• Title/Summary/Keyword: Good doctors

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Two Aims of Medical Humanities Education: Good Doctors and Happy Doctors (인문사회의학 교육의 두 목표: 좋은 의사, 행복한 의사)

  • You, Hojong
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.51-56
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    • 2015
  • Recently, medical humanities education has begun to take up an increased proportion of the Korean medical curriculum. Many people now agree that not only basic medicine and clinical medicine but also medical humanities is needed in medical education. The aims of medical humanities education should dawn now. 'Medical humanities' can be roughly defined as "the interdisciplinary study and activity at the intersection of the humanities, social science, arts, and medicine." People tend to assume that the aim of medical humanities education is to produce good doctors, that is, physicians who contribute to society. Actually, cultivating good doctors is one of the proper aims of medical humanities education. In addition to it, another aim of medical humanities education should be cultivating happy doctors. Nowadays, many of Korea's physicians feel unhappy. In such a situation, medical humanities education should be aimed at developing happiness in medical trainees.

The Admission Interview in Medical Schools (의과대학에서의 입학면접)

  • Roh, HyeRin
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.12 no.2
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    • pp.13-18
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    • 2010
  • This study is aimed to reflect non-cognitive traits that should be assessed in admissions interviews for medical school applicants, with the goal being to increase the reliability of the admissions interview. The admissions interview is valued for its ability to assess noncognitive and nonteachable attributes of good doctors, especially which cannot be evaluated with other admission assessment tools. Various characteristics of applicants including age, gender, exam scores, and nonverbal communication were found to have influenced the interview results. Bias from interviewers was a significant factor in the results of the interview. A Structured interview in multiple stations such as the Multiple Mini-Interview showed the highest reliability and validity. To make the interview fair, no information about the applicants was provided to the interviewers and interviewers were recruited from different backgrounds. There have been few research papers on admission interviews in Korea. Active research on the qualities of good doctors and effective and reliable admission interview methods should be encouraged. A strategy should be developed to overcome the philosophical obstacles that medical school professors want to admit academically excellent applicants.

Enhancement of Professionalism in Medical Education (전문직업성 배양을 위한 의학교육)

  • Lee, Young-Hwan
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.11-18
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    • 2012
  • The purpose of this article is to discuss the enhancement of medical professionalism and the artisan spirit proposed by Yu and to suggest curriculum content and methods to improve medical professionalism. Professionals are those who can share their knowledge with others and proceed under self-reflection on moral values and social expectations. The goal of medical education is to cultivate students to be good as well as to do well. To achieve this goal, educators should foster students to be good doctors for 99% of patients, rather than to be high performers for 1% of patients. There are two types of curriculum for medical professionalism: hidden and formative curricula. In these curricula, we doctors may be good role models for medical students. The curriculum contents and the methods for implementation that are based on accumulated experience can be embedded into education on professionalism. In addition, as suggested by Miller, how to evaluate medical professionalism based on a framework of clinical assessment must be discussed. Finally, it is suggested that the process of education on medical professionalism should be a kind of cultural movement to raise good doctors.

Education of Medical humanities and Social Medicine in Schools of Korean Medicine in Korea (전국 한의과대학 및 한의학전문대학원의 인문사회의학교육 현황)

  • Cheon, Mog-Eun;Lim, Byung-Mook;Shin, Sang-Woo
    • Journal of Society of Preventive Korean Medicine
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.31-42
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    • 2012
  • Objective : To set up the concept and the category of the medical humanities in Korean medicine education through researching and analysing the curriculum of 12 colleges and school of Korean medicine (KM) in Korea. Methods : We collected self-evaluation reports from 12 KM institutions, and analyzed subjects regarding medical humanities and social medicine. The subjects' relevance with medical humanities was verified using the learning objectives of KOMEEI(Korea Oriental Medicine Education and Evaluation Institute). The number of relevant subjects, the credits and educational hours, and the time of opening, etc. were analysed. Results : 12 KM institutions provide 44 subjects as medical humanities and social medicine related subjects. Among them, 17 subjects were corresponded to the actual learning objective of medical humanities. These subjects account for an average of 7% in total curriculum. Most of the subjects are required courses for premedical students and the fourth year students of medical school. Conclusions : This paper suggests the public discussion on the learning objective and the categories of the medical humanities education in KM institutions. Further studies on developing the educational contents and evaluation tools are also needed to produce good doctors with ability and personality.

Premedical Curriculum in Seoul National University College of Medicine (서울대학교 의과대학 의예과 교육과정 개발과 편성 사례)

  • Yoon, Hyun Bae;Lee, Seung-Hee;Hwang, Jinyoung
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.134-137
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    • 2017
  • The main points of issue with the former premedical curriculum of Seoul National University College of Medicine (SNUCM) were the absence of educational objectives, decline in student motivation caused by uniform education, students' lack of a sense of belonging, and lack of humanistic education. In accordance with these issues, there were five aspects considered for the improvement of the premedical curriculum: reform based on the newly established educational objectives that corresponds with the 6-year medical school curriculum as a whole, expansion of elective courses and the development of personalized curriculum for the improvement of students' learning motives, expansion of social sciences and humanities curriculum for the development of students' capabilities as good doctors, active participation of medical professors in premedical education, and expansion of informal education and the student support program. According to the assessment done after the implementation of the reformed curriculum, premedical students were gratified with its establishment and management of multifarious liberal arts and major subjects. In preparation of the more rigorous entrance quota of the premedical school at SNUCM, there is ongoing reform of required major subjects and establishment of new subjects in the premedical curriculum in pursuit of unity with the 6-year medical curriculum. Moreover, there is ongoing development of an e-portfolio system for the association of premedical and medical education, integration of formal and informal curriculum, and reinforcement of student observation and formative evaluation. Further discussion on the assessment and betterment of premedical curriculum is needed.