• Title, Summary, Keyword: Condensed Tannins

Search Result 52, Processing Time 0.097 seconds

Inhibitory Effects of Tannins on Tyrosinase Activity (탄닌화합물의 Tyrosinase 억제 활성)

  • Cho, Su-Min;Kim, Jee-Hun;Lee, Min-Won
    • Korean Journal of Pharmacognosy
    • /
    • v.32 no.1
    • /
    • pp.68-71
    • /
    • 2001
  • For the use of tannins in the whitening-effect cosmetics, inhibitory effect against tyrosinase activity was determined. Three condensed tannins including gallocatechin, gallocatechin 3',4'-di-O-gallate and epicatechin 3-O-gallate and three hydrolyzable tannins, 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-${\beta}$-D-glucose, 2,3-(S)-HHDP-D-glucose and pedunculagin showed 15-29% mild inhibitory effects against tyrosinase activity.

  • PDF

Effect of Condensed Tannins Prepared from Banana (Musa Sapientum L.) fruit on Digestive Enzyme In vitro (바나나 과실 함유탄닌이 소화효소 작용에 미치는 영향)

  • Chung, Chung-Han;Ryu, Chung-Ho;Cho, Young-Su
    • Applied Biological Chemistry
    • /
    • v.39 no.6
    • /
    • pp.477-481
    • /
    • 1996
  • It has been shown that tannins have adverse effects on growth of animals and feed utilization. Tannins are usually classified into hydrolyzable and condensed types but the adverse effects are more marked in condensed tannin in hydrolyzable tannin. Furthermore, the principle condensed tannins found in banana fruits are pro types by the polymerization of flavan-3, 4-diols either alone or in combination with other flavonoids such as catechins. Tannin of the investigated banana(Banana; Musa sapientum LINN)fruits was fractionated into four or five molecular forms, according to the degree of polymerization by chromatography on a column of Sephadex LH-20. The protein-precitating capacity of the fraction noted tannins increased in degree polymerzation. The inhibitory effect of tannins on trypsin(EC 3. 4. 21. 4), ${\alpha}-amylase$(EC 3. 2. 1. 1) and lipase(EC 3. 1. 1. 3) activities in vitro also increased with the incraesed in degree of polymerization.

  • PDF

Antioxidative Activity of Tannins from Rubus coreanum (복분자딸기에서 분리한 탄닌화합물의 항산화작용)

  • 김광호;이연아;김준식;이도익;최영욱;김하형;이민원
    • YAKHAK HOEJI
    • /
    • v.44 no.4
    • /
    • pp.354-357
    • /
    • 2000
  • Two ellagitannins, pedunculagin and 2,3-(S)-Hexahydroxydiphenoyl (HHDP)-D -glucose and three condensed tannins, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and procyanidin B-4 which were isolated from Rubus coreanum were evaluated for their antioxidative effects with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and lipid peroxidation generation system mediated by addition of $H_2O$$_2$to rat liver homogenate (TBARS). The ellagitannins, 2,3-(S)-HHDP-D-glucose and pedunculagin, showed more potent antioxidative activities by DPPH and TBARS than condensed tannins.

  • PDF

Inhibitory Effect of Condensed Tannins Isolated from Korean Green Tea against Xanthine Oxidase (한국산 녹차로부터 분리한 축합형 탄닌의 Xanthine Oxidase 저해효과)

  • Cho, Young-Je;Chun, Sung-Sook;Choi, Cheong
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
    • /
    • v.22 no.4
    • /
    • pp.418-422
    • /
    • 1993
  • For the purpose of utilizing tannins in the functional foods and crude drugs the xanthine oxidase inhibition of tannins isolated from Korean green tea was determined. Acetone extract from Korean green tea showed inhibitory effect against the xanthine oxidase. The galloyl tannins showed higher inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase than the nongalloyl tannins. In terms of stereo isomers, (-)-epicatechins had higher inhibitory activity than the (+)-catechins. The synergistic activity was also observed. Tannins isolated from Korean green tea appeared to be incompetitive inhibitor against the xanthine oxidase.

