• Title/Summary/Keyword: Fishmeal

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A Study on the Supply and Demand of Fishmeal and Stable Securing Strategies (양어용 어분의 수급 실태 및 안정적 확보 방안)

  • Kim, Dae-Young;Lee, Jung-Sam;Lee, Heon-Dong
    • The Journal of Fisheries Business Administration
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    • v.44 no.3
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    • pp.61-76
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    • 2013
  • This study is aimed to present measures for stable supply of fishmeal and to develop fish farming into a food industry and an export industry. The study analyzed current domestic and international supply and demand for fishmeal and suggested future prospects. The results of the study suggested the basic directions for the stable supply of fishmeal in Korea as follows: first, stable securing of fishmeal importers and establishment of the supply and demand monitoring system; second, policies to boost using of compound feeds and expansion of relevant fishmeal use; third, higher competitiveness of fishmeal and compound feeds through selective and intensive R&D investments. Based on the basic directions, the paper suggested implementation measures such as strengthening of cooperations with fishmeal suppliers abroad, expansion of overseas local market entrance, diversification of fishmeal trading countries, revision of relevant laws and polices on the fishmeal and feeds, organization of domestic fishmeal, promotion of group purchase, improvement of domestic fish meal quality, development of fish meal alternatives, etc.

Effects of Dietary Protein Sources and Levels on Heat Production and Thermoregulatory Responses of Sheep Exposed to a High Ambient Temperature

  • Sudarman, A.;Ito, T.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.13 no.11
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    • pp.1523-1528
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    • 2000
  • Four Suffolk ewes were used in Latin Square switch over design to study the effects of varying levels and sources of protein on heat production and thermoregulatory responses at daytime high ($33^{\circ}C$ temperature. They were fed Italian ryegrass hay supplemented with fishmeal and/or urea, providing three different levels of crude protein (CP) (low/unsupplemented: 7.9, medium: 11.6, and high: 15.8%) at $1.5{\times}maintenance$. Feeds were distributed at 0900 (30%) and 1700 (70%). Urea diet caused higher heat production and increased vaginal temperature compared to fishmeal and fishmeal-urea mix diets. Time spent standing, skin temperature and respiration rate of sheep fed urea were similar with those of sheep fed fishmeal. Sheep fed diet with low CP level had higher heat production, increased vaginal and skin temperature than sheep fed diet with medium CP content. Sheep on high CP diet produced significantly more heat than sheep fed medium CP diets. Their vaginal temperatures were similar with those of sheep fed medium CP diet but lower than those of sheep fed low CP diet. Respiration rates of sheep and time spent by them for standing on all diets did not differ significantly. These results suggest that urea is inferior protein supplement for thermoregulation of animal at hot environment, as it induced higher heat production than fishmeal and fishmeal-urea mix. Thermoregulatory response on fishmeal-urea mix diet was similar to fishmeal diet. Increasing CP of the diet from low to medium gives advantage for thermoregulation of animal. Increasing CP further to high level was not beneficial as it resulted in the responses of sheep similar to those on low protein diet.

Histological Effects of Fishery By-product Fermented Fishmeal on the Liver and Muscle of the Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus (수산부산물 발효어분이 넙치(Paralichthys olivaceu)의 간 및 근육에 미치는 영향에 관한 조직학적 연구)

  • Lee, Bo-Ram;Kim, Ji-Hye
    • Journal of Life Science
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    • v.29 no.11
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    • pp.1235-1240
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    • 2019
  • The aim of this study was to clarify histologically the effects of fermented fishmeal on the growth rate of fish. For this purpose, olive flounders were fed on fermented fishmeal at the substitution ratios of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%, and the effects on the liver and muscle were examined by microscopy. The olive flounder fed on fermented fishmeal at the 25% substitution ratio had the best hepatic condition, as indicated by the highest hepatosomatic index and the lowest fatty liver level, when compared with fish fed the other substitution ratios. The olive flounder fed on fermented fishmeal at the 25% substitution ratio had good motility, based on the presence of wide myocytes. The high growth rate in the olive flounder fed on fermented fishmeal at the 25% substitution ratio therefore seemed to be related to the health status of the liver and muscles. Higher amounts of the fermented fishmeal (75% and 100% substitution ratios) suppressed the growth rate due to adverse effects on hepatic function and motility of the olive flounder.

