• Title, Summary, Keyword: Goryeo Dynasty

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A Comparative Study of Plant Patterns Found in the Textiles of Goryeo and its Neighbor Countries (고려와 주변국 직물에 표현된 식물무늬 비교 연구)

  • Yeom, Ha-Ryoung;Cho, Hyo-Sook
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.59 no.9
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    • pp.71-86
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    • 2009
  • This study examines plant patterns expressed on the fabrics during the Goryeo Dynasty and many countries in the Chinese continent and analyzes their symbolism and formativeness. This study deals with clothes which is one of the most fundamental aspects in a culture and plant patterns on them; it examines the overall formativeness of plant patterns in East Asia from the 10th century to the 14th century by studying plant patterns in the Goryeo Dynasty and the contemporaneous dynasties in the Chinese continent - Five Dynasties, Song Dynasty, Western Xia Dynasty, Liao Dynasty, Jin Dynasty and Yuan Dynasty. The plant patterns of each country were categorized by the type of plant. The composition and expression of plant patterns were examined and statistically analyzed. Small flowers were found in Goryeo fabrics twice more than other types that could be clearly identified, and peony was the most popular flower used in Chinese fabrics. In terms of composition of plant patterns, both Goryeo and Chinese fabrics had plant only patterns more frequently than the patterns mixed with animals or jewels. Regarding expression methods of plant patterns, the most common one in Goryeo fabrics was the petal-type, while the branch-type is the most common one in Chinese fabrics. The plant patterns of the Goryeo Dynasty show beauty of simplicity with minimalism and simplification while expressed with brilliant sold threads on dark background, such as purple or light green, so the overall feeling of fabrics was simple yet nobel.

ANALYSIS OF REIGN STYLE AND CALENDAR DAY PRESENTED IN THE EPIGRAPHS OF THE GORYEO DYNASTY (고려시대 금석문에 나타난 연호와 역일 기록 분석)

  • LEE, KI-WON;AHN, YOUNG SOOK;MIHN, BYEONG-HEE
    • Publications of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.1-9
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    • 2016
  • We investigate the records related to the reign style and the calendar day from the epigraphs of the Goryeo dynasty (918 - 1392) in Korea in order to verify and supplement the sexagenary cycle data of the first day in the lunar month of the dynasty. The database of the National Research Institute of Culture Heritage contains a rubbed-copy image, transcription statement, and translation statement for Korean epigraphs as well as 775 epigraphs corresponding to the Goryeo dynasty. The epigraph records are valuable in that, during this time, they were written differently from other historical literature such as the Goryeosa (History of the Goryeo Dynasty), which was compiled in the next dynasty. We find that the Goryeo dynasty, in general, had adopted the reign styles of Chinese dynasties at that time. We also find 159 calendar day records all showing good agreement with the work of Ahn et al. except for dozens of records. Through this study, we can verify the reign styles and the calendar days of the Goryeo dynasty.

Characteristics of Jeogori Found in the Gwan-eum Bodhisattva Statue in Bogwang Temple of Goryeo Dynasty (보광사 고려시대 관음보살좌상(觀音菩薩坐像) 복장(腹藏) 저고리의 특성)

  • Park, Yoon-Mee
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.59 no.10
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    • pp.1-9
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    • 2009
  • One piece of Jeogori and several books of the Goryeo dynasty were found inside of the wooden Buddhist Goddess of Mercy Statue of the Bogwang temple and they were designated as national treasure of Korea, No. 1571. The jeogori was the Jeogsam as the kind of underwear and conjectured as for women by considering its size. The collar of the jeogori was 3cm-wide square-shaped collar without gussit and the sleeve was close to straight line. Also the jeogori was designed without breast ties and could be adjusted by knot button. The fabrics for the jeogori showed similar pattern as complex silk gauze in 1302. It has not been reported yet that the complex silk gauze was used for the Jeogsam from Goryeo Dynasty to Joseon Dynasty. Comparing the Jeogori of the Bogwang temple to those of Goryeo Dynasty, it can be appropriately estimated as the remains of the Goryeo Dynasty since its shape and materials are very similar to those found in the Jeogori's of the Goryeo Dynasty and it was found between the books of the Goryeo Dynasty inside of the knee part of the wooden Buddhist Goddess of Mercy Statue of the Bogwang temple. Although only one piece of Jeogori was found, it's importance in cultural value or in the study of the fabric history cannot be underestimated considering the fact that the Jeogories of the Goryeo Dynasty are scarce, and that the used fabric was not commonly used complex silk gauze, and especially that this Jeogori is the only existing Jeogsam made of complex silk gauze.

