• Title, Summary, Keyword: ABO blood groups

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Lack of any Association between Blood Groups and Lung Cancer, Independent of Histology

  • Oguz, Arzu;Unal, Dilek;Tasdemir, Arzu;Karahan, Samet;Aykas, Fatma;Mutlu, Hasan;Cihan, Yasemin Benderli;Kanbay, Mehmet
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.453-456
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    • 2013
  • Introduction: Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer deaths, is divided into 2 main classes based on its biology, therapy and prognosis: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Many cases are at an advanced stage at diagnosis, which is a major obstacle to improving outcomes. It is important to define the high risk group patients for early diagnosis and chance of cure. Blood group antigens are chemical components on erythrocyte membranes but they are also expressed on a variety of epithelial cells. Links between ABO blood groups with benign or malignant diseases, such as gastric and pancreas cancers, have been observed for a long time. In this study, we aimed to investigate any possible relationship between lung cancer histological subtypes and ABO-Rh blood groups. Materials and Methods: The files of 307 pathologically confirmed lung cancer patients were reviewed retrospectively. Cases with a serologically determined blood group and Rh factor were included and those with a history of another primary cancer were excluded, leaving a total of 221. The distribution of blood groups of the lung cancer patients were compared with the distribution of blood groups of healthy donors admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in the year 2012. Results: There was no significant difference between patients with lung cancer of either type and the control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh factor (p: 0.073). There was also no relationship with non small cell cancer histological subtypes. Conclusions: In this study, we found no relationship between the ABO-Rhesus blood groups and NSCLC and SCLC groups. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of ABO blood groups in SCLC patients.

Lack of Any Relationship between ABO and Rh Blood Groups and Clinicopathological Features in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Turkish Oncology Group

  • Urun, Yuksel;Utkan, Gungor;Yalcin, Suayib;CosKun, Hasan Senol;Kocer, Murat;Ozdemir, Nuriye Yildirim;Kaplan, Mehmet Ali;Arslan, Ulku Yalcintas;Ozdemir, Feyyaz;Oztuna, Derya;Akbulut, Hakan;Icli, Fikri
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.8
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    • pp.4129-4131
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    • 2012
  • Background: An association between the ABO blood group and the risk of certain malignancies, including pancreatic and gastric cancer, has been reported previously. However, it is unclear whether this association is valid for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In this study, ABO blood groups and the Rh factor were investigated in a series of GIST cases. Material and Methods: In 162 patients with GIST, blood group and Rh factor were examined and compared with a control group of 3,022,883 healthy volunteer blood donors of the Turkish Red Crescent between 2004 and 2011. The relationship of blood groups with tumor size, mitotic activity, and age were also evaluated. Results: Overall, the ABO blood group and Rh factor distributions of the 162 patients with GIST were similar to those of the general population. There were no significant differences between both ABO blood types and Rh factor in terms of tumor size, mitotic activity, and age. Conclusion: This is the first study reported on this issue. In our study, we didn't find any relationship between GIST and ABO blood group and Rh factor. However further studies with larger number of patients are needed to establish the role of blood groups in this population.

Association of ABO Blood Group and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Multicenter Study in Turkey

  • Urun, Yuksel;Utkan, Gungor;Cangir, Ayten Kayi;Oksuzoglu, Omur Berna;Ozdemir, Nuriye;Oztuna, Derya Gokmen;Kocaman, Gokhan;Coskun, Hasan Senol;Kaplan, Muhammet Ali;Yuksel, Cabir;Demirkazik, Ahmet;Icli, Fikri
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.2801-2803
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    • 2013
  • Background: The ABO blood groups and Rh factor may affect the risk of lung cancer. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 2,044 lung cancer patients with serologically confirmed ABO/Rh blood group. A group of 3,022,883 healthy blood donors of Turkish Red Crescent was identified as a control group. We compared the distributions of ABO/Rh blood group between them. Results: The median age was 62 years (range: 17-90). There was a clear male predominance (84% vs. 16%). Overall distributions of ABO blood groups were significantly different between patients and controls (p=0.01). There were also significant differences between patients and controls with respect to Rh positive vs. Rh negative (p=0.04) and O vs. non-O (p=0.002). There were no statistically significant differences of blood groups with respect to sex, age, or histology. Conclusions: In the study population, ABO blood types were associated with the lung cancer. Having non-O blood type and Rh-negative feature increased the risk of lung cancer. However, further prospective studies are necessary to define the mechanisms by which ABO blood type may influence the lung cancer risk.

