• Title, Summary, Keyword: Chinese Zodiac

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Animal Symbolism of the Trademarks and Trade Characters - Cultural influences of the animal symbols

  • Kim Hyun-Jee
    • Archives of design research
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.71-92
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    • 2006
  • People have their own cultural backgrounds and experiences in terms of visual perceptional thinking so that they could misunderstand the cultural symbols, trademarks, Brand Identities, and trade characters, especially, animal trademarks. Sometimes Easterners and Westerners seem to not comprehend the different meanings of the cultural symbols. The signs of twelve Chinese zodiac animals are the typical symbol of the Asian mythology. What I wanted to focus on emphasizing the different views and perspective of an animal trademark is according to the Chinese Zodiac between Eastern and Western cultures. Generally, multiple symbolisms are difficult to comprehend, because they are created by individual ideas and incorporate several mythologies and histories. How do Westerners interpret the implied meaning of Eastern animals in general? How are they going to understand the Eastern animal logos or marks accurately? How can we solve the problem to make people understand their different meanings? There were some confusing pictorial images in the area of the design field when a designer creates an animal mark for globalization and localization. Creating of hybrid symbol is the best way to break the communication barriers with people all around the world.

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Study on Folklore Consciousness of Twelve Chinese Zodiac Animals Shown in Folk Painting (민화에 나타난 십이지동물의 민속의식에 관한 연구)

  • Lee, Jong kawn
    • Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society
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    • v.17 no.6
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    • pp.347-359
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    • 2016
  • People are destined to live according to the time and fate after they are born. Man is connected with the idea that is called the Chinese zodiac sign related to one out of 12 animals, regardless of one's thought. This paper was written with the expectation that it will be a new turning point understanding the mutual influence and its changing process by catching the ethnic belief and emotion as well as its cultural background in the Asian Zone by investigating the meaning of the 12 Chinese zodiac shown in the folk painting from the viewpoint of folk lore including "Chinese zodiac sign" culture rooted in our daily lives. The animal 'Rat' has been lived well human beings accompanied by the fable or the nature, while the animal 'Ox' has been living together with human history. The 'Tiger' has been considered the 'Power retreating disease or a devil' to humans, which is the most frightening but near at hand. The 'Rabbit' in the fable is inculcating hope and ideals to humans. The imaginary 'Dragon' is rooted in the deep national belief, which is seated as 'Guardian god' of farming culture and mankind, while the 'Snake' is playing a role in protecting humans as the 'Sea God' in Tsushima and Jeju Island, and has been believed and followed in the deep mind of humans. The 'Horse' in the nomad culture has been adorned as the basic creature of nomadic society in the character of a psychic medium between the human and god or their 'Guardian god'. The ancient Japanese regarded 'Monkey' as holy, being connected with treasure. It infers a human's desire to borrow wisdom from 'Monkey'. 'Chicken' includes the meaning of a lucky sign connecting the sky and the human world by arranging together with humans. The 'Dog' is believed and followed as performing the function of a messenger connecting this world with the afterlife in the next world tale of shamanism. The 'Pig' also lives well with humans, being interpreted as fecundity. Although the meaning of the 12 Chinese Zodiac animals has ethnic differences, all of them have been shared with humans, rooted in the human mind, being believed, and followed in human lives.

On the Origin and Development of Iconography of the Twelve Zodiac Signs of Royal Tombs of Joseon Dynasty (조선왕릉 십이지신상(十二支神像)의 도상(圖像) 원류와 전개 과정)

