• Title, Summary, Keyword: Chinese Medicine

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A Study of the Development Model of Chinese Traditional Medicin - Centering on the Process of the Professionalization - (중의학의 발전모형에 대한 연구 -전문화과정을 중심으로-)

  • Lee Hyun Ji
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.611-616
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    • 2003
  • Through the whole period of the twentieth century, Chinese Traditional Medicine has been affected by the political and cultural changes of Chinese society. Before the 1949 Communist Revolution, Chinese Traditional Medicine was regarded as a dark past which should be cleared off. But Chinese Traditional Medicine has been reevaluated as a national medicine and spreaded quickly since the 1949 Communist Revolution. Moreover, 'the bare foot doctor' who received short term training appeared during the Cultural Revolution. It enhanced the status of Chinese Traditional Medicine. At the same time, it was estimated as a model of the self-reliant development of Third World countries. But the direction of development of Chinese Traditional Medicine was changed again recently. Chinese government has adapted the open-economy policy since the late 1970s. Accordingly Chinese Traditional Medicine also has been changed. Nowadays it pursues the professional development strategy. This paper inquired the following research questions. First, what kind of historical changes in the development strategy of Chinese Traditional Medicine has happened? Second, how much Chinese Traditional Medicine has accomplished the professionalization? Third, what kind of problems Chinese Traditional Medicine has met in the process of professionalization? Finally, why Chinese Traditional Medicine has adapted the professional development strategy?

Chemistry Study on Protective Effect against·OH-induced DNA Damage and Antioxidant Mechanism of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis

  • Li, Xican;Fang, Qian;Lin, Jing;Yuan, Zhengpeng;Han, Lu;Gao, Yaoxiang
    • Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society
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    • v.35 no.1
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    • pp.117-122
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    • 2014
  • As a Chinese herbal medicine used in East Asia for thousands years, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (CMO) was observed to possess a protective effect against OH-induced DNA damage in the study. To explore the mechanism, the antioxidant effects and chemical contents of five CMO extracts were determined by various methods. On the basis of mechanistic analysis, and correlation analysis between antioxidant effects & chemical contents, it can be concluded that CMO exhibits a protective effect against OH-induced DNA damage, and the effect can be attributed to the existence of phenolic compounds, especially magnolol and honokiol. They exert the protective effect via antioxidant mechanism which may be mediated via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and/or sequential electron proton transfer (SEPT). In the process, the phenolic-OH moiety in phenylpropanoids is oxidized to the stable quinine-like form and the stability of quinine-like can be ultimately responsible for the antioxidant.

Remarkable impact of steam temperature on ginsenosides transformation from fresh ginseng to red ginseng

  • Xu, Xin-Fang;Gao, Yan;Xu, Shu-Ya;Liu, Huan;Xue, Xue;Zhang, Ying;Zhang, Hui;Liu, Meng-Nan;Xiong, Hui;Lin, Rui-Chao;Li, Xiang-Ri
    • Journal of Ginseng Research
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    • v.42 no.3
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    • pp.277-287
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    • 2018
  • Background: Temperature is an essential condition in red ginseng processing. The pharmacological activities of red ginseng under different steam temperatures are significantly different. Methods: In this study, an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry was developed to distinguish the red ginseng products that were steamed at high and low temperatures. Multivariate statistical analyses such as principal component analysis and supervised orthogonal partial least squared discrimination analysis were used to determine the influential components of the different samples. Results: The results showed that different steamed red ginseng samples can be identified, and the characteristic components were 20-gluco-ginsenoside Rf, ginsenoside Re, ginsenoside Rg1, and malonyl-ginsenoside Rb1 in red ginseng steamed at low temperature. Meanwhile, the characteristic components in red ginseng steamed at high temperature were 20R-ginsenoside Rs3 and ginsenoside Rs4. Polar ginsenosides were abundant in red ginseng steamed at low temperature, whereas higher levels of less polar ginsenosides were detected in red ginseng steamed at high temperature. Conclusion: This study makes the first time that differences between red ginseng steamed under different temperatures and their ginsenosides transformation have been observed systematically at the chemistry level. The results suggested that the identified chemical markers can be used to illustrate the transformation of ginsenosides in red ginseng processing.

