• Title/Summary/Keyword: Amputation

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Predictors for Amputation in Patients with Diabetic Foot Wound

  • Kim, Se-Young;Kim, Tae Hoon;Choi, Jun-Young;Kwon, Yu-Jin;Choi, Dong Hui;Kim, Ki Chun;Kim, Min Ji;Hwang, Ho Kyung;Lee, Kyung-Bok
    • Vascular Specialist International
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    • v.34 no.4
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    • pp.109-116
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: Diabetic foot wound (DFW) is known as a major contributor of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. We aimed to evaluate overall amputation rates and risk factors for amputation in patients with DFW. Materials and Methods: From January 2014 to December 2017, 141 patients with DFW were enrolled. We determined rates and risk factors of major amputation in DFW and in DFW with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). In addition, we investigated rates and predictors for amputation in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Results: The overall rate of major amputation was 26.2% in patients with DFW. Among 141 DFWs, 76 patients (53.9%) had PAOD and 29 patients (38.2%) of 76 DFWs with PAOD underwent major amputation. Wound state according to Wagner classification, congestive heart failure, leukocytosis, dementia, and PAOD were the significant risk factors for major amputation. In DFW with PAOD, Wagner classification grades and leukocytosis were the predictors for major amputation. In addition, amputation was performed for 28 patients (38.4%) while major amputation was performed for 5 patients (6.8%) of 73 DFUs. Only the presence of osteomyelitis (OM) showed significant difference for amputation in DFU. Conclusion: This study represented that approximately a quarter of DFWs underwent major amputation. Moreover, over half of DFW patients had PAOD and about 38.2% of them underwent major amputation. Wound state and PAOD was major predictors for major amputation in DFW. Systemic factors, such as CHF, leukocytosis, and dementia were identified as risk factors for major amputation. In terms of DFU, 38.4% underwent amputation and the presence of OM was a determinant for amputation.

Prognostic Factors of Wound Healing after Diabetic Foot Amputation; ABI, TBI, and Toe Pressure (당뇨병성 족부 궤양에 의한 절단술후 상처 치유와 발목-상완 지수, 족지-상완 지수, 족지압의 관계)

  • Park, Se-Jin;Jeong, Hwa-Jae;Kim, Eugene;Lee, Jae-Wook
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.16 no.4
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    • pp.217-222
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to establish guidelines for ankle-brachial index (ABI), toe-brachial index (TBI) and toe pressure with regard to healing of diabetic foot amputation wound. Material and Methods: We designed a retrospective study that included patients with diabetic foot ulcer. From 2008 to 2011, 46 patients who had suffered from amputation of a foot due to diabetic foot ulcer were included in this study. We divided them into amputation-success group and amputation-revision group, and compared their ankle-brachial index (ABI), toe-brachial index (TBI) and toe pressure between two groups. Amputation-revision group is that first forefoot amputation is failed to heal successfully and need to have another proximal amputation. Results: Toe pressure was 78 mmHg (54~107) in the amputation success group, 0 mmHg (0~43) in the amputation revision group (p=0.000). Ankle-brachial index was 1.1650(1.0475~1.1975) in the amputation success group, 0.92(0.5275~1.0750) in the amputation revision group (p=0.05), and toe-brachial index was 0.6100(0.4050~0.7575) in the amputation success group, 0.00(0.00~0.4150) in the amputation revision group (p=0.04), respectively. Conclusion: ABI, TBI, toe pressure of amputation success group were significantly higher than those of amputation revision group.

Comprehensive Analysis for Risk Factors of Lower Extremity Amputation as a Treatment of Complicated Diabetic Foot (당뇨 합병증으로 인한 하지 절단술의 위험 인자의 포괄적 분석)

  • Chung, Hyung-Jin;Bae, Su-Young;Min, Byoung-Kwon;Park, Jae-Gu;Kam, Min-Cheol;Choi, Ji-Won
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.16 no.4
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    • pp.257-264
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: The diabetic foot lesions are intractable, and aggravation often leads to amputation. None or minor amputation group was treated debridement or toe amputation and major amputation group was treated Ray, Lisfranc, Chopart, Below Knee and Above Knee amputation. We investigate the risk factors for major limb amputations among patients with diabetic foot lesion. Materials and Methods: The subjects were 73 diabetic foot lesion patients (83 diabetic foot lesions) treated at our department from January 2006 to December 2010. Non or Minor amputation group of 44 cases were treated with debridement or toe amputation. Major amputation group of 39 cases were treated with Ray, Lisfranc, Chopart, below or above Knee amputation. We investigated socioeconomic factors, diabetes mellitus related factors and wound related factors and laboratory factors. Statistical analysis was done by Students t-test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney's U test. Results: In our analysis, wound size, wound classification (Wagner classification, Brodsky classification), white blood cell counts, polymorphoneuclear neutrophil percentage, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein and albumin were risk factors for major amputation (p<0.05). Conclusion: Low education level, nutritional condition, premorbid activity level and progressed wound condition were observed in major amputation group compared with non or minor amputation group. In the major amputation group, higher white blood cell count, C-reactive protein level and lower albumin level were observed. Together with maintenance of adequate nutritional condition, early detection of lesions and foot care for early treatment is important. Therefore, active investigation with full risk evaluation of vascular complication is also important.

