• Title, Summary, Keyword: HPV vaccine

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Comparison of Factors Associated with Intention to Receive Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Between Male and Female Undergraduate Students (남녀 대학생의 인유두종 바이러스 백신접종의도 영향요인 비교)

  • Kim, Hae-Won
    • Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing
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    • v.17 no.4
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    • pp.415-425
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    • 2011
  • Purpose: This study was done to identify and compare factors associated with intention to receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine between male and female undergraduate students. Methods: In the fall of 2010, 479 students responded to self-administered questionnaires about their intention to receive HPV vaccine, HPV knowledges, HPV related involvements and optimistic bias, subject's characteristics including opinion about HPV vaccine. Mann-Whitney U test, uni-variate and multi-variate logistic regression were used for data analysis with SPSS/WIN. Results: Intention to receive vaccine were 22.0% of men and 25.0% of women. There were significantly different in HPV knowledge (Z=-2.74, p=.006), optimistic bias (Z=-4.60, p<.001), vaccine is necessary for women (Z=-4,30, p<.001), vaccine is necessary for men (Z=-4.37, p<.001), vaccine is necessary if only symptom exist (Z=-4.52, p<.001), but there were not different in intention to receive vaccine, involvement between men and women. Concern about vaccine safety (OR=3.19, 95% CI 1.63~6.23) was determinant of intention to receive HPV vaccine for men. Conclusion: This study showed gender differences in HPV knowledge, HPV related optimistic bias and opinion about HPV vaccine, which would be assessed and well managed in tailored HPV education for enhancing HPV vaccine acceptance.

National HPV Immunisation Programme: Knowledge and Acceptance of Mothers Attending an Obstetrics Clinic at a Teaching Hospital, Kuala Lumpur

  • Ezat, Sharifa Wan Puteh;Hod, Rozita;Mustafa, Jamsiah;Mohd Dali, Ahmad Zailani Hatta;Sulaiman, Aqmar Suraya;Azman, Azlin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.2991-2999
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    • 2013
  • Background: Introduction of the HPV vaccine is a forefront primary prevention method in reducing the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. The Malaysia government has implemented the National HPV immunisation programme since 2010, supplying HPV vaccine free to targeted 13 year olds. This study aimed to explore the level of knowledge among mothers on cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccine and National HPV (NHPV) immunisation programme since its' implementation. It also assessed acceptance of mothers towards HPV vaccine being administered to their daughter, son or themselves. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 155 respondents using self-administered questionnaires; conducted in December 2012 at the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic in a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur. Respondents were selected using a multistage sampling technique. Results: A response rate of 100% was obtained. Overall, 51.0% of mothers had good knowledge, with 55% having good knowledge of cervical cancer, 54.2% for both HPV and the National HPV immunisation programme and 51.0% for the HPV vaccine. Regression analyses showed that ethnicity was associated with knowledge on cervical cancer (p=0.003) while education was associated with knowledge on HPV (p=0.049). Three factors are associated with knowledge of the National HPV immunisation programme; ethnicity (p=0.017), mothers' education (p=0.0005) and number of children (p=0.020). The acceptance of HPV vaccine to be administered among daughter was the highest at 87.1%, followed by for mothers themselves at 73.5%, and the least is for sons 62.6%. Conclusions: This study found that the overall level of knowledge was moderate. Adequate information on cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccination and the National HPV immunisation programme should be provided to mothers in order to increase acceptance of the HPV vaccine which can reduce the disease burden in the future.

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

  • Lee, Yu-Jeung
    • Biomolecules & Therapeutics
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    • v.15 no.3
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    • pp.133-136
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    • 2007
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. An estimated 6.2 million people are infected with HPV every year. Randomized controlled studies consistently show that HPV vaccine is effective in preventing infection and HPV related cervical lesions. In June 2006, Gardasil (qadrivalent HPV recombinant vaccine) was approved by the FDA for use in females 9-26 years of age. This article reviews published data to evaluate the effectiveness of HPV vaccine for the prevention of cervical cancer.