Complete reuse of raw fishmeal wastewater: Evidence from a field cultivation study and economic analysis

  • Kang, Jang Ho;Jung, Hyun Yi;Kim, Joong Kyun
    • Environmental Engineering Research
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    • v.23 no.3
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    • pp.271-281
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    • 2018
  • To examine the feasibility of reuse of raw fishmeal wastewater, it was biodegraded by a microbial consortium in a $1-m^3$ reactor, and the final culture broth including mixed microbes was applied as biofertilizer to field cultivation of lettuce and Chinese cabbage. Moreover, economic analysis of the entire process was performed. A stable metabolism of organic matter degradation for 80 h with sufficient dissolved oxygen produced an amino acid content of 14.66 g per 100 g sample, along with increased cation and anion concentrations. The concentrations of N, P and K in the final culture broth were 2.26, 0.87 and 0.65%, respectively, while those of heavy metals were very low. In field cultivation of the two leafy vegetables, the biodegraded fishmeal wastewater showed better fertilizing ability than commercial fertilizers because of its high amino acid content. In addition, no external damage to leaves by the fertilization was observed. In economic analysis, the expected profitability from the practical reuse of raw fishmeal wastewater was estimated to be $491.68 per a single biodegradation, which corresponds to $25,567.36 per year. As a result, the complete reuse of fishmeal wastewater could be feasible and provide essential benefits.

Effects of three different dietary plant protein sources as fishmeal replacers in juvenile whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

  • Bae, Jinho;Hamidoghli, Ali;Djaballah, Marouane Sad;Maamri, Salha;Hamdi, Ayoub;Souffi, Ismai;Farris, Nathaniel Wesley;Bai, Sungchul C.
    • Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.23 no.1
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    • pp.2.1-2.6
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    • 2020
  • Background: As the cost of fishmeal continues to rise, there will be a need to optimize the diet by minimizing dietary fishmeal inclusion in aquafeed. In this study, a 7-week experiment was conducted to evaluate soybean meal, fermented soybean meal (soytide), and sesame meal as fishmeal replacers in whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Methods: A 30%-based fishmeal diet was considered as control (CON), six other diets were prepared by replacing 20% or 40% of fishmeal with soybean meal (SB20 and SB40), fermented soybean meal (ST20 and ST40), or sesame meal (SM20 and SM40) from the CON diet. Twenty shrimp with average initial weight of 0.65 ± 0.05 g (mean ± SD) were randomly distributed into 21 tanks (45 L) and fed four times a day. Water temperature was controlled at 28 ± 1 ℃ and aeration was provided by air stones. Results: Weight gain, specific growth rate, feed efficiency, and protein efficiency ratio of shrimp fed CON showed no significant differences compared to shrimp fed all the other diets. However, growth performance of shrimp fed ST20 diet was significantly higher than those of shrimp fed the SM20 and SM40 diets (P < 0.05). Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) of shrimp fed CON, ST20, and ST40 diets was significantly higher than those of shrimp fed the SB40 and SM40 diets. But there were no significant differences among shrimp fed CON, SB20, ST20, ST40, and SM20 diets. Also, lysozyme activity of shrimp fed ST20 diet was significantly higher than those of shrimp fed the SB40 and SM40 diets. Although, lysozyme activity of shrimp fed the CON diet was not significantly different compared to shrimp fed all the other experimental diets. Conclusions: Therefore, SB, ST, and SM could replace 40% of fishmeal based on growth performance and lysozyme. According to the SOD activity, SB and SM could replace 20% of fishmeal and ST could replace 40% of fishmeal in juvenile whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

On-farm evaluation of dietary animal and plant proteins to replace fishmeal in sub-adult olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