Review of International Programs of Chinese Medicine University in China (중국 중의약대학의 외국인 연수프로그램 현황에 대한 고찰연구)

  • Lyu, YeeRan;Lee, Ji-Young;Son, Chang-Gue
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.35 no.3
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    • pp.125-134
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    • 2014
  • Objectives: This study aimed to survey and report on the international programs for Chinese Medicine in China. Methods: Online research was conducted based on a survey of official websites of 25 universities of Chinese medicine. In certain situations, we used e-mail or phone calls to get more detailed information. Results: Among 25 universities of Chinese medicine, 22 operate international programs for Chinese medicine. The main contents of the programs are acupuncture, moxibustion, tuina, Chinese materia medica, cosmetology or qigong, and an average 400 foreign students finish each program yearly. China has maintained the lead in international education of traditional Oriental medicine, and has already established a systematic and remarkable infrastructure for globalization of Chinese medicine. Conclusions: This study can inform the development of strategy in the process of raising the competitiveness of Korean medicine in the world market.

Study on the Anti-hypertension mechanism of Prunella Vulgaris based on entity grammar systems

  • Du, Li;Li, Man-man;Zhang, Bai-Xia;He, Shuai-Bing;Hu, Ya-Nan;Wang, Yun
    • CELLMED
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    • v.5 no.4
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    • pp.27.1-27.6
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    • 2015
  • Literatures and experimental studies have shown that Prunella has an effect on anti-hypertension, however, its components are complicated, so that it is still difficult to clear the specific roles of its various components in blood pressure regulation in. So we decide to systematically study the anti-hypertension mechanism of Prunella. We integrated multiple databases and constructed molecular interaction network between the chemical constituents of Prunella Vulgaris and hypertension based on entity grammar systems model. The network has 262 nodes and 802 edges. Then we infer the interactions between chemical compositions and disease targets to clarify the anti-hypertension mechanism. Finally, we found Prunella could influence hypertension by regulating apoptosis, cell proliferation, blood vessel development and vasoconstriction, etc. Thus this study provides reference for drug development and compatibility, and also gives guidance for health care at a certain extent.

Study of the Professionalization of Education for Traditional Chinese Medicine (중의학 교육의 전문화에 대한 연구)

  • Kwon, Young-Kyu;Lee, Hyun-Ji
    • Journal of Physiology & Pathology in Korean Medicine
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.860-864
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    • 2005
  • Nowadays most of scholarship is based on the western model. Traditional Chinese Medical education system also follows the western medical education. In the views of medical sociology, it shows very interesting phenomenon that the modernization of traditional area follows the western model of modernization. Moreover, it provides a good chance to discuss whether modernization and westernization of tradition is real development or not. Traditional Chinese Medicine had been the only institutional medicine in China for a long time. But the status of Traditional Chinese Medicine has been changed very rapidly since modern era. Shanghai Traditional Chinese Medical School was established in 1916. But National Party government tried to abolish Traditional Chinese Medicine and it met a crisis of maintenance. But the situation has been dramatically changed when Communist Party got the power in 1949. The Communist Government needed a chief medical service. And Traditional Chinese Medicine could meet the condition. Traditional Chinese Medicine could provide also the ideology of national superiority. Therefore, Traditional Chinese Medicine has been protected and developed by the assistance of the Communist Party. In the process, Traditional Chinese Medical education has been professionalized.

Analysis of Tranditional Chinese Medicine for Otitis Media with Effusion in Chinese Journals (삼출성 중이염에 대한 중의학 임상 논문 분석)

  • Kim, Su-Jin;Kim, Yeon-Soo;Jee, Seon-Young;Hwangbo, Min
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology and Dermatology
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    • v.33 no.3
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    • pp.69-85
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    • 2020
  • Objectives : The purpose of this study is to investigate the trend of Tranditional Chinese Medicine for Otitis Media with Effusion(OME) in Chinese journals. Methods : Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI) and Wanfang med online were used to search Chinese studies which were published from January, 2010 to April, 2020. Results : Among Chinese studies, Exterior-releasing medicinal(解表藥) and Heat-clearing medicinal(淸熱藥) were the most frequently used. The herbs which used the most frequently are Bupleuri Radix(柴胡), Acori Graminei Rhizoma(石菖蒲). All of studies have reported that Tranditional Chinese Medicine is effective for Otitis Media with Effusion. Conclusions : In analysis of selected studies, Tranditional Chinese Medicine is more effective than Western Medicine Treatments. Recurrence rates and side effects of OME can be reduced by cotreatment of Tranditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine Treatments.

