• Title, Summary, Keyword: Cancer screening

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Factors Affecting Cancer Screening Intention and Behavior of the Korean Elderly

  • Kim, Hee-Jung;Yim, Hyun-Woo;Kim, Nam-Cho
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.19
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    • pp.8461-8467
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    • 2014
  • Background: In this study we investigated factors influencing cancer screening intention and behavior to develop measures to increase the rate of cancer screening in the Korean elderly. Materials and Methods: Participants included 425 elderly subjects 65 years of age or older from D city, South Korea. The health behavior characteristics and cancer screening-related and theory of planned behavior (TPB) factors influencing the participant attitudes on cancer screening were examined to identify determinants significantly affecting cancer screening intentions and behavior. Results: Predictive factors influencing cancer screening behavior included smoking, exercise, cancer concerns, preference for the type of cancer screening, prior experience with the National Cancer Screening Program, perception of the National Cancer Screening Program, behavioral control with respect to cancer screening and cancer screening intentions. The factors influencing cancer screening behavior were different from those for cancer screening intentions. Conclusions: Increasing the cancer screening intentions of the elderly is necessary to raise the rates of cancer screening. Additionally, identifying the inhibitory factors that serve as obstacles to cancer screening in the elderly and changing screening intentions into actual screening behavior is necessary. This study provides a reference for developing and applying policy measures and intervention strategies to increase the cancer screening rates of the elderly in Korea.

What is the Most Effective Strategy for Improving the Cancer Screening Rate in Japan?

  • Sano, Hiroshi;Goto, Rei;Hamashima, Chisato
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.6
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    • pp.2607-2612
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    • 2014
  • Background: Cancer screening rates in Japan are much lower than those in Western countries. This study evaluated the relationship between cancer screening rates and strategies used to improve screening rates, and determined which strategy is the most effective. Materials and Methods: All municipalities are responsible for conducting gastric, lung, colorectal, cervical, and breast cancer screenings in Japan. Of the 1,746 municipalities in total, 92-99% were included in the analyses for each cancer screening. Using national data in 2009, the correlations between cancer screening rates and strategies for improving screening rates of all municipalities, both large (populations of over 30,000) and small (populations of under 30,000), were determined. The strategies used were as follows: sending personal invitation letters, personal visits by community health workers, use of a clinical setting for screening, and free screening. Results: Of all four strategies used to improve cancer screening rates, sending personal invitation letters had the highest correlations with all screening rates, with the exception of breast cancer screening. The partial correlation coefficients linking this strategy with the screening rates in all municipalities were 0.28, 0.32, 0.30, and 0.26 for gastric, lung, colorectal, and cervical cancer screening, respectively. In large municipalities, the correlations between the number of examinees in a clinical setting and the screening rates were also relatively high, particularly for cervical cancer screening (r=0.41). Conclusions: Sending personal invitation letters appears to be particularly effective in improving cancer screening rates in all municipalities. All municipalities should implement a system that sends personal invitation letters for cancer screening. In large municipalities, increasing the availability of screening in a clinical setting is also effective in improving cancer screening rates.

Why Screening Rates Vary between Korea and Japan-Differences between Two National Healthcare Systems

  • Goto, Rei;Hamashima, Chisato;Mun, Sunghyun;Lee, Won-Chul
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.395-400
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    • 2015
  • Both Japan and Korea provide population-based screening programs. However, screening rates are much higher in Korea than in Japan. To clarify the possible factors explaining the differences between these two countries, we analyzed the current status of the cancer screening and background healthcare systems. Population-based cancer screening in Korea is coordinated well with social health insurance under a unified insurer system. In Japan, there are over 3,000 insurers and coordinating a comprehensive strategy for cancer screening promotion has been very difficult. The public healthcare system also has influence over cancer screening. In Korea, public healthcare does not cover a wide range of services. Almost free cancer screening and subsidization for medical cost for cancers detected in population-screening provides high incentive to participation. In Japan, on the other hand, a larger coverage of medical services, low co-payment, and a lenient medical audit enables people to have cancer screening under public health insurance as well as the broad range of cancer screening. The implementation of evidence-based cancer screening programs may be largely dependent on the background healthcare system. It is important to understand the impacts of each healthcare system as a whole and to match the characteristics of a particular health system when designing an efficient cancer screening system.