  • Kim, Ji Yeon
    • MUNHWAJAE Korean Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies
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    • v.42 no.4
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    • pp.198-221
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    • 2009
  • Royal tombs of Joseon dynasty are the crystallization of history, ideology, culture, art, architecture, and ritual ceremony of Joseon dynasty, all mingled in one. So, they are very significant symbols showing 500 years of dynastic history as a whole. Among various factors comprising a royal tomb, stone figures surrounding grave mound are special factors as a symbol protecting it. Further among them, twelve zodiac images arrayed nearest to the grave mound represent the core of the function. Images of twelve zodiac signs originated from the tombs of the Unified Silla Kingdom are certain to hold important role and position in the construction of royal tombs, judging from huge scale and excellent sculptural art of them. However, both their scale and form had been gradually simplified in Goryeo and Joseon dynasty, thus the importance of them has been underestimated compared to other stone figures Images of twelve zodiac signs were very important factors which decorated royal tombs both as a protective role and as a concept of direction. Their historicity and symbolism cannot be neglected in that they had been transmitted to the royal tombs of Joseon dynasty. In this paper, images of twelve zodiac signs expressed in the royal tombs of Joseon dynasty are classified into 3 forms, and reviewed the origin and development of them for each period. They could be classified into 3 forms ; civil vassals with human body and head, civil vassals with human body and head wearing hat decorated with zodiac animals, Chinese characters of either zodiac signs or either a combination of 10 calendar signs and 8 trigrams. The above 3 forms originated from China and became a favorite motif to decorate the royal tombs from early Joseon period until late Joseon by replacing each other and thus changing along the course of the dynasty. In the meantime, we can see a unique character in the images of twelve zodiac signs of royal tombs of Joseon dynasty. In some cases, 24 directions are expressed in which 10 calender signs and 8 trigrams are composed altogether. Images of twelve zodiac signs in the royal bombs of Joseon dynasty are very significant as evidences by which we can confirm uniqueness and tradition of Korean tomb system transmitted from Unified Silla period.

A Study on the Re-designed Bang-Wee-Shin-Sang to the Korean Tradition (한국 전통 "방위신상(方位神像)"을 재해석한 디자인 작품 연구)

  • Cho, BongSeok;Kim, SunBae
    • Journal of Digital Convergence
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    • v.11 no.4
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    • pp.431-441
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    • 2013
  • The aim of this study is to reinterpret the image on a Korean tradition known as Bang-wee-shin-sang (an image of direction deity), and to revive the image into Jikimee (the guardian). In particular, this research re-analyzed the image and the symbol of Bang-wee-shin-sang and effectively designed the tradition to fit the modern living space. The theoretical study is to explore why it is necessary to redesign Bang-wee-shin-sang to accommodate modern living after examining the background and origin of typical Korean traditions such as Four Deity painting, Chinese Zodiac, and Four Kings' Painting. As a previous study, we examined the procedures of making Jikimee which was based on artists' works that utilized historical artifacts. The study indicated that Bang-wee-shin-sang is a vital resource to disseminate the unique characteristics of Korea and its tradition which played a role in linking the past and the present. Consequently, it is discussed that the utilization of modernized Jikimee in smart environment must be supported by foundation of academic system, the effort of academic and research link, and government funding policy.

Study on the Fancy Relationship of Viscera under the Diao-hou-yong-shen (조후용신(調候用神)을 활용한 월별(月別) 장부간(臟腑間)의 호오관계)

  • Kim, Hyun-Jung;Kim, Yong-Chan;Kim, Byung-Soo;Kang, Jung-Soo
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.22 no.5
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    • pp.1062-1070
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    • 2008
  • The human body and nature respond to each other. The change of nature influences to directly human body. One of the change is the weather change. and there is order in the change. The order is twelve months. To explain the weather change of the cold, hot. dry and wet. we can use Four seasons, The twenty-four seasons, or The twelve month. To explain the five elements of the chinese cosmogony, The four season is useful, and the change of weather, the twenty-four seasons is good. But, the viscera is explained by the ten celestial stems and the twelve horary sings. Thus the twelve horary sings is most useful to explain, because one year is composed by twelve months. The twelve season and fancy of the ten celestial stems is explained fully by Diao-hou-yong-shen. Diao-hou-yong-shen is expressed by the zodiac signs, and explained by the disposition of the zodiac sings. In addition to the oriental medical science is also explained and expressed by the zodiac signs. Therefore, I think that the change of viscera, according to weather, is based on the Diao-hou-yong-shen, and I get some results. In the acting of viscera, there are some relationship between organs. The relationship is not influenced directly by the weather of four seasons, unless there are some special details. If the energy of the month, which rules one specific organ, is weak, doctor should fill up the organ. If not, the organ tends to get sick. According to the full or weak of the five elements which is under the month, the useless or harmful elements should be taken off, and useful and needful elements should be serviced. The balance between cold, hot, dry and wet should be maintained. However, the fancy of the viscera is very different. So, doctor should be careful to maintain balance. The full and weak between Yin and Yang should be considered when doctor think about cold and hot in the month.