  • Choi, Wonsuk;Hamidoghli, Ali;Bae, Jinho;Won, Seonghun;Choi, Youn Hee;Kim, Kang-Woong;Lee, Bong-Joo;Hur, Sang-Woo;Han, Hyonsob;Bai, Sungchul C.
    • Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.23 no.8
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    • pp.22.1-22.8
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    • 2020
  • Background: High demand and low supply of fishmeal due to overexploitation of fisheries resources have resulted in a dramatic increase in the price of this ingredient. Olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) commercial feed contains approximately 60% fishmeal and limited success has been achieved in identifying sustainable alternative protein sources for this species. Methods: An on-farm feeding trial was conducted to compare a basal diet containing 65% as the control (CONT) with two experimental diets replacing 10% of fishmeal by animal protein (AP10) or 20% of fishmeal by animal and plant protein (APP20). Sub-adult olive flounder averaging 327 ± 9.3 g (mean±SD) were fed one of the three diets in triplicate groups for 16 weeks. Results: Weight gain, specific growth rate, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, and survival were not significantly different among fish fed all the experimental diets (P > 0.05). Also, non-specific immune responses (superoxide dismutase and lysozyme activity), serum biochemical parameters, and intestinal villi length were not significantly different among fish fed all the experimental diets (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Therefore, based on growth performance, non-specific immune responses, serum biochemical parameters, and intestinal histology, dietary animal and plant protein mixtures could replace up to 20% of fishmeal in the diet of sub-adult olive flounder.

Tuna by-product meal as a dietary protein source replacing fishmeal in juvenile Korean rockfish Sebastes schlegeli

  • Kim, Kyoung-Duck;Jang, Ji Won;Kim, Kang-Woong;Lee, Bong-Joo;Hur, Sang Woo;Han, Hyon-Sob
    • Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.21 no.8
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    • pp.29.1-29.8
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    • 2018
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the use of tuna by-product meal (TBM) as a substitute for fishmeal in juvenile Korean rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) diets. Five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (4.9 kcal/g) diets were prepared. Control diet (Con) was formulated to contain brown fishmeal, whereas 25, 50, 75, and 100% of fishmeal was substituted with the same percentage of TBM in the TBM25, TBM50, TBM75, and TBM100 diets, respectively. Three replicate groups of fish (initial weight, $29.5{\pm}0.6g$) were fed one of the five diets for 12 weeks. The mean weight gain of fish fed the Con and TBM25 diets was significantly higher than that of fish fed the TBM100 diet (P < 0.05), but it was not significantly different from the weight gain of fish fed the TBM50 and TBM75 diets. The feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratios of fish fed the Con diet were significantly higher than those of fish fed the TBM100 diet (P < 0.05), but were not significantly different from those fed the TBM25, TBM50, and TBM75 diets. The TBM25, TBM50, TBM75, and TBM100 diets had significantly (P < 0.05) lower incidence cost and higher profit index than the Con diet. These results suggest that the tuna by-product meal used in this study could replace up to 75% of fishmeal protein in the diet without reducing growth and feed utilization in juvenile Korean rockfish weighing 29-53 g. By considering feed cost, the TBM 75 diet is recommendable for Korean rockfish farming.

Effects on Growth and Body Composition to Soy Protein Concentrate as a Fishmeal Replacement in Coho Salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (은연어(Oncorhynchus kisutch) 사료내 어분 대체원으로서 대두농축단백의 이용에 따른 성장 및 성분분석)

  • Yoo, Gwangyeol;Choi, Wonsuk;Bae, Jinho;Yun, Hyeonho;Lee, Seunghan;Bai, Sungchul C.
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.54 no.1
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    • pp.118-123
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    • 2021
  • This study was conducted to evaluate plant proteins as a replacement for a fishmeal diet in the rearing of coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch. Twelve groups of 20 fish averaging 34.0±0.62 g were randomly distributed into 12 rectangular tanks (250 L). Four experimental diets included a control diet containing 60% fishmeal (Control), and three other diets that replaced 20% of fishmeal with soy protein concentrate (SPC), fermented soybean protein concentrate (F-SPC), and enzyme-processed soy protein concentrate (E-SPC). At the end of the feeding trial, fish that were fed Control, SPC and E-SPC diets showed significantly higher weight gain, specific growth rate, feed efficiency, and protein efficiency ratio than those that were fed F-SPC diet. However, there were no significant differences among the fish that were fed Control, SPC, and E-SPC diets. No significant differences were observed in crude protein, crude lipid, and ash of whole body among the fish that were fed all the diets. Therefore, these results indicated that 20% of fishmeal could be replaced by E-SPC or SPC without any adverse effects on the growth performance of coho salmon.

