• Title, Summary, Keyword: H. pylori infection

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Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Carcinogenesis (Helicobacter pylori와 위암발생)

  • Myong, You-Ho;Choi, Yung-Hyun
    • Journal of Life Science
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    • v.17 no.7
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    • pp.1002-1018
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    • 2007
  • Ever since the World Health Organization classified Helicobacter pylori as a class I carcinogen, a variety of discussions over the actual role of H. pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis has existed. Although a majority of researches support the positive correlation between H. pylori infection and the development of gastric cancer, many aspects of this association are yet uncertain, and some data even suggest that there may be no correlation between H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis. However, there are proofs indicating these reports underestimated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and therefore, the association of the infection and gastric adenocarcinoma. In this report, I reviewed the epidemiology of H. pylori and gastric cancer, evidence supporting and against the positive correlation of the infection and the disease, and the possible pathological role H. pylori infection may have in gastric carcinogenesis referring particular to published literature. As a conclusion, despite a few reports of a possible negative or no relationship between gastric cancer and H. pylori infection, I was able to find that H. pylori infection did have a pathological role in the development of gastric cancer.

Elder ages decreases the susceptibility for Helicobacter pylori infection in an animal model (Helicobacter pylori의 감수성과 숙주 연령과의 상관성 연구)

  • Lee, Jin-Uk;Kim, Seung-Hee;Park, Tan-Woo;Kim, Okjin
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.47 no.1
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    • pp.77-84
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    • 2007
  • Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes chronic gastritisand is associated with gastroduodenal ulcer disease, adenocarcinoma of the distal stomach, and gastricH. pylori infection associated with host agehave not been well-defined in human. To evaluate the difference in host susceptibility to infection in relationto age of acquisition of H. pylori infection, we designed an experiment involving inoculation of H. pyloriATC 43504 at different ages of Mongolian gerbils. H. pylori was inoculated at 5 weeks and 18 monthsof age, as representatives of early and late infection, respectively. Animals were sacrificed 1 week and 4weeks after challenge, and the stomach was removed from each animal for bacterial culture, histologicalexamination, and polymerase chain reaction test. 5 week-old gerbils revealed infection andmaintained continuously its infection until 4 weeks. However, old gerbils did not maintained H. pyloriinfection. These data suggest the insusceptibility of H. pylori in old Mongolian gerbils and the importanceof animal ages for successful animal experimental infection. Also, the results demonstrated that earlyinfection of H. pylori increases its host susceptibility, as compared to the case with later infection, possiblybecause of differences in host gastric mucosal factors and imunologic responses.

Clinical Characteristics and Helicobacter pylori Status of Gastric Cancer in Thailand

  • Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn;Panarat, Wirat;Aekpongpaisit, Surasak;Mahachai, Voracha
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.20
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    • pp.9005-9008
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    • 2014
  • Background: Gastric cancer is the second leading course of cancer death worldwide and H. pylori infection is an important risk factor for gastric cancer development. This study was design to evaluate the clinical, pathological features, survival rate and prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer in Thailand. Materials and Methods: Clinical information, histological features, endoscopic findings and H. pylori status were collected from gastric cancer patients from Thammasat university hospital during June 1996-December 2011. H. pylori infection was assessed by histological evaluation, rapid urease test and serological test. Clinical information, endoscopic findings and histopathology of all patients were recorded and compared between patients with active or non-active H. pylori infection. Results: A total of 100 gastric cancer patients (55 men and 45 women with mean age of $55{\pm}16.8years$) were enrolled in this study. Common presenting symptoms were dyspepsia (74%), weight loss (66%), anemia (63%) and anorexia (38%). Mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 98 days. Overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 83% and active H. pylori infection was 40%. 1-year and 5-year survival rates were 43% and 0%. There was no significant difference between active H. pylori infection in different locations (proximal vs non-proximal: 47.1% vs 48.5%; P-value = 0.9, OR=0.9; 95%CI=0.3-3.1) and histology of gastric cancer (diffuse type vs intestinal type: 47.4% vs 50%; P-value = 0.8, OR=0.9, 95%CI=0.3-2.7). However, linitis plastica was significantly more common in non-active than active H. pylori infection (27.9% vs 0%; P-value<0.0001, OR=13.3, 95%CI=3.2-64.5). Moreover, gastric cancer stage 4 was higher in non-active than active H. pylori infection (93% vs 50%, P-value<0.001). Conclusions: Prevalence of H. pylori infection in Thai gastric cancer patients was high but active infection was low. Most gastric cancer patients presented in advance stage and had a grave prognosis. Screening for gastric cancer in high risk individuals might be an appropriate tool for early detection and improve the treatment outcome for this particular disease in Thailand.

