• Title, Summary, Keyword: Childhood cancer

Search Result 175, Processing Time 0.032 seconds

Long-term follow-up study and long-term care of childhood cancer survivors

  • Park, Hyeon-Jin
    • Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics
    • /
    • v.53 no.4
    • /
    • pp.465-470
    • /
    • 2010
  • The number of long-term survivors is increasing in the western countries due to remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer. The long-term complications of childhood cancer survivors in these countries were brought to light by the childhood cancer survivor studies. In Korea, the 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer patients is approaching 70%; therefore, it is extremely important to undertake similar long-term follow-up studies and comprehensive long-term care for our population. On the basis of the experiences of childhood cancer survivorship care of the western countries and the current Korean status of childhood cancer survivors, long-term follow-up study and long-term care systems need to be established in Korea in the near future. This system might contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of childhood cancer survivors through effective intervention strategies.

Data Quality of Childhood Cancer in Khon Kaen, Thailand, 1990-2007

  • Suwanrungruang, Krittika;Kamsa-ard, Supot;Wiangnon, Surapon
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.18
    • /
    • pp.7985-7987
    • /
    • 2014
  • Introduction: Khon Kaen Cancer Registry (KKCR) was established in 1984. KKCR aims to collect all cancer cases in Khon Kaen Province. The poorly qualified data may lead to distort the cancer burden and misinterpretation of policy maker. Objective: To assess data quality in childhood cancer between 1990 and 2007 in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. Materials and Methods: Data of childhood cancer cases aged less than 20 years diagnosed during 1990-2007 were retrieved from the population-based data set of KKCR. All childhood cancer data were verified before data entry. Internal consistency, percentage of morphological verification (MV%) and cancer cased of the basis of diagnosis by death certificate only (DCO%) were evaluated. The age-adjusted rate (ASR) was calculated by standard method. Results: The data of childhood cancer from KKCR is acceptably qualified which reflects the quality of the whole registration.

Overview of Childhood Cancers at a Regional Cancer Centre in North-East India

  • Hazarika, Munlima;Krishnatreya, Manigreeva;Bhuyan, Cidananda;Saikia, Bhargab Jyoti;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Nandy, Pintu;Hazarika, Monalisha;Roy, Partha Sarathi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.18
    • /
    • pp.7817-7819
    • /
    • 2014
  • Childhood cancers are relatively uncommon in comparison to adult cancers. There is no literature available to shed light on clinic-pathological types and patterns of care for childhood cancers in our population in North-East India. In this analysis we therefore tried to determine the common childhood cancers diagnosed in our institute, clinical profile of the patients, types of treatment and compliance, and median survival estimates. Leukemia was most common, followed by retinoblastoma, central nervous system tumours and lymphomas. Ascertaining the clinic-pathological profile of childhood cancers in our population is essential for allocation and management of resources for this small but important group of patients.

Review of Childhood Cancer Survivors' Health-related Need (소아암 생존자의 건강관련 요구에 대한 고찰)

  • Lim, Su-Jin
    • Journal of the Korea Convergence Society
    • /
    • v.11 no.3
    • /
    • pp.361-368
    • /
    • 2020
  • The purpose of this study was to identify studies related to childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs and analyze scales for measurement of childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs. Studies related to childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs were retrieved from computerized databases using a manual search. The review included 17 studies. The main domains of childhood cancer survivors' health related needs were derived from the studies was psychosocial needs. 4 need assessment scales analyzed in this study were developed in foreign countries. scales were not suitable for the measurement of the needs of Korea childhood cancer survivors. Thus, should be developed comprehensive health related needs scale of childhood cancer survivors in future study.

