• Title, Summary, Keyword: Arab countries

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Gynecological Cancer Services in Arab Countries: Present Scenario, Problems and Suggested Solutions

  • Ortashi, Osman;Al Kalbani, Moza
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.2147-2150
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    • 2013
  • Gynecological malignancies account for 9% of all female cancers worldwide. In the Arab countries Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women followed by cervical cancer. Ovarian cancer ranks as fourth leading cancer in women. There are huge differences in the available resources among Arab countries. However the challenges facing the provision of gynecological cancers services shared similarities like the cultural and religious background. Most of the gynecological cancers are diagnosed at a later stage in Arab countries due to the lack of reproductive health awareness especially among older women combined with the cultural stigma of seeking medical advice for gynecological symptoms. This article discusses the current situation of gynecological cancer services in Arab countries and suggests some practical solutions.

Colorectal Cancer in the Arab World - Screening Practices and Future Prospects

  • Arafa, Mostafa A;Farhat, Karim
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.17
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    • pp.7425-7430
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    • 2015
  • Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates have dropped 30% in the US in the last 10 years among adults ages 50 and older due to the widespread uptake of colonoscopy, yet incidences in the Arab countries have been increasing in the past ten years, albeit with lower figures when compared with developed countries. Lifestyle changes, food consumption patterns and obesity have been observed during the past years where the regular consumption of traditional foods is being replaced with more Western-style and ready-made foods. Most high income countries have implemented population based colorectal cancer screening programs, which aid in decreasing the incidence and mortality of cancer, while these are lacking in most of the Arab world countries due to many cultural and religious barriers to CRC screening as well as lack of high education or familiarity. What is needed is health education to modify risky lifestyle, and to increase motives and enhance positive attitudes towards early screening especially amongst high risk groups in addition to policy designed to encourage healthier living.

REINSTATEMENT OF LONG-DISTANCE INTERNATIONAL TRADE AFTER THE ARAB CONQUEST: THE KHAZAR-ARAB PARTNERSHIP ON THE SILK ROAD IN THE 9-10th CENTURIES

  • ASADOV, FARDA
    • Acta Via Serica
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    • v.1 no.1
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    • pp.33-50
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    • 2016
  • The article studies the new situation in international long distance trade after the emergence of new superpower - Arab Caliphate - in Eurasian overland tracks of the Great Silk Road. The stages of Arab advancement along trade routes and outcomes of their contestation with the strong tribal confederations of Turkic nomads in Central Asia and the Caucasus are highlighted. A special focus is made upon the relationship of Arabs with Khazar Turks who have endured severe clashes with strongest army of the time in the region. Khazar kingdom survived and even expanded its control over the tracks of international trade in the western part of Eurasia. The research describes the way how trade partnership between Arabs and Turks was shaped in the aftermath of military clashes. Existing scholarly views on the role of Khazar in Silk Road are reviewed and unattended evidence of Arab sources are involved to support concluding points that Khazar state managed to consolidate various actors for maintenance of international trade such as so called Rus warriors and merchants in the west of Volga, nomadic tribes in Eurasian steppes, and Jewish trading gild named ar-rahdaniyya in Arab sources. It is asserted that Khazar state since the second half of 9th century through its decline in mid 10th century not only served as transit space for goods of exporting countries but also exported goods of its own crafts and natural resources.

Burden of Virus-associated Liver Cancer in the Arab World, 1990-2010

  • Khan, Gulfaraz;Hashim, M. Jawad
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.265-270
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    • 2015
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is amongst the top three cancer causes of death worldwide with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV) as the main etiological agents. An up-to-date descriptive epidemiology of the burden of HBV/HCV-associated HCC in the Arab world is lacking. We therefore determined the burden of HBV/HCV-associated HCC deaths in the Arab world using the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 dataset. GBD 2010 provides, for the first time, deaths specifically attributable to viral-associated HCC. We analyzed the data for the 22 Arab countries by age, sex and economic status from 1990 to 2010 and compared the findings to global trends. Our analysis revealed that in 2010, an estimated 752,101 deaths occurred from HCC worldwide. Of these 537,093 (71%) were from HBV/HCV-associated HCC. In the Arab world, 17,638 deaths occurred from HCC of which 13,558 (77%) were HBV/HCV-linked. From 1990 to 2010, the burden of HBV and HCV-associated HCC deaths in the Arab world increased by 137% and 216% respectively, compared to global increases of 62% and 73%. Age-standardized death rates also increased in most of the Arab countries, with the highest rates noted in Mauritania and Egypt. Male gender and low economic status correlated with higher rates. These findings indicate that the burden of HBV/HCV-associated HCC in the Arab world is rising at a much faster rate than rest of the world and urgent public health measures are necessary to abate this trend and diminish the impact on already stretched regional healthcare systems.

