• Title, Summary, Keyword: Animal carcass

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Effect of Carcass Weight on Physicochemical and Sensory Traits of Duck Meat (오리 도체중량이 오리고기의 이화학적 특성 및 관능특성에 미치는 영향)

  • Kim, Yun Seok;Kim, Jin Hyung;Cho, Soo Hyun;Kang, Sun Moon;Kang, Geun Ho;Seo, Hyun Woo;Ba, Hoa Van
    • Korean Journal of Poultry Science
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    • v.45 no.3
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    • pp.137-145
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    • 2018
  • This study was carried out to investigate the effect of carcass weight on the physicochemical and sensory traits of duck meat. In total, 150 duck carcasses were divided into five different weight groups. The fat content in both breast and leg meats tended to increase with increased carcass weight. The cooking loss was significantly higher in the <2,200 g weight group and decreased with increased carcass weight. There was no significant difference in pH, water-holding capacity, lightness, or redness among carcass weight groups. The shear force was significantly higher in the ${\geq}2,800g$ weight group. The oleic acid (C18:1, n9) content in both the breast and leg meats tended to increase with increased carcass weight. The unsaturated fatty acid content in the breast meats was similar for all the groups whereas its content in the leg meats increased with increased weight groups. There was no significant difference in the sensory scores among the treatments. Taken together, it may be said that the carcass weight had minor effects on the physicochemical traits of duck meat. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of different carcass weights in the same raising period on duck meat quality.

Prediction of Retail Beef Yield Using Parameters Based on Korean Beef Carcass Grading Standards

  • Choy, Yun-Ho;Choi, Seong-Bok;Jeon, Gi-Jun;Kim, Hyeong-Cheol;Chung, Hak-Jae;Lee, Jong-Moon;Park, Beom-Young;Lee, Sun-Ho
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.30 no.6
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    • pp.905-909
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    • 2010
  • Two sets of data on carcass traits and beef cut parameters were used to investigate the relationships between carcass and beef cut measurements, which can be used to make predictions of retail cut percentages. One set had a total of 1,141 measurements of Hanwoo cattle of three different sex origins, which were slaughtered in an abattoir located at the National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Korea from 1996 to 2008. To develop prediction models for retail cut percentage with higher accuracies than the current model, another set consisting of a total of 13,389 records of carcass and beef cut traits were collected from 30 abattoirs and butcheries in Korea from 2008 to 2009. Bulls yielded heavier and leaner carcasses than steers. High correlation coefficients were estimated between amount of body fat and percent retail cut (-0.82) as well as between back fat thickness (BF) and percent retail cut (-0.62). The amount of retail cut, however, was highly correlated with body weight before slaughter (BW, 0.95) or with cold carcass weight (CWT, 0.94). Relationships between percent retail cut and measurable beef yield traits, BF, loin eye area (LEA) or CWT varied by sex class, which must be considered for development of a prediction model with high accuracy. Models of data for all breeds and sexes fit the effects of breed, sex, and interaction of abattoir by butchers, whereas models of data for each breed and sex fit the effect of interaction of abattoir by butcher only. Due to possible future changes in back fat control, we performed a log transformation of BF. Our new models fit better than the currently used model.

Genetic Analysis of Ultrasound and Carcass Measurement Traits in a Regional Hanwoo Steer Population

  • Hwang, Jeong Mi;Cheong, Jae Kyoung;Kim, Sam Su;Jung, Bong Hwan;Koh, Myung Jae;Kim, Hyeong Cheol;Choy, Yun Ho
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.4
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    • pp.457-463
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    • 2014
  • Ultrasound measurements of backfat thickness (UBF), longissimus muscle area (ULMA) and marbling score (UMS) and carcass measurements of carcass weight (CW), backfat thickness (BF), longissimus muscle area (LMA), and marbling score (MS) on 7,044 Hanwoo steers were analyzed to estimate genetic parameters. Data from Hanwoo steers that were raised, finished in Hoengseong-gun, Gangwon-do (province) and shipped to slaughter houses during the period from October 2010 to April 2013 were evaluated. Ultrasound measurements were taken at approximately three months before slaughter by an experienced operator using a B-mode real-time ultrasound device (HS-2000, FHK Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) with a 3.5 MHz linear probe. Ultrasound scanning was on the left side between 13th rib and the first lumbar vertebrae. All slaughtering processes and carcass evaluations were performed in accordance with the guidelines of beef grading system of Korea. To estimate genetic parameters, multiple trait animal models were applied. Fixed effects included in the models were: the effects of farm, contemporary group effects (year-season at the time of ultrasound scanning in the models for UBF, ULMA, and UMS, and year-season at slaughter in the models for CW, BF, LMA, and MS), the effects of ultrasound technicians as class variables and the effects of the age in days at ultrasound scanning or at slaughtering as linear covariates, respectively for ultrasound and carcass measures. Heritability estimates obtained from our analyses were 0.37 for UBF, 0.13 for ULMA, 0.27 for UMS, 0.44 for CW, 0.33 for BF, 0.36 for LMA and 0.54 MS, respectively. Genetic correlations were strongly positive between corresponding traits of ultrasound and carcass measures. Genetic correlation coefficient between UBF and BF estimate was 0.938, between ULMA and LMA was 0.767 and between UMS and MS was 0.925. These results suggest that ultrasound measurement traits are genetically similar to carcass measurement traits.

