• Title, Summary, Keyword: Carcass Composition

Search Result 313, Processing Time 0.04 seconds

BETWEEN-BREED DIFFERENCES OF CARCASS COMPOSITION IN CATTLE

  • Hirooka, H.;Yamada, Y.;Dahlan, I.;Miyazaki, A.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.2 no.4
    • /
    • pp.607-613
    • /
    • 1989
  • The validity of the hypothesis that between-breed differences of carcass composition in cattle can be reduced when compared at the same degree of maturity was assessed using carcass data of various breeds obtained from slaughter experiments in Denmark, Japan and Malaysia. All cattle were kept in intensive feeding conditions in this study. With respect to temperate data (Danish and Japanese data), although large between-breed differences were found in carcass composition in the comparison at the same slaughter weight, the differences were reduced when compared at the same degree of maturity. This result supported the above hypothesis. Kedah-Kelantan and their crosses in Malaysian data, however, had more muscle and bone contents but less fat content than temperate breeds, even if compared at the same degree of maturity. This could be attributed to the history that native Kedah-Kelantan breed has adapted itself in the direction of decreasing fat deposition which requires much energy and prevents heat evaporation, in order to survive under high temperature and high humiodity conditions in Malaysia. In spite of the same tropical breed, carcass composition of Sahiwal-Friesian was similar to that of other temperate breeds at the same degree of maturity.

Effects of fungal (Lentinussajor-caju) treated oil palm frond on performance and carcass characteristics in finishing goats

  • Chanjula, Pin;Petcharat, Vasun;Cherdthong, Anusorn
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.30 no.6
    • /
    • pp.811-818
    • /
    • 2017
  • Objective: This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fungal treated oil palm fronds (FTOPF) on performance, carcass traits, meat quality, and muscle chemical composition. Methods: Eighteen growing crossbred male goats (Thai Native${\times}$Anglo Nubian) with $18.7{\pm}2.0kg$ of initial body weight (BW) were stratified and blocked by BW in a randomized complete block design. Three diets containing 30% of oil palm fronds (OPF) either untreated (UOPF) or treated with Lentinussajor-caju (FTOPF) with or without urea (FTOPFU) were used as roughage sources in total mixed rations (TMRs). The diets were offered ad libitum and weight gain was determined. At the end of the experimental period, the harvest data and carcass characteristics of the goats were recorded, and muscular longissimus dorsi composition was determined. Results: No significant effect of fungal treated (FT) inclusion was observed in any of the feed intake, growth performance, and carcass characteristics. Likewise, no apparent effects on carcass composition and muscle chemical composition were detected in this study, except for hind leg and chump were affected (p<0.05) by FT inclusion. Conclusion: In conclusion, feeding of fungal (Lentinussajor-caju) treated oil palm frond in TMR diet did not affect performance and carcass characteristics in finishing goats.

EFFECT OF FEEDING CLOMIPHENE CITRATE ON CARCASS COMPOSITION OF BROILER

  • Ali, M.A.;Shingari, B.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.2 no.1
    • /
    • pp.17-21
    • /
    • 1989
  • Four seasonal trials were conducted to study the effect of feeding clomiphene citrate on carcass composition of broilers. It was fed at 5, 10, 15 mg levels per kg feed for a period of two weeks, 3-4 weeks ($S_1$), 4-5 weeks ($S_2$) and 5-6 weeks ($S_3$) of age. Total carcasses were analysed for moisture, ether extract and protein. Clomiphene citrate significantly decreased the moisture with concomitant increase in ether extract content of the carcasses at all the ages and seasons. Carcass protein was significantly decreased at all the ages and seasons. The responses in the different level of clomiphene citrate is dose dependent. The carcass moisture decreased with age while protein and ether extract contents increased in all seasons. The females had more ether extract and less moisture contents than male. The carcass ether extract was higher in summer and rainy seasons followed by spring and winter seasons, and the differences were significant. A concomitant significant decrease of carcass moisture was observed. The effect of seasons on carcass protein varied at different ages but there appeared to be a trend towards decreasing carcass protein in summer and rainy seasons than winter and spring seasons.