  • PDF

Influence of Condensed Tannins from Ficus bengalensis Leaves on Feed Utilization, Milk Production and Antioxidant Status of Crossbred Cows

  • Dey, Avijit;De, Partha Sarathi
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.27 no.3
    • /
    • pp.342-348
    • /
    • 2014
  • This study was conducted to examine the effects of condensed tannins (CT) from Ficus bengalensis leaves on the feed utilization, milk production and health status of crossbred cows. Eighteen crossbred dairy cows at their second and mid lactation (avg. BW $351.6{\pm}10.6$ kg) were randomly divided into two groups of nine each in a completely randomized block design and fed two iso-nitrogenous supplements formulated to contain 0% and 1.5% CT through dried and ground leaves of Ficus bengalensis. The diets were designated as CON and FBLM, respectively and fed to cows with a basal diet of rice straw to meet requirements for maintenance and milk production. The daily milk yield was significantly (p<0.05) increased due to supplementation of FBLM diet. The 4% fat corrected milk yield was also significantly (p<0.01) higher due to increased (p<0.05) milk fat in cows under diet FBLM as compared to CON. The inclusion of CT at 1.5% in the supplement did not interfere with the feed intake or digestibility of DM, OM, CP, EE, NDF, and ADF by lactating cows. Digestible crude protein (DCP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN) values of the composite diets were comparable between the groups. The blood biochemical parameters remained unaltered except significantly (p<0.05) lowered serum urea concentration in cows fed FBLM diet. There was a significant (p<0.05) increase intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in cows supplemented with condensed tannins. The total thiol group (T-SH) was found to be higher with reduction in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in cows of FBLM group. The cost of feeding per kg milk production was also reduced due to supplementation of Ficus bengalensis leaves. Therefore, a perceptible positive impact was evident on milk production and antioxidant status in crossbred cows during mid-lactation given supplement containing 1.5% CT through Ficus bengalensis leaves.

Seasonal Variations in Tannin Profile of Tree Leaves

  • Rana, K.K.;Wadhwa, M.;Bakshi, M.P.S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.19 no.8
    • /
    • pp.1134-1138
    • /
    • 2006
  • Forest tree leaves (12 different species) of semi hilly arid region of Punjab State were collected at 30-day interval throughout the year to assess the seasonal variations in tannin profile. Tannins were extracted and fractionated from fat free samples and data were analyzed statistically by $12{\times}12$ factorial design. The leaves of Anogeissus latifolia had the highest (p<0.05) concentration of total phenols (17.4%), net (15.9%) and hydrolysable (16.9%) tannins, followed by leaves of Acacia nilotica. Majority of the tree leaves selected had moderate levels (2-5%) of net tannins. Leaves of Carrisa had the highest (p<0.05) concentration of condensed tannins (CT), whereas the leaves of Anogeissus had the lowest (p<0.05) concentration of condensed tannins. The protein precipitable phenols (PPP) corresponded well with the net tannin content present in different tree leaves. Seasonal variation data revealed that in summer, net tannins and PPP decline in leaves of Bauhinia and Zizyphus whereas the net tannin content of Anogeissus and that of Carrisa increased during summer. The CT and PPP content in the leaves of Pheonix, Leucaena, Zizyphus and Ougenia increased in winter till spring season. Tree leaves generally had higher concentration of HT during summer months. It was concluded that leaves of leaves of A. nilotica, A. latifolia and L. leucocephala could serve as an excellent alternate feed stuffs for ruminants. However, leaves of Phoenix, Carrisa, Bauhinia and Dodonea should be avoided.

Inhibition Effect against Tyrosinase of Condensed Tannins from Korean Green Tea (한국산 녹차로부터 분리한 축합형 탄닌의 tyrosinase 저해효과)

  • Kim, Jin-Ku;Cha, Woen-Seup;Park, Joon-Hee;Oh, Sang-Lyong;Cho, Young-Je;Chun, Sung-Sook;Choi, Cheong
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
    • /
    • v.29 no.1
    • /
    • pp.173-177
    • /
    • 1997
  • For the utilizing of tannins in the functional foods and natural inhibitor against browning reaction by tyrosinase in foods, inhibition effect against tyrosinase of tannins from Korean green tea was determined. Acetone extract from Korean green tea showed inhibition effect against tyrosinase. The gallocatechin compounds showed higher inhibition effect than the catechin compounds. In terms of stereo isomers, (-)-epicatechin compounds had higher inhibition effect than the (+)-catechin compounds. The monomer had higher inhibition effect than the dimer.

