• Title/Summary/Keyword: Breast cancer

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Korean Immigrant Women's Meanings of Breast, Breast Cancer, and Breast Cancer Screenings

  • Suh Eun-Young Eunice
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.36 no.4
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    • pp.604-611
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    • 2006
  • Purpose. Koreans are one of the fastest growing Asian populations in the U.S. since 1960s. In Korean immigrant women (KIW), breast cancer was reported as the most frequently diagnosed cancer. However, their screening rates for breast cancer are lower than national guidelines; it is assumed that underlying cultural schemas of breast, breast cancer, and its screening modalities exist and need to be studied. This study was aimed to investigate cultural meanings of breast, breast cancer, and breast cancer screenings in KIW. Methods. Using cultural models theory from cognitive anthropology, naturalistic qualitative methodology was utilized. Three focus group interviews with fifteen KIW were conducted. Thematic analysis with constant comparison technique was performed eliciting units of meaning, categories, and themes. Results. The cultural schema of the meaning of breast is 'mother who is breast-feeding her baby,' with two themes of 'balance in size,' and 'shyness.' Regarding breast cancer, three themes, i.e., 'indifference,' 'fear,' and 'uncertainty' are emerged. 'Lack of information about screening modalities' is the overarching schema with reference to breast cancer screenings. Conclusions. The findings of this study demonstrate unique cultural models of KIW related to breast cancer and its screenings, which are critical to understand and penetrate their barriers to breast cancer screening.

Relationships Between Cause of Cancer and Breast Cancer-Related Factors in Breast Cancer Survivors

  • Wang, Hsiu-Ho;Chung, Ue-Lin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.8
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    • pp.3889-3892
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    • 2012
  • Aims: The purposes of this study were to (1) to identify the causes of cancer in breast cancer survivors in Taiwan; and (2) to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics and breast cancer-related factors on the cause of cancer. Materials and method: This study details the related investigative results on survivors with breast cancer using a descriptive and correlational design. A convenience sampling approach was employed. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the participants. Results: A total of 230 breast cancer survivors completed the questionnaire. Low-scoring cause of cancer participants were older adults (OR = 2.49, p<0.05) who were already of menopausal status (OR = 2.28, p < 0.05). Around 72% of particpants agreed high responsibility. Our breast cancer survivors felt stress had caused their breast cancer. Conclusion: These findings are helpful in understanding the relationship between cause of cancer and related factors in breast cancer survivors.

A Study on Dietary Patterns, Dietary Behaviors and Life Styles before and after Breast Cancer Surgery

  • Kyung-Ja Chang;Sei-Hyun Ahn
    • Korean Journal of Community Nutrition
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    • v.3 no.5
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    • pp.722-728
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    • 1998
  • The purpose of this study was to compare dietary patterns, dietary behaviors and life styles before and after breast cancer surgery in Korea. The subjects were 220 females who underwent surgery for stage I-III breast cancer at general hospitals. Food intake, eating habits, snacks, eating-out, use of nutritional supplements and healthy foods, and drinking and smoking habits were studied using a questionnaire. SAS program was used for statistical analysis of the data. The results are as follows : 1) Most subjects were housewives aged more than 40 years. 2) After breast cancer surgery, intakes of fruits and vegetables were increased and those of meat, salty and spicy foods were decreased. 3) There was a significant difference in takes of caffeine beverages, snacks, fast foods and instant foods before and after breast cancer surgery. 4) There was a significant difference in meal regularity and skipping breakfast before and after breast cancer surgery. 5) The frequency of eating-out was decreased and low-fat foods, such as Japanese foods, were preferred after breast cancer surgery. 6) Nutritional supplements and natural healthy foods were used more after breast cancer surgery. 7) Most subjects were non-smokers and drank little alcohol and the rate of regular drinking significantly decreased after breast cancer surgery. Therefore, there was a significant difference in dietary patterns and behaviors resulting form breast cancer. Further more, dietary factors may be a contributing factor in the incidence at breast cancer in Korea.

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Multidisciplinary Approach to Breast Cancer Care

  • Juon, Hee-Soon
    • Perspectives in Nursing Science
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    • v.4 no.1
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    • pp.1-8
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    • 2007
  • Aim: The purpose of this paper is to present the importance of multidisciplinary strategies in cancer prevention and control, especially comprehensive breast cancer care. Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among women and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Although the incidence of breast cancer in Asian countries is still lower than in Western countries, the rate of increase for the last two decades is striking. Methods: Data on cancer mortality, incidence, and risk factors were summarized by using the most recent data available from population-based cancer registries affiliated with the International Union Against Cancer, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR). Results: Global differences in breast cancer incidence and fluctuations in rates within a country still exist. The incidence of breast cancer in Asian countries was lower than in Western countries. Breast cancer incidence in the United States decreased each year during 1999-2003. On the other hand, morbidity and mortality related to breast cancer in Asia has increased significantly. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary strategies to reduce breast cancer mortality and promote breast cancer awareness are addressed. Lessons learned from multidisciplinary approaches to cancer treatment and control will be valuable in implementing future breast cancer research in the fields of basic, clinical, and population research in Asia.

