glutathion reductase (GSH-re) were measured. Exposure of HUVECs to high glucose for 48 hr resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell viability, SOD, GSH-px and GSH-re and a significant (p<0.05) increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation in comparison to the cells treated with 5.5 mM glucose or untreated with glucose. BFLJ treatment decreased TBARS formation and increased cell viability, GSH concentration, and activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase, SOD, GSH-px, and GSH-re in high glucose pretreated HUVECs. These results suggest that BFLJ may be able to protect HUVECs from high glucose-induced oxidative stress, partially through the antioxidative defence systems.

Effects of gintonin on the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical-vein endothelial cells: involvement of lysophosphatidic-acid receptors and vascular-endothelial-growth-factor signaling

  • Hwang, Sung-Hee;Lee, Byung-Hwan;Choi, Sun-Hye;Kim, Hyeon-Joong;Won, Kyung Jong;Lee, Hwan Myung;Rhim, Hyewon;Kim, Hyoung-Chun;Nah, Seung-Yeol
    • Journal of Ginseng Research
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    • v.40 no.4
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    • pp.325-333
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    • 2016
  • Background: Ginseng extracts are known to have angiogenic effects. However, to date, only limited information is available on the molecular mechanism underlying the angiogenic effects and the main components of ginseng that exert these effects. Human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are used as an in vitro model for screening therapeutic agents that promote angiogenesis and wound healing. We recently isolated gintonin, a novel ginseng-derived lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand, from ginseng. LPA plays a key role in angiogenesis and wound healing. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the in vitro effects of gintonin on proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs, which express endogenous LPA1/3 receptors. Results: Gintonin stimulated proliferation and migration of HUVECs. The LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, Ki16425, short interfering RNA against LPA1 or LPA3 receptor, and the Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, significantly decreased the gintonin-induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs, which indicates the involvement of LPA receptors and Rho kinase activation. Further, gintonin increased the release of vascular endothelial growth factors from HUVECs. The cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor NS-398, nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor BAY11-7085, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 blocked the gintonin-induced migration, which shows the involvement of cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor kappa B, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling. Conclusion: The gintonin-mediated proliferation, migration, and vascular-endothelial-growth-factor release in HUVECs via LPA-receptor activation may be one of in vitro mechanisms underlying ginsenginduced angiogenic and wound-healing effects.