• Title, Summary, Keyword: Angelica dahurica

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Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of the aqueous extract of Angelica dahurica

  • Choi, In-Ho;Song, Yun-Kyung;Lim, Hyung-Ho
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.29 no.2
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    • pp.32-40
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    • 2008
  • Background: Angelica dahurica has been used in various clinical cases. Its taste is hot and its property is warm, dry and nonpoisonous. Its efficacy is to remove wind-damp, cure swelling and edema, exhaust pus, stop itching, rhinitis and leukorrhea. Object: To test through experiment Angelica dahurica's analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy. Method: Inject acetic acid as a pain-inducing substance to the mice and measure visceral pain bywrithing reflex. Inject carrageenan that is an edema-inducing substance to the rat's paw and measure volume of edema. Take thermal pain to mice with plantar test and measure paw withdrawal latency. Normal group is non Angelica dahurica-treated group and treated group is Angelica dahurica-treated group. Results: In acetic acid-induced visceral model, treatment with Angelica dahurica suppressed writhing reflex significantlyand dose-dependently. In carrageenan-induced paw edema model, treatment with Angelica dahurica suppressed carrageenan-induced paw edema. In plantar test model, no significant effect on the withdrawal latency of thermal stimulation-induced nociception was observed. Conclusion: Angelica dahurica has analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy.

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Two Minor Furanocoumarins of Angelica dahurica

  • Shin, Kuk-Hyun;Moon, Ki-Ho;Woo, Woo-Sick
    • Archives of Pharmacal Research
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.165-166
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    • 1991
  • Two minor constituents were isolated from the roots of Angelica dahurica and identified as isooxypeucedanin and gosferol, respectively.

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Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of the aqueous extract of root of Angelica Dahurica

  • Choi, In-Ho;Lim, Hyung-Ho;Song, Yun-Kyung;Lee, Jin-Woo;Kim, Young-Sick;Ko, Il-Gyu;Kim, Ki-Jeong;Shin, Mal-Soon;Kim, Khae-Hawn;Kim, Chang-Ju
    • Advances in Traditional Medicine
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    • v.7 no.5
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    • pp.527-533
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    • 2008
  • Angelica dahurica (Umbelliferae) grows in China, Japan, Russia, and Korea. The root of Angelica dahurica has been used as a traditional folk medicine to treat headache and toothache. In this study, the effects of the aqueous extract of Angelica dahurica on acetic acid-induced abdominal pain, carrageenan-induced edema, and thermal hyperalgesia were investigated using mice and rats. The present results showed that the aqueous extract of Angelica dahurica inhibited acetic acidinduced abdominal pain in mice and reduced carrageen-induced edema in rats. The present study showed that the aqueous extract of Angelica dahurica possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.

Antioxidant properties of Angelica dahurica extracts fermented by probiotics strains isolated from gimchi

  • Ji, Joong Gu;Yoo, Sun Kyun
    • Journal of the Korean Applied Science and Technology
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    • v.35 no.4
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    • pp.1276-1284
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    • 2018
  • probiotics strains promoting the health are a collection of microorganisms that improve or restore microbial populations in the intestines. In this study, Leuconostoc probiotics was isolated from fermented gimchi and identified. Angelica dahurica, containing abundantly antioxidant activity, imperator, is a wildly grown species of angelica native. Before fermentation, total phenolics compound were $48.83{\pm}4.9GAE\;mg/g$ in the Angelica dahurica extract. After fermentation total phenolic compounds were $97.7{\pm}12.6GAE\;mg/g$. The total amount of phenol in the fermented product was 30.2% higher than that before fermentation. The total flavonoid content before fermentation was $9.86{\pm}4.3mg/g$ and the total flavonoid content was $37.17{\pm}7.4mg/g$ after fermentation, which was 82.3% higher than before fermentation. The DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, hydroxy radical scavenging activity and $Fe^{{+}{+}}$ chelating antioxidative activity of the Angelica dahurica extract were $41.6{\pm}7.1%$, $65.7{\pm}8.4%$, $55.26{\pm}9.4%$ and $17.5{\pm}4.6%$, respectively. After fermentation, they were $60.3{\pm}12.6%$, $78.8{\pm}8.3%$, $56.9{\pm}4.9%$ and $36.6{\pm}8.9%$, respectively. Therefore, the present study suggests that the fermentation using the probiotics strain of the Angelica dahurica extract can be used as a functional health food and cosmetic material with increased antioxidant capacity.

