• Title/Summary/Keyword: Copenhagen psychosocial questionnaire

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The Third Version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire

  • Burr, Hermann;Berthelsen, Hanne;Moncada, Salvador;Nubling, Matthias;Dupret, Emilie;Demiral, Yucel;Oudyk, John;Kristensen, Tage S.;Llorens, Clara;Navarro, Albert;Lincke, Hans-Joachim;Bocerean, Christine;Sahan, Ceyda;Smith, Peter;Pohrt, Anne
    • Safety and Health at Work
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.482-503
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    • 2019
  • Introduction: A new third version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ III) has been developed in response to trends in working life, theoretical concepts, and international experience. A key component of the COPSOQ III is a defined set of mandatory core items to be included in national short, middle, and long versions of the questionnaire. The aim of the present article is to present and test the reliability of the new international middle version of the COPSOQ III. Methods: The questionnaire was tested among 23,361 employees during 2016-2017 in Canada, Spain, France, Germany, Sweden, and Turkey. A total of 26 dimensions (measured through scales or single items) of the middle version and two from the long version were tested. Psychometric properties of the dimensions were assessed regarding reliability (Cronbach α), ceiling and floor effects (fractions with extreme answers), and distinctiveness (correlations with other dimensions). Results: Most international middle dimensions had satisfactory reliability in most countries, though some ceiling and floor effects were present. Dimensions with missing values were rare. Most dimensions had low to medium intercorrelations. Conclusions: The COPSOQ III offers reliable and distinct measures of a wide range of psychosocial dimensions of modern working life in different countries; although a few measures could be improved. Future testing should focus on validation of the COPSOQ items and dimensions using both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Such investigations would enhance the basis for recommendations using the COPSOQ III.

Reliability and Validity of the Korean Version of the Copenhagen Psyco-social Questionnaire Scale (한국어판 코펜하겐 사회심리적 업무환경 측정도구의 타당도와 신뢰도)

  • June, Kyung Ja;Choi, Eun Suk
    • Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing
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    • v.22 no.1
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    • pp.1-12
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    • 2013
  • Purpose: This study aims to test the validity and criteria-related reliability of the Korean version of the Copenhagen Psyco-social Questionnaire version II (COPSOQ-K) assessing the psychosocial working environment. Methods: The COPSOQ-K was developed through forward-backward translation techniques, and revision based on feedback from focus groups. Survey data were collected from 311 office workers who worked in one workplace. An internal consistency reliability was estimated by Cronbach's ${\alpha}$. The impacts of the COPSOQ-K scales on job satisfaction, self-rated health, stress, sleeping troubles, burnout, and sickness absence were analyzed with multiple regression model or multiple logistic regression model, adjusted age and gender using SAS version 9.3. The Pearson correlation coefficients between the COPSOQ-K scales and Korean job stress and its subdomain were identified. Results: Cronbach's ${\alpha}$ of COPSOQ-K scales was adequate or good (0.66~0.87). The major COPSOQ-K scales predict job satisfaction, self-rated health, stress, sleeping troubles burnout, and sickness absence. The major COPSOQ-K scales were correlated with Korean job stress and its subdomain. Conclusion: The COPSOQ-K scales have satisfactory reliability and criteria-related validity. The COPSOQ-K scales will be useful for the future studies and practices associated with psychosocial working environment.

Effects of Psychosocial Work Environment on Stress, Depression, Sleep Disorder, and Burnout of General Hospital Nurses (일개 종합병원 간호사의 스트레스, 우울, 수면장애, 소진에 대한 사회심리적 업무환경의 효과)

  • Lee, Yangsun;Choi, Eunsuk
    • Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing
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    • v.24 no.2
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    • pp.114-121
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the psychosocial work environment of hospital nurses to identify influences of psychosocial work environment on stress, depression, sleep disorder, and burnout. Methods: A total of 219 nurses working in one hospital were surveyed by using the Korean version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ-K) mental health and psychosocial work environment. The impact of the psychosocial work environment on mental health was analyzed using multiple regression. Results: Mental health variables are correlated with each other. The psychosocial work environment variables and mental health variables are mostly correlated. To assess the psychosocial work environment that affects mental health the most, multiple regression was used. Work-family conflict was the most powerful explanation of all the mental health variables. Work pace, social community at work, mutual trust among employees, predictability, and influence were found to be affecting some mental health variables. Conclusion: To improve the mental health of nurses, it is necessary to consider work pace, social community at work, mutual trust among employees, predictability, influence focus on work-family conflict.

The Impacts of Psychosocial Work Conditions on Self-rated Health among Korean Workers (한국 근로자의 심리·사회적 근로환경이 주관적 건강에 미치는 영향)

  • Choi, Eunsuk;Jeon, Gyeong-Suk
    • Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing
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    • v.25 no.4
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    • pp.300-310
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    • 2016
  • Purpose: Few studies have considered the psychosocial work environment factors in relation to employee health. This study explored the relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and self-rated health among Korean employees. Methods: The study population of 21,476 employees was derived from the 2014 Korean Work Environment Survey (KWES). Psychosocial work environment was measured by Copenhagen psychosocial questionnaire scales. Results: Among employees at workplaces (n=21,476), 23.3% rated their health as poor. Among 12 indicators of psychosocial work environment characteristics, 'higher emotional demand', 'demands for hiding emotions', 'work-family conflict', and 'social community at work' were independently associated with risk of poor self-rated health of Korean employees after adjustment of all sociodemographics, work condition characteristics and physical work environment exposure. In addition, higher 'possibilities for development' and 'social support from supervisor' were more likely to decrease the risk of poor health. Conclusion: We suggest that psychosocial work environment is an important determinant of employees' health. The study results provide a good starting point for developing intervention and strategies for health improvement.

Developing a Basic Scale for Workers' Psychological Burden from the Perspective of Occupational Safety and Health

  • Kim, Kyung Woo;Lim, Ho Chan;Park, Jae Hee;Park, Sang Gyu;Park, Ye Jin;Cho, Hm Hak
    • Safety and Health at Work
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.224-231
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    • 2018
  • Background: Organizations are pursing complex and diverse aims to generate higher profits. Many workers experience high work intensity such as workload and work pressure in this organizational environment. Especially, psychological burden is a commonly used term in workplace of Republic of Korea. This study focused on defining the psychological burden from the perspective of occupational safety and health and tried to develop a scale for psychological burden. Methods: The 48 preliminary questionnaire items for psychological burden were prepared by a focus group interview with 16 workers through the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II and Mindful Awareness Attention Scale. The preliminary items were surveyed with 572 workers, and exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and correlation analysis were conducted for a new scale. Results: As a result of the exploratory factor analysis, five factors were extracted: organizational activity, human error, safety and health workload, work attitude, and negative self-management. These factors had significant correlations and reliability, and the stability of the model for validity was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis. Conclusion: The developed scale for psychological burden can measure workers' psychological burden in relation to safety and health. Despite some limitations, this study has applicability in the workplace, given the relatively small-sized questionnaire.