• Title, Summary, Keyword: CSF Osmolality

Search Result 3, Processing Time 0.067 seconds

The Effects of Water Deprivation on Cerebrospinal Fluid Constituents During Feeding in Sheep

  • Sunagawa, Katsunori;Weisinger, Richard S.;McKinley, Michael J.;Purcell, Brett S.;Thomson, Craig;Burns, Peta L.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.14 no.4
    • /
    • pp.467-473
    • /
    • 2001
  • The internal humoral factors in the central regulation of dry feed intake during water deprivation in sheep were investigated by measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) constituents. Five animals were fed dried alfalfa chaff for 2 hours once a day. Sheep in the water deprivation treatment were deprived of water for 28 hours, while the sheep in the control treatment were given free access to water. During the first hour of the 2 hour feeding period, a rapid reduction in blood volume occured in both treatments (water deprivation and free access to water). The CSF concentrations of Na, Cl and osmolality during the second hour of the 2 hour feeding period in both treatments were greater (p<0.01) than those during the first hour. The drinking behaviors in sheep were concentrated during the second hour of the 2 hour feeding period in periods of free access to water. Water intake during feeding in periods of free access to water was 1110 ml/2 h. The levels of increase in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation were greater (p<0.01) than during periods of free access to water. The changes in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation produced more vigorous thirst sensations in the brain compared to during periods of free access to water. The eating rates for the first hour of the allotted 2 hour feeding period were the same under both treatments. However, the eating rates for the second hour during water deprivation periods decreased significantly (p<0.05) compared to those during periods of free access to water. The decreased eating rates for the second hour during water deprivation may be due to the vigorous thirst sensations produced in the brain. The results suggest that the increase in CSF osmolality with feeding during water deprivation acts as a thirst and satiety factor in brain mechanisms controlling feeding to decrease dry feed intake in water-deprived sheep.

The Role of Brain Somatostatin in the Central Regulation of Feed, Water and Salt Intake in Sheep

  • Sunagawa, Katsunori;Weisinger, Richard S.;McKinley, Michael J.;Purcell, Brett S.;Thomson, Craig;Burns, Peta L.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.14 no.7
    • /
    • pp.929-934
    • /
    • 2001
  • The physiological role of brain somatostatin in the central regulation of feed intake in sheep was investigated through a continuous intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of somatostastin 1-28 (SRIF) at a small dose of $5{\mu}g/0.2ml/hr$ for 98.5 hours from day 1 to day 5. Sheep (n=5) were fed for 2 hours once a day, and water and 0.5 M NaCI solution were given ad libitum. Feed, water and salt intake were measured during ICV infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and SRIF. The feed intake during SRIF infusion on days 2 to 5 increased significantly compared to that during CSF infusion. Water intake, when compared to that during CSF infusion, only increased significantly on day 4. NaCI intake during SRIF infusion was not different from that during CSF infusion. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate during SRIF infusion were not different from those during CSF infusion. The plasma concentrations of Na, K, Cl, osmolality and total protein during SRIF infusion were also not different from those values during CSF infusion.There are two possible mechanisms, that is, the suppression of brain SRIF on feed suppressing hormones and the direct actions on brain mechanisms controlling feed intake, explaining how SRIF works in the brain to bring about increases in feed intake in sheep fed on hay. The results indicate that brain SRIF increases feed intake in sheep fed on hay.

The Role of Neuropeptide Y in the Central Regulation of Grass Intake in Sheep

  • Sunagawa, K.;Weisiger, R.S.;McKinley, M.J.;Purcell, B.S.;Thomson, C.;Burns, P.L.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.14 no.1
    • /
    • pp.35-40
    • /
    • 2001
  • The physiological role of brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the central regulation of grass intake in sheep was investigated through a continuous intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of NPY at a dose of $5{\mu}g/0.2ml/hr$ for 98.5 hours from day 1 to day 5. Sheep (n=5) were fed for 2 hours once a day, and water and 0.5 M NaCl solution were given ad libitum. Feed intake during ICV NPY infusion increased significantly compared to that during ICV artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion. Water and NaCl intake during ICV NPY infusion remained unchanged. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and plasma osmolality during ICV NPY infusion were not significantly different from those during ICV CSF infusion. On the other hand, plasma glucose concentration during ICV NPY infusion increased significantly compared to that during ICV CSF infusion. The results suggest that brain NPY acts as a hunger factor in brain mechanisms controlling feeding to increase grass intake in sheep.