• Title/Summary/Keyword: Anastatus orientalis

Search Result 2, Processing Time 0.049 seconds

Parasitism Rate of Egg Parasitoid Anastatus orientalis (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) on Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in China (중국에서 알기생봉 Anastatus orientalis (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae)의 꽃매미 Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) 알에 대한 기생율)

  • Choi, Man-Young;Yang, Zhong-Qi;Wang, Xiao-Yi;Tang, Yan-Long;Hou, Zhen-Rong;Kim, Jeong Hwan;Byeon, Young Woong
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
    • /
    • v.53 no.2
    • /
    • pp.135-139
    • /
    • 2014
  • Anastatus orientalis Yang et Gibson(Hymenoptera : Eupelmidae) is the egg parasitoid of lantern-fly Lycorma delicatula. The natural parasitism showed that: (1)the highest parasitism rate of egg masses was 68.96% in Yantai Shandong; (2)the highest parasitism rate of eggs was 32.98% in Haidian Beijing; (3)the eggs of parasitoids hatched and emerged earliest in Yangling Shaanxi; emergence time of different populations in Yantai, Guangang Tianjin, Qinhuangdao Hebei and Haidian was similar; (4) the sex ratios were various among the populations ranging from 1.92 to 1.94; (5) parasitism rates of egg masses on Populus sp., Salix sp. and Toona sinensis were not significantly different, the highest parasitism rate of egg masses was 64.3% on T. sinensis, and the lowest rate was 27.4% on Ailanthus altissima; (6)parasitism rates of eggs on Populus sp., Salix sp., T. sinensis and A. altissima were not significantly different, about 30% averagely.

Mass-rearing Techniques of Anastatus orientalis (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae), as the Egg-parasitoid of Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae): An Using Method of Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) and L. delicatula Eggs in Laboratory (꽃매미 알 기생천적인 꽃매미벼룩좀벌의 대량사육기술: 산누에나방과 꽃매미 알 활용 방법)

  • Seo, Meeja;Kim, Jeong Hwan;Seo, Bo Yoon;Park, Changgyu;Choi, Byeong Ryeol;Kim, Kwang Ho;Ji, Chang Woo;Cho, Jum Rae
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
    • /
    • v.57 no.4
    • /
    • pp.243-251
    • /
    • 2018
  • Eggs, immature eggs, and pupae of 8 different insects (Halyomopha halys, Riptortus pedestris, Lymantria dispar, Antheraea yamamai, Verlarifictorus spp, Antheraea pernyi, and Musca domestica) including Lycorma delicatura were used to select the alternative host for laboratory mass rearing of A. orientalis. Except L. delicatula's eggs and immature eggs of A. pernyi, other 7 tested insects were not parasitized by A. orientalis. A. pernyi was reared with oak tree leaves and its cocoons were harvested on mid-July and early October. On 4 or 5 days after emergence, only female adults showing swollen abdomen were collected and stored at $1{\sim}5^{\circ}C$. We could get 150~200 eggs per one female by dissecting the female's abdomen. For examining the possibility for laboratory mass rearing of A. orientalis with A. pernyi's immature eggs, developmental periods from egg to pupa between the two different hosts were compared. Developmental periods were 36.1 days on immature eggs of A. pernyi and 36.8 days on an original host's eggs, respectively. The number of parasitized eggs by A. orientalis' female for 24 h was 3.4 on immature eggs of A. pernyi and 4.2 on an original host's eggs, respectively. However, there were no significant statistical differences in developmental period and parasitization between the two hosts. By supplying honeyed water to newly emerged female parasitoids, it was able to maximize their longevities up to 64.3 days after emergence. Therefore, our results support potential for laboratory mass-rearing of A. orientalis using A. pernyi's immature eggs as an alternative host.