Practice of HPV Vaccine and Associated Factors among School Girls in Melaka, Malaysia

  • Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed;Bobryshev, Yuri V.;Al-Jashamy, Karim;Al-Musli, Mahfoudh
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.8
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    • pp.3835-3840
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    • 2012
  • Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the practice and associated factors of HPV vaccine among school girls in Melaka, Malaysia. Methodology: A total number of 612 secondary school girls participated in this study. The questionnaire consists of 38 questions which included 3 sections. The first section is about socio-demography. The Second section is about knowledge and awareness of HPV vaccines. The third section is about practices with associated barriers of HPV vaccination. Verbal consent was obtained from all participants, and data were analyzed using SPSS 13. Results: A total number of 612 secondary school girl students participated in this study. The mean age was $13.93{\pm}SD$ (1.09); minimum age was 13 years old and maximum was 17 years old. The majority of them was Malay, from rural areas and had a family monthly income of RM 3000 or less (91.8%, 53.1%, 69.6%; respectively). The majority of the parents of the school girls were with secondary education level (56.4%). The majority of the participants did not have a family history of cervical cancer (99.0%). The prevalence of HPV vaccination was 77.9% among school girls in Melaka. The majority of the participants were vaccinated in their schools (77.0%). About 69% knew about cervical cancer and 77.6% had ever heard about HPV vaccine. Regarding the factors that influence the practice of uptake HPV vaccine, they were age, race, income, parents' education, knowledge about cervical cancer, heard about HPV vaccine and place of getting the vaccine (p<0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of HPV vaccine among school girls is high. Age, race, income, parents' education, knowledge about cervical cancer, heard about HPV vaccine and place of getting the vaccine were the significant factors that influence the practice of uptake HPV vaccine among school girls.

Knowledge of Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccine Post-Vaccination among Mothers and Daughters in Vietnam

  • Paul, Proma;LaMontagne, D. Scott;Le, Nga Thi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.6
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    • pp.2587-2592
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    • 2012
  • Background: Limited human papillomavirus (HPV) related knowledge might be a barrier to future vaccine acceptance. From 2008-2010, PATH conducted an HPV vaccination demonstration project in partnership with the government immunization program in Vietnam, which included awareness campaigns prior to vaccination. Objective: To assess and compare knowledge and attitudes about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines between mothers and daughters, and whether knowledge was associated with vaccination status. Methods: We analyzed HPV-related knowledge and attitude data from mother-daughter paired responses to a cross-sectional household survey. After parents completed the survey, daughters were asked the same questions. We calculated the frequency of responses for each question and devised a scaled composite measure for knowledge. Results: Participants believed they had received enough information about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines and it was sufficient to make a decision about vaccination. Fifty percent of the participants knew HPV causes cervical cancer and 80% knew the HPV vaccine prevented cervical cancer. Mothers had more knowledge about cervical cancer and HPV infection (p<0.01), compared to daughters, who had more vaccine specific knowledge (p<0.01). However, the total mean knowledge score was similar for the groups. Girls not fully vaccinated had a lower mean knowledge score than fully vaccinated girls (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that the purpose of the HPV vaccine was clearly messaged; however, some misconceptions about cervical cancer and HPV still exist. Limited knowledge about the magnitude of cervical cancer, HPV as a cause of cervical cancer, and HPV vaccines may have contributed to incomplete vaccination.

Analysis of News Articles Regarding Safety Issue of HPV Vaccine (자궁경부암 백신 안전성 관련 언론보도 분석)

  • Lee, Mina;Hong, Juhyun
    • Journal of Internet Computing and Services
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.77-88
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    • 2018
  • In order to prevent cervical cancer, free vaccination against cervical cancer(HPV vaccine) for 12-year-old girls has been ongoing since June 2016. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the media reported the risk information of HPV vaccine side effects and to suggest implications for government's risk communication and policy PR. The time frame was divided into two stages, stage 1(policy formation stage, 6 months before the start of free HPV vaccination) and stage 2(policy execution stage, 6 months after the free HPV vaccination was implemented). A total of 314 news articles on HPV vaccine safety and HPV Vaccine side effects were analyzed by content analysis and network analysis. The number of articles increased at stage 2 and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emphasized the safety of HPV vaccine and encouraged the inoculation while highlighting the effectiveness of the vaccine. Regarding HPV vaccine side effects, cases against vaccination in Japan were mainly reported at stage 1, whereas cases of HPV vaccine side effects from other countries such as Europe and USA were frequently reported at stage 2. In order to increase vaccination rate of HPV vaccine, it is time to take a strategic approach to prevent vague fear or anxiety about the vaccine.

HPV Vaccine Knowledge and Perceived Risk of Cervical Cancer among Female College Students in Taiwan

  • Wang, Hsiu-Ho;Wu, Shiao-Ying
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.12
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    • pp.7371-7374
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    • 2013
  • Aims: The study targeted the HPV vaccine knowledge and perceived risk of cervical cancer among female college students in Taiwan as well as the relationship between knowledge of the HPV vaccine and perceived risk of cervical cancer. Materials and Method: The results of this study on female college students are described using descriptive and correlation designs. A convenience sampling approach was employed with a self-filling structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 150 students completed the questionnaire. Values were 7.49 for the mean HPV vaccine knowledge scale and 18.0 for their mean perceived risk of cervical cancer scale. HPV vaccine knowledge was positively correlated with perceived risk of cervical cancer. Conclusions: The findings of this study can serve as a reference for future HPV prevention in Taiwan.