Study on Contemporary Applications of Cultural Archetypes : focused on visualization of 'The Golden Pig' in Geuknakjeon of Bulguksa Temple (문화원형의 현대적 변용에 관한 연구: 불국사 극락전 '황금돼지'의 시각화를 중심으로)

  • Lee, Young-suk
    • Journal of Korea Multimedia Society
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.487-494
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    • 2016
  • This study aimed to visualize a pig character targeting the golden pig in Geuknakjeon of Bulguksa Temple. As for a pig, it is included in this list of the 12 Chinese zodiac animals and controls Haeshinjang. Today, the characters market is enjoying rapid growth due to diversification of platforms. However, we do not see many characters made out of Korean traditional cultures and customs. This study first looks into significance of pigs that are often observed in Korean traditional culture and then offers possibilities of their being transformed into contemporary characters. In order to achieve the research goals, the study shed new light on the golden pig in Bulguksa Temple. As making contemporary applications to , the study proceeded with work of visualization. As for a face of a character, the study focused on that of the pig but regarding a body, the study applied a man's body. After all, the study came up with this SD character in a second-proportioned figure. This study discuses formative characteristics of existing Buddhist cultural assets and uses the character for improving understanding on Korean traditional culture. In the future, the study will propose ideas on animation contents development targeting infants and children.

A Study on New Pochonka Published in A.D. 1792 (1792년에 출간된 새로운 보천가(步天歌)에 대한 연구)

  • Ahn, Sang-Hyeon
    • Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences
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    • v.26 no.4
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    • pp.603-620
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    • 2009
  • New Pochonka published in the eighteenth century of the Choson dynasty was composed of star-charts based on the new observations made by Jesuits in China and songs corrected a little bit from previous version of Pochonka. The asterisms in the previous Pochonka are listed in the same order to that in the Song dynasty's literature; while the asterisms in the new Pochonka are listed in accordance with Pu-tien-ko published in China after the Ming dynasty. The Chinese-style twelve-equatorial-section system is adopted in the new Pochonka, while in its song is adopted the zodiac system, which can be seen in the star-charts of previous version of Pochonka. The asterisms belonging to three or four neighboring lunar-mansions are drawn in one chart. Each chart covers asterisms not belonging to a certain range of right ascension, but to a certain lunar mansion. We estimate the forming era of the new Pochonka from the following facts; that the Ling-Tai-I-Hsiang-Chih was used to make charts and footnotes whose archetype can be found in the Chinese literature around A.D. 1700, that these Chinese books were imported into Choson in A.D. 1709, that the naming taboo to the emperor Khang-Hsi was used, that the order of Shen-Hsiu (參宿) was transposed with Tshui-Hsiu (자宿), and that the new Pochonka was substituted for the old version when the rules of Royal Astronomical Bureau was reformed in A.D. 1791. In conclusion, the parent sources of the charts and footnotes of the new Pochonka might be imported from the Ching dynasty around 1709 A.D. to form the new Pochonka between A.D. 1709 and A.D. 1791, and finally to be published in A.D. 1792. We discuss the possible future works to make a firm conclusion.