H. pylori-associated Iron-Deficiency Anemia (Helicobacter pylori 관련 철분 결핍 빈혈)

  • Choe, Yon Ho
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.129-138
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    • 2006
  • Lots of cases relating Helicobacter pylori infection to iron-deficiency anemia have been described in the literature and H. pylori infection has emerged as a cause of refractory iron-deficiency anemia which is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. H. pylori-associated iron-deficiency anemia can be treated by H. pylori eradication. It is not thought to be attributable to gastrointestinal blood loss, such as duodenal ulcer. The mechanism by which H. pylori infection contributes to iron-deficiency anemia remains unclear. However, four possible explanations can be posited for this relationship; occult blood loss secondary to chronic gastritis, reduced iron absorption due to hypo- or achlorhydria, increased iron consumption by H. pylori, and iron sequestration in gastric mucosa. H. pylori-associated iron-deficiency anemia seems to develop in populations at increased risk for iron depletion. When pubescent girls, including athletes, are found to have iron-deficiency anemia refractory to iron administration, they should be evaluated for H. pylori infection.

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Antibiotics resistance of Helicobacter pylori and treatment modalities in children with H. pylori infection

  • Seo, Ji-Hyun;Woo, Hyang-Ok;Youn, Hee-Shang;Rhee, Kwang-Ho
    • Korean Journal of Pediatrics
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    • v.57 no.2
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    • pp.67-71
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    • 2014
  • Pediatric infection with Helicobacter pylori may occur early in childhood and persist lifelong. Global pediatric clinical studies have reported a decreasing tendency in the overall rate of H. pylori eradication. In pediatric patients with H. pylori infection, pediatric patients with peptic ulcer, and the first-degree relatives of patients with a history of gastric cancer, it is commonly recommended that H. pylori strains be eradicated. Antibiotic drug resistance to H. pylori, which has been reported to vary widely between geographic regions, is mainly associated with treatment failure in these patients. It is therefore imperative that the antibiotic resistance rates of H. pylori in children and adolescents be meticulously monitored across countries and throughout geographic regions. This paper particularly focuses on the antibiotic drug resistance of H. pylori and the thearpy of pediatric H. pylori infection cases.

Relationship between Intestinal Metaplasia and Neutrophilic Infiltration of Stomach Caused by Helicobacter pylori Infection (위 Helicobacter pylori 감염 및 중성구침윤과 장상피화생의 연관성)

  • Park, Kang-Hoon
    • Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science
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    • v.37 no.3
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    • pp.190-196
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    • 2005
  • Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is uncommon in developed countries, yet is common in underdeveloped and developing countries. Infection rate of H. pylori is minimally influenced by economic, environmental, and public health status and genetic factors. Korea is a developing country with a high incidence of H. pylori infection and gastric carcinoma, which is one of the leading causes of death. For this reason, accurate clinical and pathologic data on H. pylori-associated disease are very important. Intestinal metaplasia accompanies chronic gastritis and increases the risk of gastric carcinoma. For this reason, the relationship between H. pylori infection and intestinal metaplasia is very closely linked. Because of this, as the antecedent condition is guessed, it examines the relationship of the H. pylori and the intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia is thought to be the basis in the development of intestinal type gastric carcinomas. Recent investigations showed that inflammatory reaction in the gastric fundus affect the development of gastric carcinogenesis. To verify neutrophilic activity in the gastric fundus and development of intestinal metaplasia in both gastric fundus and antral mucosa, their relationship was studied using 159 healthy patients who had undergone gastric endoscopic biopsies without any identifiable pathologic disesaes. When neutrophilic activity accompanied, incidence of intestinal metaplasia was significantly increased (p<0.05). H. pylori infection was statistically and significantly associated with the presence of intestinal metaplasia (p<0.05). These results suggest that H. pylori infection affected the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach. These results will help our understanding of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of intestinal metaplasia, a preneoplastic condition of the stomach. To reduce the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma, eradication treatment of H. pylori is recommended when there's a neutrophilic activity in the gastric fundus.

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Updates on the Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: What Are the Differences between Adults and Children?

  • Yang, Hye Ran
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.96-103
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    • 2016
  • Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired mainly during childhood and causes various diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and iron deficiency anemia. Although H. pylori infection in children differs from adults in many ways, this is often overlooked in clinical practice. Unlike adults, nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. Histopathological findings of gastric tissues are also different in children due to predominance of lymphocytes and plasma cells and the formation of gastric MALT. Although endoscopy is recommended for the initial diagnosis of H. pylori infection, several non-invasive diagnostic tests such as the urea breath test (UBT) and the H. pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) are available and well validated even in children. According to recent data, both the $^{13}C$-UBT and HpSA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are reliable non-invasive tests to determine H. pylori status after eradication therapy, although children younger than 6 years are known to have high false positives. When invasive or noninvasive tests are applied to children to detect H. pylori infection, it should be noted that there are differences between children and adults in diagnosing H. pylori infection.