Childhood Cancer Incidence and Survival 1985-2009, Khon Kaen, Thailand

  • Wiangnon, Surapon;Jetsrisuparb, Arunee;Komvilaisak, Patcharee;Suwanrungruang, Krittika
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.18
    • /
    • pp.7989-7993
    • /
    • 2014
  • Background: The Khon Kaen Cancer Registry (KKCR) was established in 1984. Previous population-based incidences and survivals of childhood cancer in Thailand were determined using a short cancer registration period. Materials and Methods: Data were retrieved of all children residing in Khon Kaen, between 0-15 years, diagnosed as having cancer and registered in the KKCR (1985-2009). The follow-up censored date was December 31, 2012. The childhood cancers were classified into 12 diagnostic groups, according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The incidence was calculated by the standard method. Survival of childhood cancer was investigated using the KKCR population-based registration data and overall survival calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: In the study period, 912 newly diagnosed cases of childhood cancer were registered. The respective mean and median age was 6.4 (SD=4.6) and 6 (0-14) years. The age-peak for incidence was 0-4 years. The age-standardized rate (ASR) was 83 per million. Leukemia was the most common cancer (N=360, ASR 33.8) followed by neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS, N=150, ASR 12.8) and lymphoma (N=79, ASR 7.0). The follow-up duration totaled 101,250 months. The death rate was 1.11 per 100 person-months (95%CI: 1.02 -1.20). The 5-year overall survival was 52% (95%CI: 53-56.9) for all cancers. The respective 5-year overall survival for (1) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), (2) acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), (3) lymphoma, (4) germ cell tumors, (5) renal tumors, (6) retinoblastoma, (7) soft tissue tumors, (8) CNS tumors, (9) bone tumors, (10) liver tumors, and (11) neuroblastoma was (1) 51%, (2) 37%, (3) 63%, (4) 74%, (5) 67%, (6) 55%, (7) 46%, (8) 44%, (9) 36%, (10) 34%, and (11) 25%. Conclusions: The incidence of childhood cancer is lower than those of western countries. Respective overall survival for ALL, lymphoma, renal tumors, liver tumors, retinoblastoma, soft tissue tumors is lower than that reported in developed countries while survival for CNS tumors, neuroblastoma and germ cell tumors is comparable.

Childhood Cancer Survivor's Services Needs for the Better Quality of Life (소아암 완치자의 삶의 질 향상을 위한 서비스 욕구)

  • Kim, Min-Ah;Yi, Jae-Hee
    • Child Health Nursing Research
    • /
    • v.18 no.1
    • /
    • pp.19-28
    • /
    • 2012
  • Purpose: The study aimed to identity specific needs for services and programs to help childhood cancer survivors adjust and adapt to life after treatment. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 childhood cancer survivors, diagnosed with cancer before the age of 18 and currently between 15 and 39 years of age. Each survivor had completed his/her cancer treatment. Results: The participating cancer survivors reported needs for services related to psychological counseling, schooling and learning, social skills, mentorship, integrated health management, self support activities, families of survivors, and public recognition and awareness. Conclusion: The results of the study indicate a need to better understand childhood cancer survivors, provides a basis for developing various services and programs to improve the quality of life among childhood cancer patients, survivors, and their families, and supports the importance of psychosocial adjustment.

Bone mineral density deficits in childhood cancer survivors: Pathophysiology, prevalence, screening, and management

  • Kang, Min Jae;Lim, Jung Sub
    • Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics
    • /
    • v.56 no.2
    • /
    • pp.60-67
    • /
    • 2013
  • As chemotherapy and other sophisticated treatment strategies evolve and the number of survivors of long-term childhood cancer grows, the long-term complications of treatment and the cancer itself are becoming ever more important. One of the most important but often neglected complications is osteoporosis and increased risk of fracture during and after cancer treatment. Acquisition of optimal peak bone mass and strength during childhood and adolescence is critical to preventing osteoporosis later in life. However, most childhood cancer patients have multiple risk factors for bone mineral loss. Cancer itself, malnutrition, decreased physical activity during treatment, chemotherapeutic agents such as steroids, and radiotherapy cause bone mineral deficit. Furthermore, complications such as growth hormone deficiency and musculoskeletal deformity have negative effects on bone metabolism. Low bone mineral density is associated with fractures, skeletal deformity, pain, and substantial financial burden not only for childhood cancer survivors but also for public health care systems. Thus, it is important to monitor bone health in these patients and minimize their risk of developing osteoporosis and fragility fractures later in life.