Addressing Factors Associated with Arab Women's Socioeconomic Status May Reduce Breast Cancer Mortality: Report from a Well Resourced Middle Eastern Country

  • Donnelly, Tam Truong;Al Khater, Al-Hareth;Al Kuwari, Mohamed Ghaith;Al-Bader, Salha Bujassoum;Abdulmalik, Mariam;Al-Meer, Nabila;Singh, Rajvir;Fung, Tak
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.15
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    • pp.6303-6309
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    • 2015
  • Differences in socioeconomic status (SES) such as income levels may partly explain why breast cancer screening (BCS) disparities exist in countries where health care services are free or heavily subsidized. However, factors that contribute to such differences in SES among women living in well resourced Middle East countries are not fully understood. This quantitative study investigated factors that influence SES and BCS of Arab women. Understanding of such factors can be useful for the development of effective intervention strategies that aim to increase BCS uptake among Arab women. Using data from a cross-sectional survey among 1,063 Arabic-speaking women in Qatar, age 35+, additional data analysis was performed to determine the relationship between socioeconomic indicators such as income and other factors in relation to BCS activities. This study found that income is determined and influenced by education level, occupation, nationality, years of residence in the country, level of social activity, self-perceived health status, and living area. Financial stress, unemployment, and unfavorable social conditions may impede women's participation in BCS activities in well resourced Middle East countries.

Lost in Translation? Challenges and Opportunities for Raising Health and Safety Awareness among a Multinational Workforce in the United Arab Emirates

  • Loney, Tom;Cooling, Robert Fletcher;Aw, Tar-Ching
    • Safety and Health at Work
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    • v.3 no.4
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    • pp.298-304
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    • 2012
  • The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has experienced tremendous economic and industrial growth in the petroleum, airline, maritime and construction sectors, especially since the discovery of oil reserves. Mass recruitment of low skilled or unskilled laborers from less-developed countries has been utilized to satisfy the manpower demands of these fast paced industrial developments. Such workforce recruitment has created an unusual populace demographic, with the total UAE population estimated at 8.3 million, composed of 950,000 Emiratis, with the remainder being multinational expatriate workers, with varying educational qualifications, work experience, religious beliefs, cultural practices, and native languages. These unique characteristics pose a challenge for health and safety professionals tasked with ensuring the UAE workforce adheres to specific occupational health and safety procedures. The paper discusses two case studies that employ a novel multimedia approach to raising health and safety awareness among a multinational workforce.

Predicting Arab Consumers' Preferences on the Korean Contents Distribution

  • Park, Young-Eun;Chaffar, Soumaya;Kim, Myoung-Sook;Ko, Hye-Young
    • The Journal of Distribution Science
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.33-40
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    • 2017
  • Purpose - This study aims to examine the analysis of pattern on Arab countries consumers' preferences of the Korean Contents using social media, Facebook since Korean entertainment contents have been distributed in the global marketplace. Then we focus on developing Predictive model using a Data Mining Technique. Research design, data and methodology - In order to understand preference growth of Korean contents in Arabic countries, we- collected data from two popular Facebook pages: 'Korean movies and drama' and 'K-pop'. Then, we adopted a data-driven approach based on Data Mining techniques. Results - It is obvious that the number of likes for K-pop will increase for all North African and Middle Eastern countries, however concerning Korean Movies and Drama except Tunisia it is decreasing for Algeria, Egypt and Morocco. Also, concerning Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates, the number of likes will decrease for Korean Movies and Drama which is not the case for Iraq. Conclusions - It is noted in this study that K-contents such as drama, movie and music are sometimes a gateway to a wider interest in Korean culture, food and brands. Moreover, this study gives significant implications for developing predictive model to forecast Korean contents' consumption and preferences.