The Adaptation of Sangrokhadan Technique on the Color Painting of Wooden Buildings in the Goryeo Dynasty (고려시대 목조건축물의 상록하단(上綠下丹) 단청기법 수용)

  • Lee, Eun-Hee
    • Journal of architectural history
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    • v.25 no.5
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    • pp.15-25
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    • 2016
  • The color that painted on the ground of Dancheong becomes Gachil(basecoat)-Dancheong and underpainting of Moro-Dancheong or Geum-Dancheong. So, the color of underpainting is the most important element that determines impression of the building. Thus, the architecture after using "Sangrokhadan" has different characters from what it had been. In the existing perception toward the background color of Dancheong, it was considered the characters of Korean Dancheong so-called "Sangrokhadan" that paint vertical elements like columns red and upper part of the columns green. But this study examined the color of Dancheong according to the era and region before and after Goryeo Dynasty era, then it reveals that Sangrokhadan technique was applied from the 14th century in the late Goryeo Dynasty. One of the Goryeo architecture, Geungnakjeon Hall of Bongjeongsa Temple is thought to be a previous style that is not applied "Sangrokhadan" technique because old elements are painted red pigment.

A Study on the Sangnyang-mun of the Palaces and Government Offices in Goryeo Dynasty (고려시대 궁실건축 상량문 연구)

  • Seo, Chi-Sang
    • Journal of architectural history
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    • v.25 no.6
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    • pp.45-60
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    • 2016
  • Sangnyang-mun(上樑文) is not only a memorial address for the ceremony of putting up the ridge beam, namely the sangnyang-ceremony(上樑式) but also the executional record of building construction. This paper aims at researching on the oldest five sangnyang-muns written for the constructions of palaces and government offices in Goryeo Dynasty, especially viewed in the architectural history. The results of that are as follows: First, it is supposed that sangnyang-mun originated in the ancient Chinese ceremonial songs for the celebration of building construction. Second, as compared against the former times, the sangnyang-muns in Goryeo Dynasty were written to the advanced establishing forms and literary patterns, so to speak, these were the more developed styles. Third, in the 12th century, sangnyang-mun was introduced from Chinese Song to Goryeo. To the late period of J oseon Dynasty, sangnyang-mun had been to write for the sangnyang-ceremony as necessary memorial address. Fourth, the writers of five sangnyang-muns in Goryeo Dynasty were the new civil ministers appointed by the soldier rulers. They wrote the contents of their sangnyang-muns, especially focused to the king's achievements. And in the yugwi-song(六衛頌), they recited six poems in which were complicated the world view and aesthetics of the time.

Analysis of Korean Historical Records of Comet Halley

  • Lee, Ki-Won
    • The Bulletin of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.37 no.2
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    • pp.102.1-102.1
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    • 2012
  • In this paper, we analyzed Korean historical records of the periodic comet Halley in three periods (Three Kingdoms, the Goryeo dynasty, and the Joseon dynasty) using various sources such as Samguksagi (History of the Three Kingdoms), Goryeosa (History of the Goryeo Dynasty), and Joseonwangjosillok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty). To determine the apparition time of the comet at each return, we referred to the works of Kronk. For the Three Kingdoms period, we could not find any record relevant to Halley's comet from Samguksagi. Instead, we examined the suggestion that the phenomenon two Suns appearing on April 1, 760 (in a luni-solar calendar), which is recorded in Samgukyusa (Renaissance of the Three Kingdoms), indicates an appearance of comet Halley during the daytime. In contrast, we found that all the returns of Halley's comet during the Goryeo dynasty are recorded, although some accounts are questioned. In addition, we found that the appearance of Halley's comet in 1145 is also mentioned in a spirit-path stele made in 1178. For the Joseon dynasty period, we found that all the returns of the comet are recorded, as with the Goryeo dynasty, except for the return of 1910, in which the former dynasty fell. In conclusion, we think that this study will be helpful for understanding Korean historical accounts of Halley's comet.