Cancer Screening Rate and Related Factors in Rural Area (농촌지역주민의 암 조기검진과 관련 요인에 관한 연구)

  • Chang, Soung-Hoon;Lee, Won-Jin;Lee, Kun-Sei
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
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    • v.33 no.3
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    • pp.364-372
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    • 2000
  • Objectives : Cancer is the second most frequent cause of death in Korea. Cancer screening tests can save lives through early detection. Enhancing the cancer screening rate is an important strategy for reducing cancer mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the screening rate and related factors in a rural area. The study investigated relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, several preventive behaviors, and the experience of several cancer screening behaviors. Materials and Methods : The study population was recruited voluntarily from the three rural areas(Myen) in Chungju city. The participants completed structured questionnaire from July 21, 1990 to July 26, 1998. Results : The proportions of the study population who had previously received stomach, liver, breast, or cervix cancer screening tests were 24.5%, 18.5%, 27.0%, 59.2% respectively. The 1-year screening rates of stomach, liver, breast, and cervix cancer were 7.4%, 6.8%, 8.6%, 15.6% respectively. In multivariate logistic analysis, some sociodemographic variables, preventive behaviors, or psychological variables were significantly associated with several cancer screening tests. Those who had previously received a stomach cancer screening test were significantly associated with the presence of chronic disease, physician's recommendation, use of alcohol family history of cancer, or previous liver cancer screening test. Those who had previously received a liver cancer screening test were associated with education level, physician's recommendation and previous stomach cancer screening test. Those who had received a cervix cancer screening test were significantly associated with education level, presence of a transportation vehicle, physician's recommendation use of alcohol and previous breast cancer screening test. And those who had received a previous breast cancer screening test were significantly associated with age, marital status, and earlier cervix cancer screening test. Conclusion : Based on the results of this study a strategy to promote cancer screening and health objectives at the district level can be made.

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The Approach Method of Community-based Cancer Screening Program in Japan (일본의 지역사회 암 조기 검진사업에 관한 접근 방안)

  • Kim, Yeong-Bok
    • Journal of Korea Association of Health Promotion
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    • v.3 no.2
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    • pp.137-146
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    • 2005
  • The Community based cancer screening program passed in 1960 was a milestone for initiating a national and local health program in Japan. And since then local governments and Cancer Society have been developing and providing cancer screening programs of Stomach, Cervix, Breast and Colorectum for population. To apply the effectiveness of community based cancer screening program, it is important to understand the key issue related to cancer screening participation of population and technology of cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to understand the community based cancer screening program in Japan, and to apply the information for establishment of community based cancer screening program in Korea. The characteristics of community based cancer screening program in Japan were as follows. The first, community based cancer screening program was implemented by the National Health and Medical Services Law for the Aged since 1983. The second, Cancer Society and Cancer Detection Center were core for cancer screening program. The third, the budget for cancer screening program was established by the National Health and Hygiene. The fourth, the continuous quality control for medical staff was provided by Cancer Society and Cancer Detection Center The fifth, the efforts for the promotion of cancer screening rate.

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Factors Affecting Early Cancer Screening for Lung Cancer: Focusing on Lung Cancer Screening Subjects (폐암의 조기 암검진 여부에 미치는 요인: 폐암 검진 사업대상자를 중심으로)

  • Kim, Seok Hwan
    • The Journal of Korean Society for School & Community Health Education
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    • v.20 no.3
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    • pp.53-65
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    • 2019
  • Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the current status of cancer screening among subjects in the lung cancer screening cycle and to analyze the factors affecting the cancer screening of subjects in the lung cancer screening cycle. Methods: This study used the 'National Health and Nutrition Survey 7th Year (2017)' surveyed nationwide as the main data. The subjects are lung cancer screening projects, the dependent variable is early cancer screening, the independent variables are gender, age, marital status, household income level, education level, national health insurance type, private health insurance, The number of chronic diseases, general health examination, smoking status, drinking status, moderate intensity physical activity, stress perception rate, and weight control efforts were determined. Results: The results of this study showed that factors affecting early cancer screening of lung cancer screening subjects were gender, age, marital status, education level, national health insurance, smoking status, drinking status, moderate physical activity, and weight. Irrespective of the control effort, it was found that the private medical insurance, the number of chronic diseases, the medical examination, and the stress perception rate were affected. Conclusion: If the lung cancer screening subjects recognize the importance of early cancer screening themselves and create a social environment to increase their participation rate, lung cancer screening patients and their families will help them to live a healthy life.

