• Title, Summary, Keyword: Beef Quality

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Beef Usage and Dietitians' Perceptions of Beef Quality in Institutional Foodservice (단체급식소 쇠고기 이용 실태 및 영양사의 쇠고기 품질에 대한 인식)

  • Lee, Kyung-Eun;Joo, Shin-Youn;Yim, Kyung-Sook;Lee, Hong-Mie
    • Journal of the Korean Dietetic Association
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    • v.23 no.2
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    • pp.129-142
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    • 2017
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the usage of beef and foodservice managers' perceptions of beef quality by foodservice type. A survey was conducted on 546 dietitians, and 499 acceptable responses were used for data analysis. By weight, pork was the most used meat in foodservice institutions, followed by poultry and beef. More than half of the foodservices selected meat suppliers by competitive bidding. Approximately 85.8% of the respondents used Hanwoo beef, followed by Australian beef and Youku beef. Beef type differed significantly by foodservice type (P<0.001): most of the schools and social welfare facilities used Hanwoo beef, whereas most hospitals and business/industry operations used Australian beef. When purchasing beef, safety of beef was rated the most important, while eco-friendliness was rated the least important. Most of the dietitians understood that marbling is one of the determinants of the beef quality, but were not aware of other components. Dietitians that selected Hanwoo and Youku beef were more satisfied with quality, taste, nutrition, freshness, country of origin, package, customer, preference, and availability for various menus than those who used imported beef. Dietitians who used Hanwoo beef were the most satisfied with country of origin, whereas the others were the most satisfied with safety. Since the dietitians are in charge of planning menus and selecting meat suppliers at foodservice institutions, they should make knowledgeable decisions by understanding meat supply systems and quality of beef.

Determination of Indicators for Dry Aged Beef Quality

  • Lee, Heeyoung;Jang, Mi;Park, Sunhyun;Jeong, Jiyoun;Shim, You-Shin;Kim, Jong-Chan
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.39 no.6
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    • pp.934-942
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    • 2019
  • Previous studies on dry aged beef, which substantially increases the value of low-grade raw beef and non-preferred cuts, are currently limited to the observation of aged beef changes in laboratory settings or under particular aging conditions, whereas the factors influencing aging have so far been underexplored. Herein, we attempt to establish a technique for distinguishing between fresh and aged beef by observing changes in quality during beef aging. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of time on the quality of aged beef sourced from three Korean manufacturers and identified quality indicators that can be used to distinguish between fresh and aged beef, regardless of supplier. Storage/trimming/aging/cooking losses, moisture/fat/protein/collagen contents, and water holding capacity were tested as potential indicators, among other parameters. As a result, the quality of dry aged beef was shown to be supplier-dependent, which made the identification of factors for the above origin-independent discrimination difficult. Nevertheless, as storage loss, water holding capacity, and cooking loss significantly changed with dry aging time in all cases, these parameters were concluded to be potentially suited for discrimination purposes. The insights gained in this work may help promoting further research in this field and contribute to the development of a standard for consistent aged beef production.

United States beef quality as chronicled by the National Beef Quality Audits, Beef Consumer Satisfaction Projects, and National Beef Tenderness Surveys - A review

  • Gonzalez, John Michael;Phelps, Kelsey Jean
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.7
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    • pp.1036-1042
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    • 2018
  • Meat quality is a very difficult term to define because it means different things to different people. When purchasing beef, consumers in the United States are likely to consider color, price, marbling level, subcutaneous fat trim, or cut thickness when determining the quality of beef. Once consumers have consumed the product, meat quality becomes exponentially more difficult to define due to the subjective nature of this term. Traditionally, tenderness, juiciness, and flavor have been considered the three most important factors that determine the palatability of beef. Therefore, American meat science beef research and industry focus has turned to measuring and quantifying these 3 attributes objectively and subjectively, and to determining what influences them. In reviewing the scientific literature, attempting to meaningfully summarize the findings of the thousands of studies on beef meat quality is impossible due to the inherent differences in the objective and methodology of studies. Fortunately, the United States beef industry and their national trade association, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA), have conducted numerous surveys and audits to characterize the quality of the products being produced and marketed by their cattlemen and the palatability perceptions of their consumers. The data produced by these studies is quite large and impossible to summarize in entirety in this review. Therefore, this review concentrates on the most important attributes that determine the value of a beef carcass and objectively measured and consumer-assessed palatability characteristics of fresh meat from these carcasses from 1987 through 2010.