Estimation of Correlation Coefficients between Histological Parameters and Carcass Traits of Pig Longissimus Dorsi Muscle

  • Ryu, Y.C.;Rhee, M.S.;Kim, B.C.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.17 no.3
    • /
    • pp.428-433
    • /
    • 2004
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the histochemical parameters of muscle fibers, and to estimate the correlation between these histological parameters and carcass traits in pigs. A total of 230 crossbred Duroc$\times$(Yorkshire$\times$Landrace) pigs (149 gilts and 81 castrated male pigs) was evaluated. Carcass traits (carcass weight, backfat thickness, and loin eye area), muscle fiber size (crosssectional area, diameter, and perimeter), muscle fiber number (density of fibers/$mm^2$ and total number of fibers), and fiber type composition (percentages of myofibers and relative areas of each fiber type) were evaluated. Mean cross-sectional area (CSA) and type IIB fiber CSA were positively correlated to carcass weight, backfat thickness and loin eye area. Mean fiber CSA was mostly related to type IIB CSA (r=0.98) as a result of the high percentage of type IIB fibers in the longissimus muscle. Correlations between fiber diameters and perimeters were also high, and showed similar results with CSA. Mean fiber density was negatively correlated to carcass weight (r=-0.24), backfat thickness (r=-0.18) and loin eye area (r=-0.27). To the contrary, total fiber number was positively correlated with carcass weight (r=0.27) and loin eye area (r=0.53). Carcass weight and loin eyZe area were not significantly related to muscle fiber composition. For backfat thickness, there was an opposition between type IIA percentage, which was positively related and type IIB percentage, which was negatively related. Fiber type composition of type I and IIA fibers were negatively correlated to that of type IIB fibers (r=-0.67 to -0.74). In the present study, carcass weight and loin eye area were positively correlated to CSA and negatively correlated to fiber density. But, these relationships were generally low. The fiber density was strongly affected by muscle fiber size and the total fiber number was affected either by CSA of muscle fiber and loin eye area. Fiber type composition was much more related to their numerical abundance than their CSA.

Efficacy of Cr (III) Supplementation on Growth, Carcass Composition, Blood Metabolites, and Endocrine Parameters in Finishing Pigs

  • Wang, M.Q.;He, Y.D.;Lindemann, M.D.;Jiang, Z.G.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.22 no.10
    • /
    • pp.1414-1419
    • /
    • 2009
  • The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of trivalent chromium from different sources on growth, carcass composition, and serum parameters in finishing pigs. Ninety-six crossbred pigs with an initial average body weight of 65.57${\pm}$1.05 kg were blocked by body weight and randomly assigned to four treatments with three replicates. Pigs were offered one of four diets including a control diet or the control diet supplemented with 200 ${\mu}g/kg$ chromium from either chromium chloride ($CrCl_{3}$), chromium picolinate (CrPic) or chromium nanocomposite (CrNano) for 40 days. After completion of the feeding trial, eight pigs from each treatment were selected to collect blood samples, and slaughtered to measure carcass composition. The results showed that supplemental chromium had no significant effect on growth performance, while CrNano increased carcass lean proportion and loin Longissimus muscle area (p<0.05), and decreased carcass fat proportion and 10th rib backfat depth (p<0.05). CrPic supplementation also resulted in lower fat proportion and larger Longissimus muscle area (p<0.05). The addition of Cr from CrNano or CrPic decreased serum glucose (p<0.05) and increased concentrations of total protein and free fat acid in serum (p<0.05). Serum urea nitrogen, triglyceride and cholesterol were decreased (p<0.05), and serum high density lipoprotein and lipase activity were increased (p<0.05) with the supplementation of CrNano. Serum insulin was decreased (p<0.05) by supplemental Cr from CrNano or CrPic, and serum insulin-like growth factor I was increased significantly in the CrNano treated group. These results suggest that chromium nanocomposite has higher efficacy on carcass composition in pigs compared to the traditional chromium sources.

EFFECTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL CHROMIUM PICOLINATE ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE, CARCASS COMPOSITION AND SERUM TRAITS OF BROILERS FED DIETS VARYING IN PROTEIN AND LYSINE

  • Kim, S.W.;Han, I.K.;Shin, I.S.;Chae, B.J.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.8 no.5
    • /
    • pp.455-462
    • /
    • 1995
  • Arbor Acres broiler chickens (N=288) with an average initial weight of 59.4 g were fed diets varying in protein and lysine (80, 100, 120% of NRC; 100, 120% of NRC, 1984) in order to investigate the effects of supplemental chromium picolinate on growth performance, nutrient utilizability, carcass composition, serum traits and in vitro protein synthesis. Six replicates of eight chicks were grouped into one treatment Six chicks were sacrificed from each treatment for carcass analysis, and six additional chicks were chosen and dissected for in vitro culture of liver tissue. Body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion, mortality, carcass composition and serum glucose, HDL/cholesterol ratio, serum triglyceride and serum nonesterified fatty acid appeared to be affected by either the level of dietary crude protein or lysine when supplemented with 200 ppb chromium picolinate (p < 0.05). Retained and secreted proteins in liver acinar cell cultured in vitro were not affected by dietary lysine level but affected by dietary protein level when added with 200 ppb chromium picolinate.

Effects of Dietary Bamboo Charcoal on the Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Fattening Pigs

  • Chu, Gyo Moon;Kim, Jong Hyun;Kang, Sung Nam;Song, Young Min
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
    • /
    • v.33 no.3
    • /
    • pp.348-355
    • /
    • 2013
  • The purpose of this study was to investage the effects of dietary bamboo charcoal on the carcass characteristics and meat quality of fattening pigs. Fifty four crossed pigs of $61.0{\pm}1.0$ kg body weight (BW) were grouped and housed in 6 animals (3 barrows and 3 gilts) per pen and 3 replications per treatment. The basal diet (C) was supplied with 0.3% bamboo charcoal as treatment 1 (T1) and 0.6 % as treatment 2 (T2). The pigs were fed that experimental diet for 42 days, thereafter 10 longissimus dorsi (LD) per treatment were randomly collected at the time the pigs reached an average weight of $110.0{\pm}5.0$ kg. The carcass weight, backfat thickness, and the carcass grade were better (p<0.05) in the pigs fed bamboo charcoal than in C. The crude fat concentration of LD was higher (p<0.05) in T1 than in C. While the composition of stearic acid and arachidonic acid was lower (p<0.05) in treatments than in C, the composition of oleic acid and linoleic acid of treatments was higher (p<0.05) than C. The physico-chemical characteristics, such as meat color and amino acid composition of LD were not affected (p>0.05) by the supplemented bamboo charcoal. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with bamboo charcoal improved the carcass grade and fatty acids composition of pork meat from fattening pigs, where the composition of unsaturated fatty acids was increased, but that of saturated fatty acids was decreased.

Effects of Mannan-oligosaccharides and Live Yeast in Diets on the Carcass, Cut Yields, Meat Composition and Colour of Finishing Turkeys

  • Konca, Yusuf;Kirkpinar, Figen;Mert, Selim
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.22 no.4
    • /
    • pp.550-556
    • /
    • 2009
  • This study was designed to evaluate the effects of dietary prebiotic (mannan oligosaccharide = MOS) and probiotic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae = SC) in finishing turkey diets on carcass, cut yield, meat composition and colour. A total of 72 ten-weeksold Big6 male turkey poults were used in the trial. There were eight replicate floor pens per floor with three birds in each. The experiment lasted up to 20 wks of age. The trial was set up as a completely randomized design with 3 dietary treatments. The treatments were: i) negative control (C, no additive); ii) MOS 1 g per kg of diet and iii) SC 1 g per kg of diet (strain SC47, $300{\times}10^{10}$ CFU/kg). Body weight (BW) and feed intake were determined for each of the two week intervals. Twenty-four birds were slaughtered and eviscerated to determine carcass, carcass parts and internal organ weights at 20 wks of age. Meat colour and pH levels were measured 24 h after slaughter. The dietary treatments did not affect BW and average daily gain during the trial (p>0.05). The average daily feed intake and feed conversion ratio of turkey toms fed with MOS were higher than those of control and SC groups during the overall period (p<0.05). The dietary treatments did not affect carcass yield, breast meat, thigh, wing, liver, heart, empty gizzard, intestine, and abdominal fat pad proportions and meat pH, composition and pigmentation (p>0.05). These results suggest that the addition of MOS and SC is not likely to produce any performance or carcass characteristics in finishing turkeys at 10 to 20 wks of age.