Relationships between Knowledge about Early Detection, Cancer Risk Perception and Cancer Screening Tests in the General Public Aged 40 and Over (암 조기발견 지식.암발생 위험성 지각과 암 조기검진 수검 여부와의 관계: 40세 이상 일반인 대상으로)

  • Yang, Young-Hee
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.52-60
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: This study is to determine knowledge about early detection and risk perception of cancer according to taking cancer screening tests in the general population. Methods: The participants were 151 people aged 40 years or older. A questionnaire consisted of knowledge about early detection (warning signs, cancer screening methods, general knowledge for early detection), cancer risk perception and history of cancer screening during past 2 years. Results: The percentages of correct answers were 64.7% in knowledge about warning signs, 73.7% in knowledge of cancer screening tests and 80.1% in general knowledge for early detection. Participants had the highest knowledge about screening methods for stomach cancer and the lowest for liver and colon cancer. The level of risk perception was medium. The participants who participated in cancer screening showed lower risk perception than those who did not. There was no significant relationship between knowledge and performance of cancer screening. The primary reason for not participating in cancer screening was patient's perception of their own health. Conclusion: These results suggest that cancer risk perception can affect the performance of cancer screening and we need to study how to handle this problem. Additionally screening programs should focus on liver cancer and colon cancer.

Health Beliefs Associated with Cancer Screening Intentions in Korean Workers

  • Park, Kyoung-Ok;Kang, Jina
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.7
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    • pp.3301-3307
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    • 2016
  • Background: Cancer is a leading cause of death in Korea. To prevent cancer, it is essential to facilitate and promote appropriate cancer screening behavior in the adult population. The aim of this study was to examine health beliefs related to cancer screening intentions using the Health Belief Model (HBM). Materials and Methods: The research participants comprised 275 male health and safety managers at commercial companies in Korea. The self-administered survey explored demographic characteristics, cancer-related factors, beliefs about cancer/cancer screening (BCCS) (vulnerability to cancer, severity of cancer, benefits of screening, and barriers to screening), and cancer screening intention. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with an intention to be screened for cancer. Results: Perceived health status and need for cancer prevention education were major factors associated with BCCS. Poorer health status was associated with greater perceived vulnerability, a perception of fewer benefits, and more barriers (p<0.05). A perceived greater need for cancer prevention education was associated with a higher perceived severity of cancer and more perceived barriers to screening (p<0.05). Marital status, cancer screening experience, and perceived vulnerability to cancer were significant influences on the cancer screening intention (p<0.05). Participants who had undergone cancer screening in the past 2 years were more likely to intend to be screened for cancer than were those who had not been screened; this was true across all degrees of intention and all types of cancer (p<0.01). Hesitant people considered themselves less vulnerable to gastric, lung, and liver cancer than did the poeple who intended to undergo cancer screening (p<0.05). Conclusions: Based on our findings, we recommend that workplace cancer prevention programs attempt to increase awareness about vulnerability to cancer among workers who hesitate to undergo cancer screening.

Cancer Screening Status in Korea, 2011: Results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey

  • Park, Bo-Young;Choi, Kui-Son;Lee, Yoon-Young;Jun, Jae-Kwan;Seo, Hong-Gwan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.4
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    • pp.1187-1191
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    • 2012
  • This study was conducted to determine the use of screening for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers, which are included in the Korean National Cancer Screening Programme. In 2011 the National Cancer Centre in Korea conducted a nationwide, population-based, cross-sectional interview survey using multi-stage random sampling. Participants included 4,100 cancer-free men 40 years and over of age and women over 30 years of age. The lifetime screening rates for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 76.2%, 54.3%, 56.1%, 79.0%, and, 74.8%, respectively. The rates of recommended screening for stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 64.6%, 22.9%, 35.3%, 60.4%, and 62.4%, respectively. More than 70% of all screening was attributed to organised cancer screening programmes. The main reason given for non attendance was 'no symptoms'. A greater effort is needed to increase screening rates, especially for liver and colorectal cancers.

Intrinsic Motivation Factors Based on the Self-Determinant Theory for Regular Breast Cancer Screening

  • Jung, Su Mi;Jo, Heui-Sug
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.23
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    • pp.10101-10106
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    • 2015
  • The purpose of this study was to identify factors of intrinsic motivation that affect regular breast cancer screening and contribute to development of a program for strategies to improve effective breast cancer screening. Subjects were residing in South Korea Gangwon-Province and were female over 40 and under 69 years of age. For the investigation, the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) was modified to the situation of cancer screening and was used to survey 905 inhabitants. Multinominal logistic regression analyses were conducted for regular breast cancer screening (RS), one-time breast cancer screening (OS) and non-breast cancer screening (NS). For statistical analysis, IBM SPSS 20.0 was utilized. The determinant factors between RS and NS were "perceived effort and choice" and "stress and strain" - internal motivations related to regular breast cancer screening. Also, determinant factors between RS and OS are "age" and "perceived effort and choice" for internal motivation related to cancer screening. To increase regular screening, strategies that address individual perceived effort and choice are recommended.