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Risk Assessment of Breast Cancer in Guangdong, China: A Community-based Survey

  • Lin, Ying;Shao, Nan;Zhang, Yun-Jian;Wu, Zhuang-Hong;Li, Zhi-Bin;Ren, Ze-Fang;Wang, Shen-Ming
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.6
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    • pp.2759-2763
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    • 2012
  • Objectives: Compared with Western countries, the incidence rates for breast cancer in China are still low. However, breast cancer appears to be hitting Chinese women at a much younger age, with a peak between 40 and 50 years. Furthermore, breast tumors of Asian women have molecular and genetic characteristics that are different from those of Caucasian women. Methods: A community-based study was designed to evaluate the relationship between lifestyles and breast cancer risk in Chinese women residing in Guangzhou. 16,314 subjects completed the questionnaire. Potential confounding factors included sociodemographic characteristics. Results: 33 individuals reported a history of breast cancer, yielding a prevalence rate of 202.3/100000. Associations between subjects' demographic and breast cancer risk factors were assessed. Breast cancer is associated with family history of breast cancer, X-rays received, benign breast disease and hyperlipoidemia or hypercholesteremia with elevated odds ratios. Conclusions: Family history of breast cancer, X-ray received benign breast disease and hyperlipoidemia or hypercholesteremia were significantly associated with risk of breast cancer and may havepotential for breast cancer risk assessment.

Analysis of FHIT Gene Methylation in Egyptian Breast Cancer Women: Association with Clinicopathological Features

  • Zaki, Seham Mahrous;Abdel-Azeez, Hala A.;El Nagar, Mona Roshdy;Metwally, Khaled Abdel-Aziz;Ahmed, Marwa M. Samir S.
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.3
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    • pp.1235-1239
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    • 2015
  • Background: Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which involved in breast cancer pathogenesis. Epigenetics alterations in FHIT contributes to tumorigenesis of breast cancer. Objective: Our objective was to study FHIT promoter region hypermethylation in Egyptian breast cancer patients and its association with clinicopathological features. Materials and Methods: Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction was performed to study the hypermethylation of FHIT promoter region in 20 benign breast tissues and 30 breast cancer tissues. Results: The frequency of hypermethylation of FHIT promoter region was significantly increased in breast cancer patients compared to bengin breast disease patients. The Odd's ratio (95%CI) of development of breast cancer in individuals with FHIT promoter hypermethylation (MM) was 11.0 (1.22-250.8). There were also significant associations between FHIT promoter hypermethylation and estrogen, progesterone receptors negativity, tumor stage and nodal involvment in breast cancer pateints. Conclusions: Our results support an association between FHIT promotor hypermethylation and development of breast cancer in Egyptian breast cancer patients. FHIT promoter hypermethylation is associated with some poor prognostic features of breast cancer.

Survey of Suitable Clothes for Breast Cancer Patients -Changes in Clothing Habits Before and After Surgery- (유방암 절제 수술을 받은 여성의 의복 설계를 위한 의생활 조사 -수술 전과 후의 의생활 변화에 대하여-)

  • Oh, Hee Kyoung
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Clothing and Textiles
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    • v.40 no.3
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    • pp.526-538
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    • 2016
  • Breast cancer surgery result in changes in clothing style due to changes in the size of the breast as well as body shape. This study provides basic data as a fashion therapy to improve the quality of life for breast cancer patients who have to change clothing habits after surgery. The regression results found that the most important factor are pain and the amount of breast loss for clothes style changes after breast cancer surgery. Breast cancer patients suffer pain relative to the proximity to the date of surgery and regardless of the breast cancer resection range. However, the changes in clothes style relates to the amount of pain and breast reduction range. The t-test results on the change of the clothing styles for before and after breast cancer surgery showed that women significantly prefer comfortable clothes with sleeves and consider a closure style on clothes to put on and take off instead of clothes that are tight-fitting, have thin fabric or deep neck lines. Painful breast cancer results in women who prefer closure style on clothes, front closure clothes and garments that hide body shape. However, the larger reduction range of breast cancer patients and those with painful breast cancer prefer garments that hide body shape and are looser size clothes with sleeves.

