• Title, Summary, Keyword: Ferulic Acid Esterase

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Partial Characterization and Induction of Ferulic Acid Esterase and Xylanase from Pseudomonas sp. LG2 (Pseudomonas sp. LG2의 Ferulic acid esterase 및 Xylanase 유도와 부분적 특성)

  • Kim, Yong-Gyun;Lee, Sang-Mong;Park, Hyun-Chul;Kim, Keun-Ki;Son, Hong-Joo
    • Journal of Life Science
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    • v.17 no.4
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    • pp.568-574
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    • 2007
  • Lignin degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. LG2 was able to degrade lignin substrate to a lot of APPL compound. APPL compound was detected in culture supernatants from Pseudomonas sp. LG2 grown with BSC(brewer's spent grain). FAE(ferulic acid esterase) and xylanase are induced from Pseudomonas sp. LG2 in the presence of carbon sources such as oat spelt xylan, HBSG I, II(hydrolyzed brewer's spent grain I, II) and AFBSG(autoclaved fraction from brewer's spent grain). However, xylanase and FAE are not induced by growth of Pseudomonas sp. LG2 on xylose and arabinose. Pseudomonas sp. LG2 is grown on medium containing oat spelt xylan, HBSG I, II and AFBSG and the induction of FAE and xylanase activities of extracellular proteins determined during 14 days. Maximum level of xylanase activity(5.3 U/mg) found at 6 days in culture contained oat spelt xylan as carbon source, whereas maximum level of FAE activity(15.4 mU/mg) was found at 8 days in culture contained AFBSG as carbon source. Most ferulic acid was released in culture supernatants when Pseudomonas sp. LG2 grown on oat spelt xylan, HBSG I, II and AFBSG. FAE of extracellular enzymes was also specific activity on methyl ferulic acid, methyl caffeic acid and methyl p-coumaric acid respectively, but not methyl sinapinic acid, methyl vanillic acid and methyl gallic acid.

Effect of Glucose Levels and N Sources in Defined Media on Fibrolytic Activity Profiles of Neocallimastix sp. YQ1 Grown on Chinese Wildrye Grass Hay or Alfalfa Hay

  • Yang, H.J.;Yue, Q.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.379-385
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    • 2011
  • Ferulic acid esterase (FAE) and acetyl esterase (AE) cleave feruloyl groups substituted at the 5'-OH group of arabinosyl residues and acetyl groups substituted at O-2/O-3 of the xylan backbone, respectively, of arabinoxylans in the cell wall of grasses. In this study, the enzyme profiles of FAE, AE and polysaccharide hydrolases of the anaerobic rumen fungus Neocallimastix sp. YQ1 grown on Chinese wildrye grass hay (CW) or alfalfa hay (AH) were investigated by two $2{\times}4$ factorial experiments, each in 10-day pure cultures. The treatments consisted of two glucose levels ($G^+$: glucose at 1.0 g/L, $G^-$: no glucose) and four N sources (N1: 1.0 g/L yeast extract, 1.0 g/L tryptone and 0.5 g/L $(NH_4)_2SO_4$; N2: 2.8 g/L yeast extract and 0.5 g/L $(NH_4)_2SO_4$; N3: 1.6 g/L tryptone and 0.5 g/L $(NH_4)_2SO_4$; N4: 1.4 g/L tryptone and 1.7 g/L yeast extract) in defined media. The optimal combinations of glucose level and N source for the fungus on CW, instead of AH, were $G^-N4$ and $G^-N3$ for maximum production of FAE and AE, respectively. Xylanase activity peaked on day 4 and day 6 for the fungus grown on CW and AH, respectively. The activities of esterases were positively correlated with those of xylanase and carboxymethyl cellulase. The fungus grown on CW exhibited a greater volatile fatty acid production than on AH with a greater release of ferulic acid from plant cell wall.

Parametric Optimization of Feruloyl Esterase Production from Aspergillus terreus Strain GA2 Isolated from Tropical Agro-Ecosystems Cultivating Sweet Sorghum

  • Kumar, C. Ganesh;Kamle, Avijeet;Mongolla, Poornima;Joseph, Joveeta
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.21 no.9
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    • pp.947-953
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    • 2011
  • A fungal strain, Aspergillus terreus strain GA2, isolated from an agricultural field cultivating sweet sorghum, produced feruloyl esterase using maize bran. In order to obtain maximum yields of feruloyl esterase, the solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions for enzyme production were standardized. Effective feruloyl esterase production was observed with maize bran as substrate followed by wheat bran, coconut husk, and rice husk among the tested agro-waste crop residues. Optimum particle size of 0.71-0.3 mm and moisture content of 80% favored enzyme production. Moreover, optimum feruloyl esterase production was observed at pH 6.0 and a temperature of $30^{\circ}C$. Supplementation of potato starch (0.6%) as the carbon source and casein (1%) as the nitrogen source favored enzyme production. Furthermore, the culture produced the enzyme after 7 days of incubation when the C:N ratio was 5. Optimization of the SSF conditions revealed that maximum enzyme activity (1,162 U/gds) was observed after 7 days in a production medium of 80% moisture content and pH 6.0 containing 16 g maize bran [25% (w/v)] of particle size of 0.71-0.3 mm, 0.6% potato starch, 3.0% casein, and 64 ml of formulated basal salt solution. Overall, the enzyme production was enhanced by 3.2-fold as compared with un-optimized conditions.

Rumen Microbes, Enzymes and Feed Digestion-A Review

  • Wang, Y.;McAllister, T.A.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.15 no.11
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    • pp.1659-1676
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    • 2002
  • Ruminant animals develop a diverse and sophisticated microbial ecosystem for digesting fibrous feedstuffs. Plant cell walls are complex and their structures are not fully understood, but it is generally believed that the chemical properties of some plant cell wall compounds and the cross-linked three-dimensional matrix of polysaccharides, lignin and phenolic compounds limit digestion of cell wall polysaccharides by ruminal microbes. Three adaptive strategies have been identified in the ruminal ecosystem for degrading plant cell walls: production of the full slate of enzymes required to cleave the numerous bonds within cell walls; attachment and colonization of feed particles; and synergetic interactions among ruminal species. Nonetheless, digestion of fibrous feeds remains incomplete, and numerous research attempts have been made to increase this extent of digestion. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) have been used successfully in monogastric animal production for some time. The possibility of adapting EFE as feed additives for ruminants is under intensive study. To date, animal responses to EFE supplements have varied greatly due to differences in enzyme source, application method, and types of diets and livestock. Currently available information suggests delivery of EFE by applying them to feed offers the best chance to increase ruminal digestion. The general tendency of EFE to increase rate, but not extent, of fibre digestion indicates that the products currently on the market for ruminants may not be introducing novel enzyme activities into the rumen. Recent research suggests that cleavage of esterified linkages (e.g., acetylesterase, ferulic acid esterase) within the plant cell wall matrix may be the key to increasing the extent of cell wall digestion in the rumen. Thus, a crucial ingredient in an effective enzyme additive for ruminants may be an as yet undetermined esterase that may not be included, quantified or listed in the majority of available enzyme preparations. Identifying these pivotal enzyme(s) and using biotechnology to enhance their production is necessary for long term improvements in feed digestion using EFE. Pretreating fibrous feeds with alkali in addition to EFE also shows promise for improving the efficacy of enzyme supplements.