• Title, Summary, Keyword: Cross-cultural

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Lost in Cultural Studies: Searching for an Exit in Drama/Theatre/Performance Studies (문화연구에서 길을 잃다: 한 드라마 연구자의 출구 찾기)

  • Choi, Sung Hee
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.21
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    • pp.189-211
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    • 2010
  • The purpose of this paper is to 1)examine the current state of cultural studies in Korea with a focus on recent discourses about its 'crisis' and 2)attempt to find some ways out of these dilemmas in drama/theatre/performance studies. As Raymond Williams redefined 'culture' as 'a whole way of life,' performance studies has expanded the boundary of 'performance' from traditional performing arts onto almost everything that can be studied and analyzed 'as' performance. Performance is not only the final product on display but a whole process that includes training, workshop, and rehearsal of culture. According to Richard Schechner, workshop and rehearsal are the most critical and creative 'liminal' phases that allow traditional knowledge and alternative challenges to coexist in conflict and intentionally delay the final decision by putting itself in a perpetual process. From this view, this essay attempts to find an-no matter how limited and temporary-answer to or a possible exit from political and theoretical aporias of cultural studies.

Socio-Cultural Environment as a Context and Its Effect on Discourse in Translation

  • Khoutyz, Irina
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.24
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    • pp.84-98
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    • 2011
  • This paper aims to analyze the influences of the socio-cultural environment on discourse in translation. To illustrate a deep connection between discourses and societies in which they were produced, communicative patterns of high- and low-context cultures are examined. Though the original version of the translated text comes from a different culture, the translation reflects communicative preferences of the target culture. To uncover some of these preferences, a comparative study of two translations from Russian into English and from English into Russian is conducted. This study, together with further investigation of some more recent translations into Russian, revealed a number of choices affected by translators' cultural background (for example, making the translation more emotionally charged) and current ideological preferences in the society (excessive use of anglicisms).

A Cross Cultural Study Regarding Motivations for Visiting Ethnic Restaurants

  • Jang, Seo-Yeon;Chernbumroong, Sainatee;Kim, Yeong-Gug
    • Asia-Pacific Journal of Business
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    • v.10 no.1
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    • pp.13-23
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    • 2019
  • Asian food and the Asian restaurant market have grown rapidly in the international market. It has become one of the major trends in the restaurant industry in the world. However, there has been little attempt to develop a scale for measuring customer's motivation to experience Asian restaurants, and cross-cultural approaches are very rare. From this point of view, this study examined an instrument to measure motivation to visit Asian restaurants developed by Jang and Kim (2015), which was originally developed based on UK customers, by applying the population from another cultural background, Thailand. A total of 308 valid responses were obtained in Thailand. CFA was performed with a Thai sample to test internal and external consistency of the scale with another population, and a comparison was made between UK and Thai customers.

Okakura Kakuzō's Art History: Cross-Cultural Encounters, Hegelian Dialectics and Darwinian Evolution

  • Racel, Masako N.
    • Asian review of World Histories
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.17-45
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    • 2014
  • Okakura Kakuz$\bar{o}$ (1863-1913), the founder of the Japan Art Institute, is best known for his proclamation, "Asia is One." This phrase in his book, The Ideals of the East, and his connections to Bengali revolutionaries resulted in Okakura being remembered as one of Japan's foremost Pan-Asianists. He did not, however, write The Ideals of the East as political propaganda to justify Japanese aggression; he wrote it for Westerners as an exposition of Japan's aesthetic heritage. In fact, he devoted much of his life to the preservation and promotion of Japan's artistic heritage, giving lectures to both Japanese and Western audiences. This did not necessarily mean that he rejected Western philosophy and theories. A close examination of his views of both Eastern and Western art and history reveals that he was greatly influenced by Hegel's notion of dialectics and the evolutionary theories proposed by Darwin and Spencer. Okakura viewed cross-cultural encounters to be a catalyst for change and saw his own time as a critical point where Eastern and Western history was colliding, causing the evolution of both artistic cultures.

A Corpus-based Analysis of EFL Learners' Use of Discourse Markers in Cross-cultural Communication

  • Min, Sujung
    • English Language & Literature Teaching
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.177-194
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    • 2011
  • This study examines the use of discourse markers in cross-cultural communication between EFL learners in an e-learning environment. The study analyzes the use of discourse markers in a corpus of an interactive web with a bulletin board system through which college students of English at Japanese and Korean universities interacted with each other discussing the topics of local and global issues. It compares the use of discourse markers in the learners' corpus to that of a native English speakers' corpus. The results indicate that discourse markers are useful interactional devices to structure and organize discourse. EFL learners are found to display more frequent use of referentially and cognitively functional discourse markers and a relatively rare use of other markers. Native speakers are found to use a wider variety of discourse markers for different functions. Suggestions are made for using computer corpora in understanding EFL learners' language difficulties and helping them become more interactionally competent speakers.

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Cross-Cultural Comparison of Sound Sensation and Its Prediction Models for Korean Traditional Silk Fabrics

  • Yi, Eun-Jou
    • Fibers and Polymers
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    • v.6 no.3
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    • pp.269-276
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    • 2005
  • In this study, cross-cultural comparison of sound sensation for Korean traditional silk fabrics between Korea and America was performed and prediction models for sound sensation by objective measurements including sound parameters such as level pressure of total sound (LPT), Zwicker's psychoacoustic characteristics, and mechanical properties by Kawabata Evaluation System were established for each nation to explore the objective parameters explaining sound sensation of the Korean traditional silk. As results, Koreans felt the silk fabric sounds soft and smooth while Americans were revealed as perceiving them hard and rough. Both Koreans and Americans were pleasant with sounds of Gongdan and Newttong and especially Newttong was preferred more by Americans in terms of sound sensation. In prediction models, some of subjective sensation were found as being related mainly with mechanical properties of traditional silk fabrics such as surface and compressional characteristics.

The cultural value effects on social media eWOM in the hospitality industry -A cross cultural study of comparison among China, Korea, and the USA- (환대산업에서 문화적 가치의 Social Media를 통한 Electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)에 대한 영향 -중국, 한국, 미국 간의 문화 비교 연구-)

  • Kang, Sun-Goo;Oh, Chang-Ho
    • Management & Information Systems Review
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    • v.34 no.1
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    • pp.191-209
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    • 2015
  • Electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) in social media has been recognized as one of the most influential marketing tools across various businesses. Understanding eWOM in social media is critical to reach potential global consumers easily and quickly in the hospitality industry. However, few empirical studies in hospitality attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of eWOM in social media from a global perspective. Given the competitive climate of the hospitality market, it is meaningful for hospitality marketers to evaluate the effectiveness of eWOM in social media and the influence of cultural factors to promote customers and increase profitability globally. The main purpose of this study was to examine the influence of cultural values on social media eWOM in the hospitality industry in China, Korea, and the USA. The result of this study indicates Chinese and American people engage more than Korean people when they try to purchase hospitality product and service This study particularly provided a cross-cultural study of comparison among these countries and the findings of this study are expected to provide important practical assistance for global marketing strategies in social media.

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