• Title, Summary, Keyword: Baseball catcher

Search Result 3, Processing Time 0.023 seconds

Biomechanical Analysis of Throw Movement to Second Base in High School Elite Baseball Catchers (고등학교 야구 포수의 2루 송구 동작에 대한 운동역학적 분석)

  • Kim, Sung Yong;Park, Jong Chul;Byun, Kyung Seok;Baek, Hee Young
    • Korean Journal of Sport Biomechanics
    • /
    • v.30 no.2
    • /
    • pp.165-172
    • /
    • 2020
  • Objective: The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative and objective data of throwing movement in baseball catcher through biomechanical analysis. Method: Eight high school baseball catchers (age: 17.3±0.7 yrs, height: 175.3±4.5 cm, weight: 82.5±9.0 kg, Career: 7.4±2.1 yrs) participated and 3-dimentional motion capture system and electromyography (EMG) were used in this study. Results: The maximum center of mass position displacement was observed in forward direction. The linear velocity magnitude of the upper extremity segments were showed as "wrist>elbow>shoulder" which is indicative of kinematic chain. For kinetic EMG data, we also observed the greater muscle activation in the left brachioradial and erector spine muscles muscle that during throwing movement. Conclusion: We expect that biomechanical data from this study will provide important training implications to baseball coaches and trainers in order to effectively train their baseball catchers.

3D Modeling of Safety Leg Guards Considering Skin Deformation and shape (피부길이변화를 고려한 3차원 다리보호대 모델링)

  • Lee, Hyojeong;Eom, Ran-i;Lee, Yejin
    • Korean Journal of Human Ecology
    • /
    • v.24 no.4
    • /
    • pp.555-569
    • /
    • 2015
  • During a design process of a protective equipment for sports activities, minimizing movement restrictions is important for enhancing its functions particularly for protection. This study presents a three-dimensional(3D) modeling methodology for designing baseball catcher's leg guards that will allow maximum possible performance, while providing necessary protection. 3D scanning is performed on three positions frequently used by a catcher during the course of a game by putting markings on the subject's legs at 3cm intervals : a standing, a half squat with knees bent to 90 degrees and 120 degrees of knee flexion. Using data obtained from the 3D scan, we analyzed the changes in skin length, radii of curvatures, and cross-sectional shapes, depending on the degree of knee flexion. The results of the analysis were used to decide an on the ideal segmentation of the leg guards by modeling posture. Knee flexions to 90 degrees and to $120^{\circ}$ induced lengthwise extensions than a standing. In particular, the vertical length from the center of the leg increases to a substantially higher degree when compared to those increased from the inner and the outer side of the leg. The degree of extension is varied by positions. Therefore, the leg guards are segmented at points where the rate of increase changed. It resulted in a three-part segmentation of the leg guards at the thigh, the knee, and the shin. Since the 120 degree knee-flexion posture can accommodate other positions as well, the related 3D data are used for modeling Leg Guard (A) with the loft method. At the same time, Leg Guard (B) was modeled with two-part segmentation without separating the knee and the shin as in existing products. A biomechanical analysis of the new design is performed by simulating a 3D dynamic analysis. The analysis revealed that the three-part type (A) leg guards required less energy from the human body than the two-part type (B).

Development of Ergonomic Leg Guard for Baseball Catchers through 3D Modeling and Printing

  • Lee, Hyojeong;Eom, Ran-i;Lee, Yejin
    • Journal of Fashion Business
    • /
    • v.20 no.3
    • /
    • pp.17-29
    • /
    • 2016
  • To develop baseball catcher leg guards, 3-dimensional (3D) methodologies, which are 3D human body data, reverse engineering, modeling, and printing, optimized guard design for representative positions. Optimization was based on analysis of 3D body surface data and subjective evaluation using 3D printing products. Reverse engineering was used for analysis and modeling based on data in three postures: standing, $90^{\circ}$ knee flexion, and $120^{\circ}$ knee flexion. During knee flexion, vertical skin length increased, with the thigh and knee larger in anterior area compared to the horizontal dimension. Moreover, $120^{\circ}$ knee flexion posture had a high radius of curvature in knee movement. Therefore, guard designs were based on increasing rates of skin deformation and numerical values of radius of curvature. Guards were designed with 3-part zoning at the thigh, knee, and shin. Guards 1 and 2 had thigh and knee boundaries allowing vertical skin length deformation because the shape of thigh and knee significantly affects to its performance. Guard 2 was designed with a narrower thigh and wider knee area than guard 1. The guards were manufactured as full-scale products on a 3D printer. Both guards fit better in sitting than standing position, and guard 2 received better evaluations than guard 1. Additional modifications were made and an optimized version (guard 3) was tested. Guard 3 showed the best fit. A design approach based on 3D data effectively determines best fitting leg guards, and 3D printing technology can customize guard design through immediate feedback from a customer.