Effects of Aging and Aging Method on Physicochemical and Sensory Traits of Different Beef Cuts

  • Kim, Minsu;Choe, Juhui;Lee, Hyun Jung;Yoon, Yeongkwon;Yoon, Sungho;Jo, Cheorun
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.54-64
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    • 2019
  • Wet and dry aging methods were applied to improve the quality of three different beef cuts (butt, rump, and sirloin) from Hanwoo cows (quality grade 2, approximately 50-mon-old). After 28 d of wet aging (vacuum packaged; temperature, $2{\pm}1^{\circ}C$) and dry aging (air velocity, 2-7 m/s; temperature, $1{\pm}1^{\circ}C$; humidity, $85{\pm}10%$), proximate composition, cooking loss, water holding capacity, shear force, color, nucleotides content, and sensory properties were compared with a non-aged control (2 d postmortem). Both wet and dry aging significantly increased the water holding capacity of the butt cuts. Dry aging in all beef cuts induced lower cooking loss than that in wet-aged cuts. Shear force of all beef cuts was decreased after both wet and dry aging and CIE $L^*$, $a^*$, and $b^*$ color values in butt and sirloin cuts were higher in both wet and dry aging (p<0.05) groups than those in the non-aged control. Regardless of the aging method used, inosine-5'-monophosphate content among beef cuts was the same. The sensory panel scored significantly higher values in tenderness, flavor, and overall acceptability for dry-aged beef regardless of the beef cuts tested compared to non- and wet-aged cuts. In addition, dry-aged beef resulted in similar overall acceptability among the different beef cuts, whereas that in wet-aged meat was significantly different by different beef cuts. In conclusion, both wet and dry aging improved the quality of different beef cuts; however, dry aging was more suitable for improving the quality of less preferred beef cuts.

Health Implications of Beef Intramuscular Fat Consumption

  • Troy, Declan J.;Tiwari, Brijesh K.;Joo, Seon-Tea
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.36 no.5
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    • pp.577-582
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    • 2016
  • Despite several issues in relation to human health, beef is still a most popular meat product among large section of society due to the presence of high quality protein and other nutrients. The current paper reviews numerous studies that provide nutritional profiles and health implications of high marbled beef consumption. In relation to lipid content of beef, intramuscular fat contains high level of PUFA and MUFA compared to other beef fat. Level and composition of intramuscular fat varies depending on breed and feeding regime. Literature suggests that the marbling is more complex than the development of subcutaneous fat and marbling not only provides good fatty acids but also contributes to the higher eating quality of beef. Finally, the current work emphasize that meat plays a pivotal role in nutritious diets, high quality marbled beef is not only of excellent eating quality but also contain more beneficial fatty acids.

Current situation and future prospects for the Australian beef industry - A review

  • Greenwood, Paul L;Gardner, Graham E;Ferguson, Drewe M
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.7
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    • pp.992-1006
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    • 2018
  • Beef production extends over almost half of Australia, with about 47,000 cattle producers that contribute about 20% ($A12.7 billion gross value of production) of the total value of farm production in Australia. Australia is one of the world's most efficient producers of cattle and was the world's third largest beef exporter in 2016. The Australian beef industry had 25 million head of cattle in 2016-17, with a national beef breeding herd of 11.5 million head. Australian beef production includes pasture-based cow-calf systems, a backgrounding or grow-out period on pasture, and feedlot or pasture finishing. Feedlot finishing has assumed more importance in recent years to assure the eating quality of beef entering the relatively small Australian domestic market, and to enhance the supply of higher value beef for export markets. Maintenance of Australia's preferred status as a quality assured supplier of high value beef produced under environmentally sustainable systems from 'disease-free' cattle is of highest importance. Stringent livestock and meat quality regulations and quality assurance systems, and productivity growth and efficiency across the supply chain to ensure price competiveness, are crucial for continued export market growth in the face of increasing competition. Major industry issues, that also represent research, development and adoption priorities and opportunities for the Australian beef industry have been captured within exhaustive strategic planning processes by the red meat and beef industries. At the broadest level, these issues include consumer and industry support, market growth and diversification, supply chain efficiency, productivity and profitability, environmental sustainability, and animal health and welfare. This review provides an overview of the Australian beef industry including current market trends and future prospects, and major issues and opportunities for the continued growth, development and profitability of the industry.

Quality of steak restructured from beef trimmings containing microbial transglutaminase and impacted by freezing and grading by fat level

  • Sorapukdee, Supaluk;Tangwatcharin, Pussadee
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.129-137
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    • 2018
  • Objective: The objective of this research was to evaluate the physico-chemical, microbiological and sensorial qualities of restructured steaks processed from beef trimmings (grade I and II) and frozen beef (fresh beef as control and frozen beef). Methods: Beef trimmings from commercial butcher were collected, designated into 4 treatments differing in beef trimmings grade and freezing, processed into restructured steaks with 1% microbial transglutaminase and then analyzed for product quality. Results: The results showed that all meat from different groups could be tightly bound together via cross-linking of myosin heavy chain and actin as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Microbial counts of psychrotrophic and mesophilic bacteria were not affected by treatments (p>0.05), and no detectable of thermophilic bacteria were found. Regarding effect of beef trimmings grade, steaks made from beef trimmings grade II (16.03% fat) showed some superior sensorial qualities including higher tenderness score (p<0.05) and tendency for higher scores of juiciness and overall acceptability (p<0.07) than those made from beef trimmings grade I (2.15% fat). Moreover, a hardness value from texture profile analysis was lower in steaks processed from beef trimmings grade II than those made from grade I (p<0.05). Although some inferior qualities in terms of cooking loss and discoloration after cooking were higher in steaks made from beef trimmings grade II than those made from beef trimmings grade I (p<0.05), these differences did not affect the sensory evaluation. Frozen beef improved the soft texture and resulted in effective meat binding as considered by higher cohesiveness and springiness of the raw restructured product as compared to fresh beef (p<0.05). Conclusion: The results indicated the most suitable raw beef for producing restructured steaks without detrimental effect on product quality was beef trimmings grade II containing up to 17% fat which positively affected the sensory quality and that frozen beef trimmings increased tenderness and meat binding of restructured beef steaks.