Effect of Potato By-products Based Silage on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Fatty Acid Composition of Carcass Fats in Holstein Steers

  • Pen, B.;Oyabu, T.;Hidaka, S.;Hidari, H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.18 no.4
    • /
    • pp.490-496
    • /
    • 2005
  • Ten 18.5-month old Holstein steers were allocated into two diet groups of five and fed either concentrates as control group or potato by-products based silage (PBS) as experimental group for six months to investigate the effect of PBS on growth performance, carcass characteristics and fatty acid composition of carcass fats. The PBS diet consisted, in a DM basis, of 74.5% PBS, 16% hay, and 9.5% soybean milk residue (SMR). The control diet consisted, in a DM basis, of 82.5% concentrates and 17.5% hay. There were no significant differences in the overall average daily gain (ADG), dry matter intake (DMI), feed efficiency, yield score and meat quality score of dressed carcass between the two diet groups. There were no statistical differences in DM, crude protein (CP), and ether extract (EE) of beef and melting point of all adipose tissues from steers fed both diets. The PBS-fed steers tended to have lower Warner Bratzler shear (WBS) values than in the concentrate-fed steers (13.0 vs. 17.7 lb, p<0.1). At both sampling times 3 and 6 months of feeding period, PBS-fed steers had higher proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially linoleic (C18:2) acids in subcutaneous fat than in control group (p<0.05). PBS-fed steers had significantly higher proportions of PUFA, especially C18:2 fatty acids than in concentrate-fed steers in carcass fats (p<0.05). In conclusion, feeding PBS to fattening steers has shown to have the same potential as concentrate feeding in terms of effect on the growth performance, feed efficiency, and carcass characteristics. Interestingly, PBS also seems preferable to concentrates because it increased the proportion of C18:2 fatty acid composition of carcass fats which is valuable for beef consumers.

Effects of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil in diets on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot goats

  • Chanjula, Pin;Cherdthong, Anusorn
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.31 no.4
    • /
    • pp.514-521
    • /
    • 2018
  • Objective: This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil (CGWVO) on performance, carcass traits, meat quality, and muscle chemical composition. Methods: Twenty-four crossbred (Thai Native${\times}$Anglo Nubian) uncastrated male goats ($16.8{\pm}0.46kg$ body weight [BW]) were assigned to a completely randomized design and subjected to four experimental diets containing 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% of CGWVO (63.42% of glycerol and 47.78% of crude fat) on a dry matter (DM) basis. The diets were offered ad libitum as total mixed rations twice daily. The feed intake, feeding behavior, growth performance, carcass and meat traits, and muscle chemical composition were evaluated. Results: Based on this experiment, there were significant differences (p>0.05) among groups regarding DM intake, growth performance, and carcass traits where goats receiving 6% of CGWVO had lower daily DM intake, growth performance, and carcass traits than those fed on 0%, 2%, and 4% of CGWVO. There were no effects of CGWVO on carcass length, carcass width, Longissimus muscle (LM) area, Warner-Bratzler shear force, pH and color of LM at 45 min after slaughter, as well as on other carcass cut and muscle chemical composition. Conclusion: In conclusion, the addition of up to 4% of DM in the diets for crossbred finishing goats seems to be the most interesting strategy, since it promotes greatest animal performance. Moreover, this study was a suitable approach to exploit the use of biodiesel production from waste vegetable oil for goat production.