Status of Helicobacter pylori Infection among Migrant Workers in Shijiazhuang, China

  • Xia, Pu;Ma, Ming-Feng;Wang, Wei
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.4
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    • pp.1167-1170
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    • 2012
  • Background: Helicobacter pylori infection leads to many upper gastrointestinal diseases. Migrant workers are the main part of floating population in China. However, up to now, their health status has not been a focus of attention. Methods: In order to assess the status of H. pylori infection among migrant workers in Shijiazhuang, over five years we interviewed 324 individuals between 2007 and 2011. Each underwent a rapid urease test to identify H. pylori infection and socio-demographic indicators were collected using a survey questionnaire. Results: Our results showed that family income (P = 0.003), dietetic hygiene (P = 0.005), education (P = 0.004) and marital status (P = 0.007) were associated with H. pylori infection. Conclusion: We found that migrant workers had little basic knowledge of H. pylori and their prevalence of infection remains high. Therefore, we need to promote education and awareness of H. pylori and to ensure access to diagnosis and treatment for infected workers.

Risk Factors for and Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection among Healthy Inhabitants in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia

  • Goto, Yasuyuki;Syam, Ari Fahrial;Darnindro, Nikko;Hapsari, Florentina Carolin Puspita
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.9
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    • pp.4469-4475
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    • 2016
  • Indonesia is a developing country, in most of which the infection rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have been reported to be high. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in Indonesia has been unexpectedly reported to be low. The purpose of our study was to confirm whether the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low among healthy inhabitants in Northern Jakarta by 13C-urea breath test (UBT), and to examine the association of their lifestyle/environmental factors with H. pylori infection and to identify potential routes of transmission. We recruited a total of 196 subjects from a low-income community in Northern Jakarta, Indonesia. Of them, 193 subjects who completed a questionnaire about their lifestyle/environment and had UBT were included in this study. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for sex and age with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression model. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 15.0%. There was difference in H. pylori infection rates among Buginese (40.0%), Betawi (9.1%), Sundanese (3.7%), and Batak (9.1%). After multivariate analysis, the ORs of intake of soybean milk, cucumber more than one time a week, infrequent hand washing before meals, and alcohol consumption were 0.10 (95%CI: 0.01-0.97), 6.61 (95%CI: 1.87-23.3), 4.10 (95%CI: 1.15-14.6), and 61.9 for former drinkers (95%CI: 1.67-2300.8), respectively. Buginese (OR=7.84; 95%CI: 1.82-33.8) and Batak ethnic groups (OR=20.1; 95%CI: 1.90-213.2) were infected more frequently, compared with Javanese. The H. pylori infection rate in this study was low, as reported previously. After we scrutinized the factors, Buginese and Batak ethnic groups eat food using fingers more frequently than Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese. In addition, infrequent hand wash practice before meal increased the risk. Our study indicated that person-person transmission was possible in this low prevalence area. The low infection rates of H. pylori among those of Javanese, Betawi, and Sundanese ethnicity could be partly due to sanitary practice.

Helicobacter pylori in the Oral Cavity (구강 내 Helicobacter pylori)

  • Ahn, Jong-Mo
    • Journal of Oral Medicine and Pain
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    • v.37 no.2
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    • pp.75-79
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    • 2012
  • Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) associated with gastritis and gastric cancer is mainly detected dental plaque and saliva in the oral cavity. Most infection is probably acquired in childhood, but the route of transmission is not clear. The oral cavity has been indicated as secondary reservoir of H. pylori, and may therefore be argued in the route of transmission and reinfection of the stomach which follows treatment of H. pylori infection. So this review aimed to discuss about H. pylori in the oral cavity. H. pylori in stomach can appear in the oral cavity by gastroesophageal reflex or vomiting, but infection of stomach and oral cavity is different. Diagnostic methods are serological method, urea breath test, PCR method, urease test, histologic method and so on. Nested PCR recommend for detection of H. pylori in saliva and dental plaque. H. pylori infection in the oral cavity appear variously and is no relation with dental diseases. The antimicrobial mouthrinse recommend in patients with periodontal diseases because of high detection rate fo H. pylori. Thus H. pylori may be considered as the normal oral microflora.