Comparison of meat quality, fatty acid composition and aroma volatiles of Chikso and Hanwoo beef

  • Utama, Dicky Tri;Lee, Chang Woo;Park, Yeon Soo;Jang, Aera;Lee, Sung Ki
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.31 no.9
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    • pp.1500-1506
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    • 2018
  • Objective: Although Hanwoo has been selected as the superior commercial beef cattle breed in Korea, Chikso (Korean brindle cattle) is still recognized as a valuable breed for beef production. The aim of this study was to compare the meat quality, fatty acid composition and aroma volatiles of beef from Chikso and Hanwoo steers maintained under identical feed management, as information regarding these characteristics is still limited. Methods: A total of 19 carcasses with a quality grade of 1 were selected, and strip loin (longissimus lumborum) cuts were collected from 11 Hanwoo carcasses and 8 Chikso carcasses. Meat quality and aroma analyses were performed at day four postmortem. Results: Though Hanwoo strip loin tended to have higher fat content (15.37%) than Chikso (12.01%), no significant differences were observed. Meat pH, water-holding capacity, cooking loss, shear force value, instrumental surface color (Commission International De L'eclairage $L^{\star}$, $a^{\star}$, $b^{\star}$, chroma, and hue angle) and fatty acid composition were not significantly different. Roasted Chikso beef released more intense aroma than roasted Hanwoo beef based on the total area units of identified volatiles. Among identified volatiles, the amounts of toluene, heptanal, octanal, and nonanal were higher in roasted Chikso beef than in roasted Hanwoo beef. In addition, the aroma pattern of the roasted beef from these breeds was well-discriminated by electronic nose. Conclusion: No distinct differences were found in terms of meat quality between Hanwoo and Chikso beef in this study. However, the aroma pattern and volatiles of roasted Hanwoo and Chikso beef were different according to instrumental analysis.

Effect of Palatability Traits on Satisfactory Level of Korean Beef Consumers (소비자 만족도에 영향을 미치는 한우고기의 관능 특성)

  • Hwang In-Ho
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.310-318
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    • 2004
  • Eating quality is a reflection of consumer satisfaction, while beef quality grade describes carcass characteristics of chiller assessment which are largely influenced by production systems including breeding and feeding schemes. On the other hand, it should be emphasized that high palatability of beef is a function of production and processing components including breed, nutrition, animal handling, post-slaughter intervention and cookery. Numerous efforts have been made by Korean beef industry and research institutes to deliver high quality beef with which domestic beef consumers are satisfied. However, majority of studies have tended to focus on improvement of intramuscular fat content with little attention on its effect on consumer-based eating quality. Furthermore, there is very limited accessible information(if any) on relative importance of eating characteristics (eg, tenderness, juiciness and flavor intensity) to consumer satisfactory rate and palatability grade. On this regard, our recent results indicated, for example, that when m. longissimus was prepared by a thin-slice style BBQ, relative weightings of tenderness, juiciness and flavor intensity for consumer satisfactory rate were 0.4, 0.35 and 0.25, respectively. When eating quality was graded into 4 groups by a sum of tenderness, juiciness and flavor intensity after multiplying these coefficients, consumers responded that the palatability score for high quality beef should be higher than 79 points. Based on our recent experiments, the current report is intended to highlight relative importance of eating quality characteristics on consumer satisfactory rate, and threshold of eating quality grade. In addition, post-slaughter intervention techniques such as electrical stimulation and tenderstretch are given as examples of critical control points of palatability assurance program of Hanwoo beef.

A Study on the Difference in Importance and Performance of DINESERV's 5 Dimensions between Korean Native Cattle Beef and Imported Beef Restaurant

  • Cho, Yoon-Shik;Lee, Mi-Ock
    • Journal of the Korean Data and Information Science Society
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.1165-1172
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    • 2008
  • A considerable amount of research has focused on the dimensionality of service quality construct. To achieve and maintain their comprehensiveness and profitability, restaurant managers should manage and aim to continuously improve the level of service quality offered to their customers. This paper is focused on service quality in the Korean native cattle and imported beef restaurant industry in the Korea. So, this paper has adapted DINESERV scale so that restaurant managers can use it to determine how customers perceive the service quality in Korean native cattle beef restaurant and imported beef restaurant. The purpose of this research is to test the difference in importance and actual performance of 5 dimensions between the restaurants that sell the beef of Korean native cattle and imported cattle. The t-value is used to test difference of the importance and actual performance for DINESERV's 5 dimensions of the 2 restaurant types. But, there is no difference between Korean native cattle and imported beef restaurant.

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