Treatment of chemotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy with traditional Chinese medicine from the perspective of blood-arthralgia Zheng

  • Cao, Peng;Yang, Jie;Cai, Xueting;Wang, Xiaoning;Huo, Jiege
    • CELLMED
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    • v.2 no.4
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    • pp.30.1-30.4
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    • 2012
  • Traditional Chinese medicine classifies peripheral nerve impairment as paralysis and arthromyodynia, and considers that it is the result of defects of meridians and vessels, QI and blood, bones and muscles. Huangqi (Astragalus) Guizhi (Cassia Twig) Wuwu Tang, as a Qi invigorating formula, is usually used to improve peripheral nerve impairment. In recent years, some scholars have conducted research into Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) treatment with Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Tang and certain values of this treatment approach have been identified. CIPN is a type of blood-arthralgia Zheng in traditional Chinese medicine theory. In this review, we will discuss the treatment of CIPN with Huangqi Guizhi Wuwu Tang according to blood-arthtalgia Zheng.

Research on Traditional Chinese Medicine harmonising two approaches

  • Chung, Leung Ping;Wai, Lau Tai;Sang, Woo Kam
    • Advances in Traditional Medicine
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    • v.8 no.1
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    • pp.17-23
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    • 2008
  • While full recognition of the practical value of Traditional Chinese Medicine is being endorsed, the current stand on the research methodology of this field should be worked out. Since modern medicine has already developed a logical system of research methodology basing on the principles of deduction, any research on any system of medicine need to take reference to what is most popularly used and commonly recommended. The best way to approach research on Chinese Medicine, therefore, would be one that would take full reference to the methodology being used in modern medicine, while at the same time respecting the traditional approach. This would enable traditional medicine to be elevated to the level of general modern recognition. Nevertheless, innate problems in traditional medicine are making its research difficult. The problems lie in difficulties to achieve uniform herb supply, principles of randomization and placebo arrangements, uncertain chemical structures and toxicology etc. A practical approach centered on carefully planned evidence-based clinical trials, with parallel studies on biological activities and herb authentication is being recommended.

Chinese "External Medicine" and Its Views of the Body: A Case Study of the Manuscript "A Treatise on Seeking the Roots of Ulcer Medicine" (Yangyi Tan Yuan Lun (瘍醫探源論)) (中醫外科?什?不動手術? - ?代手抄本 ≪瘍醫探源論≫ 的身體物質觀)

  • Li, Jianmin
    • The Journal of Korean Medical History
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    • v.28 no.2
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    • pp.121-138
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    • 2015
  • This paper primarily discusses the materiality of the body in Chinese "external medicine". Chinese external medicine views the body as something consisting of sinew and flesh. Furthermore, there are times when Chinese surgical techniques must be applied to the body in order to manage rotting flesh and other abnormal manifestations. The materiality of the Chinese body of external medicine encompasses the way in which Chinese doctors manufactured surgical implements, the sick person's bodily experience of pus and pain associated with external diseases, and the details of the process by which doctors evaluated whether or not to carry out surgical interventions. This essay will use the Qing manuscript "A Treatise on Seeking the Roots of Ulcer Medicine" as a central case study for discussing these issues, while also showing the connections between it and other external medicine texts of the Ming and Qing era. Its author, Zhu Feiyuan, was a doctor who lived during the 18th to 19th century in Qingpu (today's Shanghai). My essay will thus discuss Chinese external medicine from a historical perspective. The way in external medicine treated illness differed from the prescriptions and pulse signs that "internal medicine" employed, and its view of the body likewise differed from that of internal medicine. I hope that this essay can provide new viewpoints on the history of the body in Chinese medicine.