Knowledge and Awareness of Human Papillomavirus (HPV), Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccine among Women in Two Distinct Nepali Communities

  • Johnson, Derek Christopher;Bhatta, Madhav Prasad;Gurung, Santosh;Aryal, Shilu;Lhaki, Pema;Shrestha, Sadeep
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.19
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    • pp.8287-8293
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    • 2014
  • Background: This study assessed human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine knowledge and awareness among women in two sub-populations in Nepal - Khokana, a traditional Newari village in the Lalitpur District about eight kilometers south of Kathmandu, and Sanphebagar, a village development committee within Achham District in rural Far-Western Nepal. Methods: Study participants were recruited during health camps conducted by Nepal Fertility Care Center, a Nepali non-governmental organization. Experienced staff administered a Nepali language survey instrument that included questions on socio-demographics, reproductive health and knowledge on HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine. Results: Of the 749 participants, 387 (51.7%) were from Khokana and 362 (48.3%) were from Sanphebagar. Overall, 53.3% (n=372) of women were aware of cervical cancer with a significant difference between Khokana and Sanphebagar (63.3% vs 43.0%; p=0.001). Overall, 15.4% (n=107) of women had heard of HPV and 32% (n=34) of these women reported having heard of the HPV vaccine. If freely available, 77.5% of the women reported willingness to have their children vaccinated against HPV. Factors associated with cervical cancer awareness included knowledge of HPV (Khokana: Odds Ratio (OR)=24.5; (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 3.1-190.2, Sanphebagar: OR=14.8; 95% CI: 3.7-58.4)) and sexually transmitted infections (Khokana: OR=6.18; 95% CI: 3.1-12.4; Sanphebagar: OR=17.0; 95% CI: 7.3-39.7) among other risk factors. Conclusions: Knowledge and awareness of HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine remains low among women in Khokana and Sanphebagar. Acceptance of a freely available HPV vaccine for children was high, indicating potentially high uptake rates in these communities.

Does the Success of a School-based HPV Vaccine Programme Depend on Teachers' Knowledge and Religion? - a Survey in a Multicultural Society

  • Woo, Yin Ling;Razali, Sharina Mohd;Chong, Kuoh Ren;Omar, Siti Zawiah
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.9
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    • pp.4651-4654
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    • 2012
  • Organized introduction of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination can reduce the burden of cervical cancer in developing countries. One of the most effective ways is through a national school-based program. Information on teachers is therefore important since this group may have a disproportionate influence in the success of any implementation. Objective: To assess teachers' knowledge and perception of HPV, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine prior to commencing a school-based HPV vaccination program in a multiethnic, predominantly Muslim country. Factors associated with acceptability of the vaccine were identified. Method: A bilingual questionnaire was applied to 1,500 secondary school teachers from 20 urban schools in Malaysia. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: 1,166 questionnaires were returned. From this group, 46.1% had never heard of HPV while 50.9% had never had a pap smear. However, 73.8% have heard of the HPV vaccine with 75% agreeing to have it. 96% considered themselves religious with 79.8% agreeing to have the vaccine. Conclusions: A national school-based HPV immunization program can be implemented effectively in a multiethnic, cultural and religious country despite limited knowledge of HPV-related pathology among teachers. In addition, the perception that religion has a negative influence on such a program is unwarranted.

Mothers' HPV-related Knowledge in an Area (일 지역 어머니의 HPV 관련 지식도)

  • Kang, Moon-Hee
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.11 no.3
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    • pp.193-199
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    • 2011
  • Purpose: This study was aimed to examine mothers'knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV)vaccination to prevent cervical cancer in Korea. Methods: From September 20 to October 10 2011, 101 mothers who have adolescent girls were surveyed with questionnaires about their general characteristics, the knowledge of HPV vaccine, inoculation rate and vaccination-related factors of their daughters. Results: The percentage of correct answers for HPV vaccine knowledge was 24.2% and the HPV vaccination rate was only 5.9%. HPV vaccine knowledge score of the vaccination group was significantly higher than that of the non-vaccinated group. Mothers said that the reasons why they didn't vaccinate their daughters against the HPV was the financial burden, the lack of HPV knowledge, and worries about possible side effects. The participants addressed that they understood the appropriate age for vaccination was sixteen. Conclusion: We recommend that more educational and promotional efforts need to be given for mothers in order to improve their knowledge of HPV vaccination and to increase the performance rates of HPV immunization against cervical cancer for their daughters.