Factors Influencing Overall Satisfaction of Middle Eastern Arab Patients in South Korea

  • Al-Farajat, Loai;Jung, Seong-Hoon;Gu, Gil-hwan;Seo, Young-Joon
    • International Journal of Advanced Culture Technology
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.216-224
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    • 2019
  • The number of patients from Middle Eastern Arabic countries is steadily increasing in respect to the South Korean government's medical tourism strategies. Word of mouth is one of the main determinants concerning the Middle Eastern Arab patients' medical tourism destination. Further, patients' satisfaction affects repurchase and revisit intention. This study aimed to measure the level of Middle Eastern Arab patients' satisfaction, and to measure the effect of different medical factors on satisfaction in such patients who are seeking medical attention in South Korea. A 110 Middle Eastern Arab patients who visited South Korea for medical purposes participated in our survey between November, 2016 and April, 2017. All factors had a high mean (${\geq}4.24$; ${\geq}84.8/100$) except for one factor (hospital halal meals (3.82; 76.4)). To identify factors influencing participants' overall satisfaction we used multiple regression analysis. Physicians, interpreters, and halal meals were the main factors influencing overall Middle Eastern Arab patients' satisfaction. Physicians and interpreters in Korea are recommended to be oriented to basic Islamic beliefs and Middle Eastern Arab patients' behavior. Daily communication, such as speaking directly to the patient, limiting important issues to two or three at a time, and translating sentence by sentence, could help to improve Middle Eastern Arab patients' satisfaction. Enlisting Middle Eastern nutrition specialists in medical institutions in South Korea may substantially improve non-medical services satisfaction such as halal food and dietary restrictions.

A revival of primary healing hypotheses: a comparison of traditional healing approaches of Arabs and American Indians

  • El-Magboub, Asma;Garcia, Cecilia;James, Adams David Jr.
    • CELLMED
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.4.1-4.13
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    • 2012
  • When medicine is unable to cure, and the end becomes imminent, or when the patient is tired of the side effects associated with chronic use of drugs, the search for alternative and new ways of healing is begun. Coincidentally, sometimes the alternative is the origin, as is the case for traditional Arab medicine and traditional American Indian healing. Traditional healing is the first healing that all people have used for 200,000 years, since the beginning of Homo sapiens. The sources and elements of traditional Arab medicine have been examined in books and by consulting with traditional Arab healers. Arabic medicine is a career combining both elements of science and philosophy based on religion and traditions, and includes a diversity of healing approaches: spiritual, physical, and using natural products. These approaches are discussed with emphasis on wet cupping (Alhijamah), a practice that is undergoing a revival nowadays in Arab countries. American Indian healing is a career based on religion, tradition, an innate healing gift and extensive training, both in a medical school setting and as an apprentice. Arabic healing approaches are compared to American Indian healing approaches.

Comments on waste to energy technologies in the United Arab Emirates (UAE)

  • Shareefdeen, Zarook;Youssef, Norhan;Taha, Ahmed;Masoud, Catherine
    • Environmental Engineering Research
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    • v.25 no.1
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    • pp.129-134
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    • 2020
  • The main reason that drives many developing countries to pursue waste-to-energy (WtE) technologies is that it produces energy while eliminating build-up of large quantities of wastes, at a time, when oil and gas reserves are declining. The rate of generation of municipal solid wastes (MSW) in any given country depends on many factors including economy, population, and modernization of industry and infrastructure developments. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates that has grown to be one of the Middle East's most important economic centers. UAE has also become one of the highest waste producing countries due to fast development and growth; thus, UAE pursue modern technologies to covert generated wastes into energy. In this communication, the status of on-going waste to energy projects and WtE plants that are currently under design and construction in UAE are discussed. The need for development of WtE technologies is presented based on the literature, reports, economics and the environmental regulations.