  • PDF

목재산업 작업장의 부유분진에 관한 연구

  • 이내우;이병선
    • Proceedings of the Korean Institute of Industrial Safety Conference
    • /
    • /
    • pp.89-92
    • /
    • 1998
  • Tannins are complex polyphenolic substances present in plants. They may be classified as either hydrolysable or condensed tannins, and extracts of the latter type have displayed carcinogenic properties in animal studies (Hausen, 1981). The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that exposure to airborne wood dust, especially hardwood dust during furniture manufacture, is a cause of sino-nasal cancer, notably nasal adenocarcinoma. (omitted)

  • PDF

Manipulation of Cassava Cultivation and Utilization to Improve Protein to Energy Biomass for Livestock Feeding in the Tropics

  • Wanapat, M.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.16 no.3
    • /
    • pp.463-472
    • /
    • 2003
  • Cassava (Manihot esculenta, Crantz), an annual tropical tuber crop, was nutritionally evaluated as a foliage for ruminants, especially dairy cattle. Cultivation of cassava biomass to produce hay is based on a first harvest of the foliage at three months after planting, followed every two months thereafter until one year. Inter-cropping of leguminous fodder as food-feed between rows of cassava, such as Leucaena leucocephala or cowpea (Vigna unculata), enriches soil fertility and provides additional fodder. Cassava hay contained 20 to 25% crude protein in the dry matter with good profile of amino acids. Feeding trials with cattle revealed high levels of DM intake (3.2% of BW) and high DM digestibility (71%). The hay contains tannin-protein complexes which could act as rumen by - pass protein for digestion in the small intestine. As cassava hay contains condensed tannins, it could have subsequent impact on changing rumen ecology particularly changing rumen microbes population. Therefore, supplementation with cassava hay at 1-2 kg/hd/d to dairy cattle could markedly reduce concentrate requirements, and increase milk yield and composition. Moreover, cassava hay supplementation in dairy cattle could increase milk thiocyanate which could possibly enhance milk quality and milk storage, especially in small holder-dairy farming. Condensed tannins contained in cassava hay have also been shown to potentially reduce gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants and therefore could act as an anthelmintic agent. Cassava hay is therefore an excellent multi-nutrient source for animals, especially for dairy cattle during the long dry season, and has the potential to increase the productivity and profitability of sustainable livestock production systems in the tropics.

Molecular Weight, Protein Binding Affinity and Methane Mitigation of Condensed Tannins from Mangosteen-peel (Garcinia mangostana L)

  • Paengkoum, P.;Phonmun, T.;Liang, J.B.;Huang, X.D.;Tan, H.Y.;Jahromi, M.F.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.28 no.10
    • /
    • pp.1442-1448
    • /
    • 2015
  • The objectives of this study were to determine the molecular weight of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) peel, its protein binding affinity and effects on fermentation parameters including total gas, methane ($CH_4$) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. The average molecular weight ($M_w$) of the purified CT was 2,081 Da with a protein binding affinity of 0.69 (the amount needed to bind half the maximum bovine serum albumin). In vitro gas production declined by 0.409, 0.121, and 0.311, respectively, while CH4 production decreased by 0.211, 0.353, and 0.549, respectively, with addition of 10, 20, and 30 mg CT/500 mg dry matter (DM) compared to the control (p<0.05). The effects of CT from mangosteen-peel on in vitro DM degradability (IVDMD) and in vitro N degradability was negative and linear (p<0.01). Total VFA, concentrations of acetic, propionic, butyric and isovaleric acids decreased linearly with increasing amount of CT. The aforementioned results show that protein binding affinity of CT from mangosteen-peel is lower than those reported for Leucaena forages, however, the former has stronger negative effect on IVDMD. Therefore, the use of mangosteen-peel as protein source and $CH_4$ mitigating agent in ruminant feed requires further investigations.