GROWTH AND COMPOSITION OF THE OMANI DHOFARI CATTLE 2. DISTRIBUTION OF CARCASS TISSUES

  • Mahgoub, O.;Olvey, F.H.;Jeffrey, D.C.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.8 no.6
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    • pp.617-625
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    • 1995
  • Distribution of wholesale carcass cuts and tissues was studied in Omani Dhofari bulls and steers raised under intensive management and slaughtered over a range of 110 to 210 kg body weight. The fore quarter of Dhofari cattle carcasses was heavier than the hind quarter with the chuck being the heaviest cut in the half carcass followed by the round whereas the flank was the lightest cut. Proportions of the fore quarter and its cuts increased whereas that of the hind quarter and its cuts decreased with increasing carcass weight. The fore quarter contained higher proportions of carcass tissues especially intermuscular fat than the hind quarter. The chuck and round contained the highest proportions of lean and bone and the flank the least. There was a general trend of increasing proportions of fat and decreasing proportions of lean and bone in carcass cuts and fore and hind quarters with increasing slaughter weight and age. As % total body fat (TBF), total carcass fat (TCF) increased whereas total non-carcass fat (TNCF) decreased. The largest proportion of TBF was deposited in the intermuscular site. Among the TNCF depots, the kidney and omental contributed the highest proportions whereas the pelvic and channel were the lowest. Proportions of M. rhomboideus and M. splenius increased in the half carcass whereas that of M. semitendinosus decreased as the cattle increased in size. The axial skeleton contributed 47.4-51.1, the fore limb 21.6-22.6 and the hind limb 23.9-26.2% of the total carcass bone. Proportions of axial skeleton increased whereas that of fore and hind limbs decreased with increasing slaughter weight and age. There were no major effects of castration on the distribution of weight of carcass cuts or carcass tissues. Steers had higher total body fat at 160 kg body weight and higher proportions of mesenteric, scrotal, pelvic, kidney and total non-carcass fat at 210 kg weight than bulls. As % of total body fat, steers fad significantly higher kidney and total non-carcass fat. There was little effects of castration on proportions of dimensions of individual muscles or bones.

A STANDARD METHOD FOR JOINTING CAMEL CARCASSES WITH REFERENCE TO THE EFFECT OF SLAUGHTER AGE ON CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS IN NAJDI CAMELS. 3. PARTITION AND DISTRIBUTION OF CARCASS FAT

  • Abouheif, M.A.;Basmaeil, S.M.;Bakkar, M.N.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.4 no.3
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    • pp.219-225
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    • 1991
  • The influence of age on the relative growth patterns of subcutaneous, intermuscular, intramuscular, perirenal, channel and hump fat in relation to the total fat weight in carcass sides of 18 Najdi male camels averaging 8, 16 and 26 months of age has been investigated. The total fat weight in a carcass side increased (p<.01) from 17.3% to 27.1% as the camel age increased from 8 to 26 months. However, at all ages studied, intermuscular fat weight was the largest fat depot, followed, in order, by subcutaneous and intramuscular fat. The change in weight of the intramuscular, intermuscular and subcutaneous fat between 8 and 26 months of age was greater, reaching 6.7, 4.3 and 4 times respectively, than the hump, channel and perirenal fat weight which increased by 3.6, 2.5 and 2.3 times, respectively. The allometric growth coefficient (${\beta}$) for intramuscular fat in relation to the total carcass fat weight was the highest, followed, in order, by intermuscular, subcutaneous, hump, channel and perirenal fat.

Effect of Levels of Concentrate Supplement on Live Weight Gain and Carcass Characteristics in Sheep on Restricted Grazing

  • Mazumder, M.A.R.;Hossain, M.M.;Akhter, S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.11 no.1
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    • pp.17-20
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    • 1998
  • Sixteen local sheep (8 male + 8 female) of about six months old with average live weight 10.78 $({\pm}1.11)$ kg were allocated into four treatments. The treatments (T) are : $T_0$ = Restricted grazing without concentrate; $T_1$, $T_2$ and $T_3$ = Grazing + 100, 200 and 300 g concentrate per sheep daily. Live weight of grazing (7.30 hrs daily) sheep was recorded in each week. The uncastrated male sheep were slaughtered for carcass and non-carcass parameters. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed in live weight gain (g/day) among the treatments ($T_0=15.71$; $T_1=22.66$; $T_2 =32.66$ and $T_3=40.47$). The dressing % were : ($T_0=32.75$, $T_1=38.50$, $T_2=36.90 $ and $T_3=37.75$). The warm carcass weight represented 37.21% of live weight. Significant (p < 0.01) correlation were observed for live weight with carcass weight (r = 0.99) and dressing % (r = 0.88). Concentrate supplement increase live weight gain in sheep on grazing. Live weight is a good indicator to assess carcass characteristics.