Amputation in Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Infection (당뇨병성 족부 궤양 및 감염에서의 절단)

  • Han, Seung Hwan;Park, Young Chang
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.18 no.1
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    • pp.8-13
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    • 2014
  • Amputation of diabetic foot ulcer and infection is a critical modality for saving a patient's life from life threatening infections or ischemic limbs. However, it can cause serious handicaps or complications, such as lifetime shortening and re-amputation of the other limb. The minimal amputation is the main goal of amputation in diabetic patients. However, insufficient amputation can have a harmful effect on patients. The decision of amputation is very difficult and should be made using multidisciplinary approaches. All aspects of the patient's situation, including vascular status, degree of infection, and medical conditions should be considered. The foot surgeon should keep in mind the notion that proper amputation can lead to a new life for diabetic foot patients.

The Amputation Rate and Associated Risk Factors within 1 Year after the Diagnosis of Diabetic Foot Ulcer (당뇨병성 족부 궤양 환자의 진단 1년 내의 절단율 및 위험 인자의 분석)

  • Chun, Dong-Il;Jeon, Min Chul;Choi, Sung-Woo;Kim, Yong-Beom;Nho, Jae-Hwi;Won, Sung Hun
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.20 no.3
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    • pp.121-125
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    • 2016
  • Purpose: This study investigates the amputation rate within 1 year after the diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer and its associated risk factors. Materials and Methods: This study enrolled 60 patients with diabetic foot ulcer. The mean and standard deviation age was $64.4{\pm}12.8years$ (range, 32~89 years); the mean and standard deviation prevalence period for diabetes mellitus was $21.0{\pm}7.5years$ (range, 0.5~36 years). The amputation rate was evaluated by dividing the subjects into two groups - the major and minor amputation groups - within 1 year following the initial diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for amputation. Results: The total amputation rate of 38.3% (n=23) was comprised of the amputation rate for the major amputation group (10.0%) and rate for the minor amputation group (23.8%). There was a high correlation between peripheral artery disease (toe brachial pressure index <0.7) and amputation (hazard ratio [HR] 5.81, confidence interval [CI] 2.09~16.1, p<0.01). Nephropathy was significantly correlated with the amputation rate (HR 3.53, CI 1.29~9.64, p=0.01). Conclusion: Clinicians who treat patients with diabetic foot complications must understand the fact that the amputation rate within 1 year is significant, and that the amputation rate of patients with peripheral artery disease or nephropathy is especially high.

A Report on Diabetic Foot and Amputation from the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service Data (건강보험심사평가원 자료를 바탕으로 한 당뇨발과 절단에 관한 보고)

  • Kim, Jong-Kil;Jung, Young-Ran;Kim, Kyung-Tae;Shin, Chung-Shik;Lee, Kwang-Bok
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.21 no.2
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    • pp.66-69
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    • 2017
  • Purpose: This study reports on limb amputations in diabetic patients according to gender, age, and region based on the data from the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service. Materials and Methods: The number of amputations was compared by region, age, gender, and year, as well as by femoral region, lower leg, foot, and toe in diabetic patients who received limb amputation. This analysis was performed based on the data from the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service, between January 2009 and December 2014. Results: The total number of amputations between the study period was 9,155. The number of patients who were treated at hospitals for diabetes in 2009 was 1.9 million, among which, 1,214 patients underwent amputation. In 2014, the incidence of diabetes was 1,747 in 2.58 million individuals. With this rising incidence of diabetes, the amputation of limbs due to diabetes is increasing every year. In particular, the following regions were amputated more often: femoral region, 2.3%; lower legs, 19.6%; feet, 18.1%; and toes 60.0%. Regarding gender differences, males showed a higher amputation rate than females for all body parts. With respect to region, Seoul was the highest with 30.2%, followed by Gyeonggi with 19.9%, and Busan with 8.8%. According to age, older age showed greater diabetic amputation rate. Conclusion: In accordance with the rising incidence of diabetes, the diabetic amputation is also increasing. Here, we showed that toes were amputated with the highest percentage and males had greater amputation rate than females for all body parts. Moreover, amputation rate was highest in older diabetic patients, especially for those in their seventies. Additionally, Seoul was the region with highest amputation rate.