A New Coumarin from the Stem of Angelica dahurica

  • Kim, Chang-Min;Kwon, Yong-Soo;Shin, Soo-Jung;Kim, Myong-Jo
    • Archives of Pharmacal Research
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    • v.25 no.1
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    • pp.53-56
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    • 2002
  • One new and three known coumarins were isolated from the $CHCl_3$ soluble fraction of Angelica dahurica stem. On the basis of spectral data, the structures of the isolated compounds were determined to be scopoletin, angelol I, angelol H and 6-[(1S), 2(R)-2, 3-dihydroxy-1-methoxy-3-methylbutyl]-7-methoxycoumarin; the latter being isolated for the first time from a plant source.

Coumarin Glycosides from the Roots of Angelica dahurica

  • Kim, Seoung-Han;Kang, Sam-Sik;Kim, Chang-Min
    • Archives of Pharmacal Research
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.73-77
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    • 1992
  • From the roots of Angelica dahurica Bentham et Hooker (Umbelliferae), five coumarin glucosides together with adenosine have been isolated and identified as nodakenin, 3'-hydroxymarmesinin, tert-O-$\beta$-D-glucopyranosyl-byakangelicin, sec-O-$\beta$-D-glucopyranosyl-byakangelicin and scopolin. This is the first report of the occurrence of these compounds in this plant.

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Coumarin Glycosides from the Roots of Angelica dahurica (구릿대 뿌리의 Coumarin 배당체(2))

  • Kwon, Yong-Soo;Kim, Chang-Min
    • Korean Journal of Pharmacognosy
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    • v.23 no.4
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    • pp.221-224
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    • 1992
  • From the roots of Angelica dahurica Bentham et Hooker(Umbelliferae), three coumarin glycosides have been isolated and identified as skimmin, $8-O-{\beta}-D-glucopyranosyl$ xanthotoxol and $tert.-O-{\beta}-D-glucopyranosyl-heralenol$. $8-O-{\beta}-D-Glucopyranosyl-xanthotoxol$ was isolated for the first time from plant source.

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Pharmacological Activities of Water Extracts of Umbelliferae Plants

  • Kim, Chang-Min;Heo, Moon-Young;Kim, Hyun-Pyo;Sin, Kwan-Seog;Pachaly, Peter
    • Archives of Pharmacal Research
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.87-92
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    • 1991
  • In order to evaluate the pharmacological activities of Chinese medicine, nine Umbelliferae plants were selected and their restoring activity against dexamethasone-induced disorders, liver protective activity, antimicrobial activity, anti-inflammatory activity and antimutagenic activity were tested and compared. Angelica dahurica. Angelica acutiloba and Ostericum koreanum showed various activities in these tests at the dose used in this study.

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Antioxidant Activity and Irritation Test of Extracts Obtained from Angelica dahurica

  • Lee, Yang-Suk;Kim, Nam-Woo
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.8-11
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    • 2011
  • In this study, we assessed the free radical scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts isolated from the dried roots and stems (including leaves) of Angelica dahurica. The irritation response from these extracts was also assessed to determine potential cosmetic use. Both sources of A. dahurica extracts exhibited radical scavenging properties to different extents. The free radical scavenging potency ($EC_{50}$) of the stems (including leaves) of A. dahurica was 243.33 ${\mu}g/mL$, which is significantly lower (p<0.01) than that observed of the roots (1,161.79 ${\mu}g/mL$). The inhibition values ($EC_{50}$) of xanthine oxidase were as follows: 435.19 ${\mu}g/mL$ (roots) and 434.66 ${\mu}g/mL$ (stems). We noted no significant differences between the two plant parts with regard to ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity. After the application of A. dahurica extracts to rabbits for skin and eye irritation tests, no negative effects were observed; therefore, the extracts are considered to be non-irritating to the skin and eye.