Effect of Sex on Carcass and Meat Characteristics of New Zealand White Rabbits Aged 11 Weeks

  • Yalcin, S.;Onbasilar, E.E.;Onbasilar, I.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.8
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    • pp.1212-1216
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    • 2006
  • This experiment was conducted to determine and compare some characteristics of the meat and carcass of rabbits aged 11 weeks according to sex. In the experiment thirty male and thirty female New Zealand White rabbits were slaughtered. The weights and percentages of cold carcasses, skin with head and limbs, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fore legs, hind legs, breast and ribs, loin and abdominal wall were recorded. The values for carcass length, lumbar circumference, pH in the muscles of Biceps femoris and Longissimus dorsi, meat to bone ratio and cooking loss were also determined. The mean values for cold carcass weight and cold dressing percentage were 832 g and 48.77% in male and 849 g and 48.69% in female, respectively. In this study no significant differences were shown between male and female rabbits in the characteristics of carcass and meat except the value of pH of Longissimus dorsi muscle which was markedly higher in males than that in females meat. Slaughter weight was positively correlated with the weights of carcass, skin with head and limbs, lung, liver, kidney, heart and weights of joints (p<0.01) and dressing percentage (p<0.05).

THE MEASUREMENT OF FAT THICKNESS IN LIVE CATTLE WITH AN ULTRASONIC DEVICE AS A PREDICTOR OF CARCASS COMPOSITION

  • Mitsuhashi, T.;Mitsumoto, M.;Yamashita, Y.;Ozawa, S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.3 no.4
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    • pp.263-267
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    • 1990
  • The fat thicknesses of twenty-eight Japanese Black beef steers were measured with an ultrasonic device at eleven points on the cattle prior to slaughter and side dissection. The relation between live fat thickness and both weight and percentage of fat and lean in the carcass was examined. Fat thickness obtained from nine points of the chest, flank and rump regions was found to relate significantly (P<0.01) to both weight and percentage of fat. However, shoulder fat thickness measurements were not significantly related to the weight or percentage of fat or lean in the carcass. Addition of live fat thickness to animal age or live weight as an independent variable markedly improved the precision of multiple regression equations for predicting weight of fat and lean, and percentage of fat. In predicting the percentage of lean, both animal age and body weight were not employed in the multiple regression equation. The residual standard deviation for predicting percentage of fat and lean were 1.93 and 1.87, respectively. The ultrasonic measurement of fat thickness if supposed to be useful to the prediction of carcass composition of beef cattle.

Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV) from animal carcass disposal sites using real-time RT-PCR

  • Miguel, Michelle;Kim, Seon-Ho;Lee, Sang-Suk;Cho, Yong-Il
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Service
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    • v.43 no.2
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    • pp.107-112
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    • 2020
  • Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and avian influenza (AI) are highly pathogenic viral disease which affects the livestock industry worldwide. Outbreak of these viruses causes great impact in the livestock industry; thus, disease infected animals were immediately disposed. Burial is the commonly used disposal method for deceased animals. However, there is potential for secondary environmental contamination, as well as the risk that infectious agents persisting in the environment due to the limited environmental controls in livestock burial sites during the decomposition of the carcasses. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the detection of FMD and AI viruses from animal carcass disposal sites using real-time reverse transcription PCR. Soil samples of more than three years post-burial from livestock carcass disposal sites were collected and processed RNA isolation using a commercial extraction kit. The isolated RNA of the samples was used for the detection of FMDV and AIV using qRT-PCR. Based on the qPCR assay result, no viral particle was detected in the soil samples collected from the animal disposal sites. This indicates that 3 years of burial and their carcass disposal method is efficient for the control or at least reduction of spread infections in the surrounding environment.

EFFECT OF FEEDING CLOMIPHENE CITRATE ON CARCASS COMPOSITION OF BROILER

  • Ali, M.A.;Shingari, B.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.2 no.1
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    • pp.17-21
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    • 1989
  • Four seasonal trials were conducted to study the effect of feeding clomiphene citrate on carcass composition of broilers. It was fed at 5, 10, 15 mg levels per kg feed for a period of two weeks, 3-4 weeks ($S_1$), 4-5 weeks ($S_2$) and 5-6 weeks ($S_3$) of age. Total carcasses were analysed for moisture, ether extract and protein. Clomiphene citrate significantly decreased the moisture with concomitant increase in ether extract content of the carcasses at all the ages and seasons. Carcass protein was significantly decreased at all the ages and seasons. The responses in the different level of clomiphene citrate is dose dependent. The carcass moisture decreased with age while protein and ether extract contents increased in all seasons. The females had more ether extract and less moisture contents than male. The carcass ether extract was higher in summer and rainy seasons followed by spring and winter seasons, and the differences were significant. A concomitant significant decrease of carcass moisture was observed. The effect of seasons on carcass protein varied at different ages but there appeared to be a trend towards decreasing carcass protein in summer and rainy seasons than winter and spring seasons.