Stimulation of Fecundity through Antennal Amputation in the Mulberry Silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

  • Singh, Ravindra;Kumar, Virendra;Kariappa, B.K.;Dandin, S.B.;Rao, D.Raghavendra
    • International Journal of Industrial Entomology
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    • v.8 no.2
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    • pp.217-219
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    • 2004
  • Stimulation of fecundity following female antennal amputation has been reported for the first time in silkworm. Antennal amputation caused significant increase in fecundity in two newly evolved multivoltine silkworm breeds viz., BL 67 and 96A. This study indicated better chances for increasing egg yield and the increase in fecundity may be attributed to the action of some neurohormones. Significance of antennal amputation in silkworm has been discussed.

Clinical Analysis and Results after the Amputations of Lower Extremities due to Diabetic Foot (당뇨병성 족부 질환에 의한 하지 절단 후 임상적 분석과 결과)

  • Kim, Taik-Seon;Kang, Jong-Woo;Lee, Sang-Jun;Huh, Young-Jae;Kim, Hak-Jun
    • Journal of Korean Foot and Ankle Society
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    • v.13 no.1
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    • pp.50-54
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    • 2009
  • Purpose: The authors evaluated the clinical results and prognosis after amputating the lower extremity due to diabetic foot. Materials and Methods: From 1991 to 2003, the patients who had suffered amputation of his lower extremity due to diabetic foot ulcer were evaluated retrospectively. 79 patients were male and 6 patients were female. The author evaluated the patient who had the ipsilateral additional surgery, contralateral amputation, level of blood sugar, combined disease and mortality rate within 5 years from medical record. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier survival test. Results: Mean age of patients who had first experienced amputation was 63.4 years old. The mean duration of diabetes until amputation was $14.5{\pm}7.5$ years. Major amputations were 50 cases and minor amputations 35 cases. 20 patients (23.5%) were suffered ipsilateral secondary surgery including revised stump. Overall 5-year mortality rate was 18.8% (16 cases). Death rate within 1 year was 8.2% (7 cases), mortality rate within 3 years was 14.1% (12 cases). 5-year mortality rate after major amputation was 20% (10 cases) and after minor amputation was 17.1% (6 cases). It was statistically significant (p<0.05). Patient who underwent more than 2 combined vascular related disease had higher mortality rate than diabetic amputee without combined disease (p<0.05). Conclusion: Mortality rate after major amputation was significant higher than amputation after minor amputation in diabetic patients from our data.

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Replantation for Segmental Amputation of the Digits and Hand: A Case Report

  • An, Sung Jin;Lee, Sang Hyun;Min, Hong Sung;Kim, In Hee;Kim, Jeung Il
    • Archives of Reconstructive Microsurgery
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    • v.25 no.2
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    • pp.60-64
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    • 2016
  • Segmental amputation of the digits and hand has been described as a contraindication for replantation because of poor results. We report the results of replantation for a patient who experienced multi-segment amputation of the hand. A 39-year-old man presented six hours after an accident, while using a straw cutter, that caused a multi-segment amputation of the entire palm and digits. The replantation surgery took 18 hours. We observed the patient gain satisfactory function of the hand. For replantation of a multi-segment amputation, connecting as many blood vessels as possible without tension is most important.

Lengthening of the Above-knee Amputation Stump - Reports of 2 cases - (소아 슬관절 상부 절단단 연장 성형술 - 증례 보고 2례 -)

  • Kim, Tai-Seung;Kim, Jong-Koo;Whang, Kuhn-Sung
    • The Journal of the Korean bone and joint tumor society
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    • v.4 no.1
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    • pp.53-58
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    • 1998
  • Limb-salvage surgery has become more popular than amputation for the treatment of malignant bone tumor because no differences in local recurrence and the 5-year survival rate have been found. However for young patients with sarcoma, skeletal immaturity may be a contraindication to limb-salvage surgery due to the expected leg length discrepancy. If limb-sparing procedure should be impossible for skeletally immature patients, amputation has to be given first consideration. To minimize the functional difficulty from short amputation stump of above knee amputation, we performed lengthening of the amputation stump using ipsilateral tibia. One patient was lengthened 17cm using ipsilateral tibia and the other, 12cm. Two patients and their families were satisfied both clinically and psychologically.

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