Clinicopathological and Prognostic Characteristics of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) in Chinese Patients: A Retrospective Study

  • Li, Chun-Yan;Zhang, Sheng;Zhang, Xiao-Bei;Wang, Pei;Hou, Guo-Fang;Zhang, Jin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.6
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    • pp.3779-3784
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    • 2013
  • Aims: To determine the clinical, pathological and prognostic features associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Methods: Clinical and histologic data of 21,749 breast cancer patients who were treated at Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital between July 2002 and December 2011 were collected. Patients were divided into two groups: those with TNBC and those with other types of breast cancer. Patients and tumor characteristics were compared between the two groups using the Chi-square test. The prognostic results of 9,823 patients in the study population were also analyzed to determine long-term survival rates in the two groups of breast cancer patients. Results: Among the breast cancer patients treated in our hospital between 2003 and 2011, 10.4%-13.5% of them had triple-negative breast cancers. Data analyses revealed significant differences in disease onset age, family history of breast cancer, tumor size, tumor histologic grade, lymph note positivity and metastatic status between TNBC and non-TNBC patients. There were also significant differences in 5-year, 7-year and 9-year disease-free and 7-year and 9-year overall survival probability between the groups. Conclusions:TNBC are associated with younger disease onset age, larger tumor size, higher rate of axillary lymph node positivity, and higher tumor histologic grade. TNBC is also related to family history of breast cancer, increased metastatic risk and poor prognosis.

Breast Cancer Knowledge and Screening Behaviour among Women with a Positive Family History: A Cross Sectional Study

  • Subramanian, Pathmawathi;Oranye, Nelson Ositadimma;Masri, Azimah Mohd;Taib, Nur Aishah;Ahmad, Nora
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.11
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    • pp.6783-6790
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    • 2013
  • Background: Breast cancer is the commonest type of cancer among women, and in Malaysia 50-60% of the new cases are being detected at late stages. Do age, education level, income, ethnicity, relationship with breast cancer patients and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors influence breast screening practices? This study revealed interesting but significant differences. Objectives: To assess the knowledge of breast cancer risk factors and early detection measures among women in a high risk group. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional survey of one hundred and thirty one women relatives of breast cancer patients was carried out. Participants were selected through purposive sampling, during hospital visits. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: The majority of the respondents (71%) had poor knowledge of the risk factors for breast cancer. Income, relationship with a patient and practise of breast cancer screening predicted performance of mammography, $R^2$=0.467, F=12.568, p<0.0001. Conclusions: The finding shows inadequate knowledge of breast cancer risk factors and poor cancer screening practise among women with family history of breast cancer. Poor knowledge and practise of breast screening are likely to lead to late stage presentation of breast cancer disease. Some important predictors of breast cancer screening behaviour among women with positive family history of breast cancer were identified. An understanding of the strengths and significance of the association between these factors and breast screening behaviour is vital for developing more targeted breast health promotion.

Predictors of Breast Cancer Screening Uptake: A Pre Intervention Community Survey in Malaysia

  • Dahlui, Maznah;Gan, Daniel Eng Hwee;Taib, Nur Aishah;Pritam, Ranjit;Lim, Jennifer
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.7
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    • pp.3443-3449
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    • 2012
  • Introduction: Despite health education efforts to educate women on breast cancer and breast cancer screening modalities, the incidence of breast cancer and presentation at an advanced stage are still a problem in Malaysia. Objectives: To determine factors associated with the uptake of breast cancer screening among women in the general population. Methods: This pre-intervention survey was conducted in a suburban district. All households were approached and women aged 20 to 60 years old were interviewed with pre-tested guided questionnaires. Variables collected included socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge on breast cancer and screening practice of breast cancer. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. Results: 41.5% of a total of 381 respondents scored above average; the mean knowledge score on causes and risks factors of breast cancer was 3.41 out of 5 (SD1.609). 58.5% had ever practiced BSE with half of them performing it at regular monthly intervals. Uptake of CBE by nurses and by doctors was 40.7% and 37.3%, respectively. Mammogram uptake was 14.6%. Significant predictors of BSE were good knowledge of breast cancer (OR=2.654, 95% CI: 1.033-6.816), being married (OR=2.213, 95% CI: 1.201-4.076) and attending CBE (OR=1.729, 95% CI: 1.122-2.665). Significant predictors for CBE included being married (OR=2.161, 95% CI: 1.174-3.979), good knowledge of breast cancer (OR=2.286, 95% CI: 1.012-5.161), and social support for breast cancer screening (OR=2.312, 95% CI: 1.245-4.293). Women who had CBE were more likely to undergo mammographic screening of the breast (OR=5.744, 95% CI: 2.112-15.623), p<0.005. Conclusion: CBE attendance is a strong factor in promoting BSE and mammography, educating women on the importance of breast cancer screening and on how to conduct BSE. The currently opportunistic conduct of CBE should be extended to active calling of women for CBE.