The Experience of Siblings of children with Cancer (암환아 형제자매의 경험)

  • Cheon Na Young
    • Child Health Nursing Research
    • /
    • v.4 no.2
    • /
    • pp.294-304
    • /
    • 1998
  • Illness is a situational crisis which affects entire family members. Children have different experiences and responses when their sibling has a cancer. there are many studies on sibling experiences to childhood cancer which have many problems in the USA. The main purpose of this study is to describe sibling experiences to childhood cancer accurately and coprehensively by collecting data from sibling to provide the data to develop nursing interventions for the families with childhood cancer. The data was collected from October 1 to November 6, 1995. A total of ten siblings with childhood cancer were interviewed. The meaningful contents were classified and categorized to four areas. Theses areas include knowledge and perception related to illness, changes in family life, changes in school life, and siblings' marturation. The results of this study were as follows 1. Knowledge and perception related to childhood cancer : Children had limited knowledge about illness and expressed the desire to tow more about sibling's illness. 2. Changes in family and school life : Children expressed loneness, emptiness, sadness, depression about seperation with the mother and sibling, family mood change, leisure activities and financial difficulites. Many children reported that their school performance had suffered since sibling's illness. 3. Maturation of children : Some positive outcoms related to having a sibling with a cancer are maturation, increased affection for the sibling, empathy for their parents. The results of this study indicate that it is important to develop comprehensive nursing intervention programs for the families with a childhood cancer.

  • PDF

Concept Analysis of Stress in Siblings of Patients with Childhood Cancer (소아암 환자 형제자매의 스트레스 개념분석)

  • Yu, Juyoun;Bang, Kyung-Sook
    • Child Health Nursing Research
    • /
    • v.23 no.2
    • /
    • pp.190-198
    • /
    • 2017
  • Purpose: This study was conducted to define the concept of stress in siblings of childhood cancer patients. Methods: The hybrid model was used to perform the concept analysis of stress in childhood cancer patients' siblings. Through reviews of 16 studies in the theoretical phase and interviews with 20 siblings in the field phase, the derived results were brought together in the integration phase. Results: The concept of stress in siblings of patients with childhood cancer was found to have 6 attributes and 28 indicators in 3 domains. Personal factors included 2 attributes (fear about childhood cancer and immature coping skills), and family factors had 2 attributes (changes in relationships with family and changes in family environment), social factors had 2 attributes (changes in relationships with friends and in the school experience, and insufficient social support). Conclusion: The stress of siblings of childhood cancer patients was defined as a state of tension associated with personal, family, social factors that can be related to their siblings' childhood cancer. The findings in this study provide the base for the development of a tool for measuring siblings' stress and/or the development of nursing programs for these siblings.

Psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors

  • Seo, Jong-Jin
    • Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics
    • /
    • v.53 no.4
    • /
    • pp.471-476
    • /
    • 2010
  • The majority of childhood cancer survivors and their families will be psychologically healthy, but may desire and benefit from preventive care. A significant portion of the survivor population will be psychosocially distressed in various aspects by their harsh experience of long cancer treatment, and may warrant professional intervention and treatment. Pediatricians should be aware of the late psychological effects that can occur a year or 2 after treatment, possibly in many aspects of a survivor's life. Not only the cancer diagnosis, but also treatments such as chemotherapy, irradiation, and surgical intervention may exert different long-term effects on the psychosocial outcomes of survivors. Pediatricians need to be more concerned with maintaining and improving the psychological health of this growing number of childhood cancer survivors through long-term follow-up clinics, community support, or self-help groups. Research on all of the psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors is important to recognize the reality and problems they face in Korea.