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Korean Historical Records on Halley's Comet Revisited

  • Lee, Ki-Won;Mihn, Byeong-Hee;Ahn, Young Sook
    • Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences
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    • v.31 no.3
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    • pp.215-223
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    • 2014
  • In this paper, we report the analysis of Korean historical records on the periodic Halley's comet according to the period (i.e., the Three Kingdoms, Goryeo Dynasty, and Joseon Dynasty) using various sources such as the Samguksagi (The History of the Three Kingdoms), Goryeosa (The History of the Goryeo Dynasty), and Joseonwangjosillok (The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty). With regards to the apparition time of the comet for each return, we referred to the works of Kronk. For the Three Kingdoms period, we could not find any record relevant to Halley's comet from the Samguksagi. Furthermore, we examined the suggestion that the phenomenon of "two Suns" which appeared on April 1, 760 (in a luni-solar calendar), as recorded in the Samgukyusa (The Legends and History of the Three Kingdoms), indicates an instance of the the daytime appearance of Halley's comet. In contrast with the Three Kingdoms period, we found that all returns of Halley's comet are recorded during the Goryeo Dynasty, although others have questioned some accounts. We also found that the appearance of Halley's comet in 1145 is mentioned in a spirit-path stele made in 1178. For the Joseon Dynasty period, we found that all apparitions of the comet are recorded, as with the Goryeo Dynasty, except for the return of 1910, at which time the former dynasty had fallen. In conclusion, we think that this study will be helpful for understanding Korean historical accounts on Halley's comet.

A Study on the Restoration of the Layout of the Main Palace of Goryeo Dynasty (고려정궁 내부 배치의 복원연구)

  • Woo, Seong-Hoon;Lee, Sang-Hae
    • Journal of architectural history
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    • v.15 no.3
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    • pp.59-79
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    • 2006
  • The architectural characteristics and historical positioning which the historical architecture will be understood better through collecting results from researches which was done on various points of views and positions. Therefore, a study on the layout of the main palace of Goryeo Dynasty also becomes a prerequisite for understanding the architectural characteristics and historical positioning which it possesses. However, the reality is that as the results from the excavation and preceding researches were not integrated together, the understanding of the layout of main palace is remaining on a partial and conceptual level. Therefore, this paper attempted to review in overall the restoration of the layout of the main palace of Goryeo Dynasty using historical documents, precedent researches, excavation maps, topographical map and cadastral maps. Consequently, it was possible to confirm the name of some of the ruins and restore the location and layout of other buildings. The result of this research presented above, will become a basis for understanding the layout of the main palace of Goryeo Dynasty in more realistic and way. Furthermore, it could be used as a fundamental data for related researches.

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Study on the Period of the Use of Datong-li in Korea

  • Lee, Ki-Won;Ahn, Young-Sook;Mihn, Byeong-Hee;Lim, Young-Ryan
    • Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences
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    • v.27 no.1
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    • pp.55-68
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    • 2010
  • It has been generally known that Datong-li (a Chinese calendar in the Ming dynasty) was first introduced into Korea in the nineteenth reign of King Gongmin (1370) of the Goryeo dynasty and lasted to the third reign of King Hyeojong (1652) of the Joseon dynasty. This understanding is based on the records of Goryeo-sa (History of the Goryeo dynasty) and of Seoungwan-ji (Official book of Seoungwan)/Jeungbomunheon-bigo (Explanatory Notes of Library Document). To verify the period of the use of Datong-li in Korea, we develop a Fortran code to calculate the calendar day by Datong-li and also investigate historical literatures and extant almanacs. As a result, we find the possibility that Datong-li had been in use since 1389 at least. However, we cannot confirm whether Datong-li was first enforced in 1370 or not. On the other hand, we confirm that Datong-li was used until 1653 and reintroduced during the period from 1667 to 1669. Also, we find that previous studies had some errors in the sexagenary cycle of the real first day of a month. We think that this study will contribute to understanding the calendrical history of the Joseon dynasty.