Evaluation of Acid-concentrated Soybean Meal as a Fishmeal Replacement and its Digestibility in Diets for Juvenile Olive Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus (넙치(Paralichthys olivaceus) 치어 사료에서 산 가수분해 농축대두박(Acid-concentrated soybean meal)의 어분대체효과 및 소화율 평가)

  • Kim, Sung-Sam;Oh, Dae-Han;Cho, Seong-Jun;Seo, Sang-Hyun;Han, Hyon-Sob;Lee, Kyeong-Jun
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.47 no.6
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    • pp.824-831
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    • 2014
  • This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fishmeal replacement with acid-concentrated soybean meal (ACSBM) on growth performance, blood biochemistry, and ingredient digestibility in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. Six experimental diets were formulated to replace fishmeal protein with ACSBM at 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% (designated ACSBM0, ACSBM20, ACSBM30, ACSBM40, ACSBM50, and ACSBM60, respectively). Triplicate groups of fish (initial fish mean weight: $14.3{\pm}0.03g$) were fed the experimental diets to apparent satiation (twice daily at 08:00 and 18:00 h). After a 12-week feeding trial, a total of 180 healthy fish were randomly distributed into three Guelph system tanks at a density of 60 fish/tank (initial fish mean weight : $50.6{\pm}2.4g$) to test the apparent digestibility coefficients of the ingredients (ACSBM, fishmeal, and soybean meal). Although negative effects were observed with ACSBM40, ACSBM50 and ACSBM60 after 12 weeks of feeding, up to 20% of the fishmeal protein could be successfully replaced with ACSBM without significant growth depression. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values of fish fed the ACSBM50 and ACSBM60 diets were significantly lower than those of fish fed the ACSBM0 diet. Glucose values of fish fed the ACSBM60 diet were significantly higher than those of fish fed the ACSBM0 and ACSBM20 diets. Digestibility of protein in ACSBM and soybean meal was 85.9% and 82.5%, respectively. Results indicated that at least 20% of fishmeal protein can be replaced by ACSBM in diets of juvenile olive flounder without supplementation of limiting amino acids.

Feasibility Study on Production of Liquid Fertilizer in a 1 ㎥ Reactor Using Fishmeal Wastewater for Commercialization

  • Gwon, Byeong-Geun;Kim, Joong-Kyun
    • Environmental Engineering Research
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    • v.17 no.1
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    • pp.3-8
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    • 2012
  • A scaled-up bioconversion of fishmeal wastewater (FMW) into liquid fertilizer was performed five times in a $1m^3$ reactor in order to examine the feasibility of commercialization. The importance of aeration was marked. Analyses indicated that dissolved oxygen (DO) level was closely related to the value of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and it was crucial to achieve high-quality liquid fertilizer. When pure oxygen was supplied through four diffusers into the reactor, DO levels and ORP values were maintained over 1.2 mg/L and 0.2 mV, respectively all the time during 52 hr of bioconversion. The pH changed from 6.8 to 5.9. The average removal percentages of chemical oxygen demand ($COD_{Cr}$) and total nitrogen (TN) were 75.0% and 71.6%, respectively. Compared to the result acquired in a 5-L reactor, bioconversion of FMW into liquid fertilizer was achieved in a shorter time under the same removal percentages of $COD_{Cr}$ and TN. The 52-hr culture of inoculated FMW was phytotoxic-free and it possessed comparable fertilizing ability to a liquid fertilizer made from the fish waste in hydroponic culture with amino acid contents of 5.93 g/ 100 g sample. From all the above results, transferring lab-scale data to large-scale production appeared to be successful. As a result, the commercialization of a liquid fertilizer made from FMW was feasible.