ABO Blood Group, Epstein-Barr virus Infection and Prognosis of Patients with Non-metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

  • Zhang, Ya-Xiong;Kang, Shi-Yang;Chen, Gang;Fang, Wen-Feng;Wu, Xuan;You, Hua-Jing;He, Da-Cheng;Cao, Ya-Lin;Liang, Wen-Hua;Zhang, Li
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.17
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    • pp.7459-7465
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    • 2014
  • Background: A prior study showed blood type A/AB to be associated with an increased risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) compared to subjects with blood type O. However, the relationship between ABO blood groups and prognosis of NPC patients is still questionable. In addition, whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with prognosis of NPC patients with different ABO blood groups is unclear. Materials and Methods: We conducted univariate and multivariable Cox regression analyses based on a consecutive cohort of 1,601 patients to investigate the above issues. Results: There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between different ABO blood groups (p=0.629), neither between A vs. non-A blood groups (p=0.895) nor AB vs. non-AB blood group (p=0.309) in univariate analyses and after adjusting for other factors. Interaction tests revealed that high immunoglobulin A against Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (VcA-IgA) level was associated with a favorable prognosis in male patients with UICC stage II disease who had an A blood type (p=0.008), compared with those with non-A blood type. In addition, male patients with an A blood group with a high blood lymphocyte level showeda tendency towards better survival in UICC stage III (p=0.096). Conclusions: ABO blood group status is not associated with the prognosis of patients with NPC. Additionally, blood group A male NPC patients with high VcA-IgA level or high blood lymphocyte counts might be correlated with a favorable prognosis in UICC stage II or III, respectively.

Is There an Association between Blood Group and Survival in Pancreatic Cancer?

  • Kos, F. Tugba;Civelek, Burak;Seker, M. Metin;Arik, Zafer;Aksoy, Sercan;Uncu, Dogan;Ozdemir, Nuriye;Zengin, Nurullah
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.12
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    • pp.6151-6153
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    • 2012
  • Background: An association between the ABO groups and pancreatic cancer has been shown previously, group A being significantly commoner in affected patients. We conducted the present study to investigate the prognostic effect of ABO blood group on overall survival of pancreas cancer patients. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed between 2005 and 2010 with pancreas cancer at Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. Patient demographics and ABO blood groups were obtained from medical charts. Results: Fifty pancreas cancer patients with known ABO blood group were included, 26 (52%) group A, 12 patients (24%) group 0, 9 (18%) group B, and 3 (6%) group AB. Blood group A pancreas cancer patient median age was 61.5 (39-80) years, with the median age of the other blood groups (B, AB,O) being 55.5 (32-74) years (p=0.14). 18% of patients with blood group A and 11% of the other blood group patients had metastasis (p=0.17) at the time of diagnosis. The median overall survival of blood group A pancreas patients was significantly lower than the other blood group patients, 7.6 (95%CI: 5.0-10.2) months versus 29.0 (95%CI: 0.0-68.8) months (p=0.05). Conclusions: Acccording to previously published cohort studies a relation may exist between ABO blood groups and cancer of pancreas. In this study we observed that pancreas cancer patients with blood group A have significantly worse overall survival than other blood groups.

ABO Blood Groups are Not Associated with Treatment Response and Prognosis in Patients with Local Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  • Unal, Dilek;Eroglu, Celalettin;Kurtul, Neslihan;Oguz, Arzu;Tasdemir, Arzu;Kaplan, Bunyamin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.6
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    • pp.3945-3948
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    • 2013
  • Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, late diagnosis being the main obstacle to improving the outcomes with stage at diagnosis as an important prognostic factor. Relationships between ABO blood groups and risk of benign or malignant diseases have been observed and in this study, we aimed to investigate whether they might affect prognosis and response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: Eighty-one patients with non-metastatic local advanced NSCLC were included in the study. ABO blood groups were A in 45 (55.6%), B in 7 (8.6%), AB in 8 (9.9%), and O in 21 (25.9%) patients. The patients were also divided two groups according to blood group A (45 patients) and non-A (B, AB and O; 36 patients). Response to chemoradiotherapy was complete remission in 10 (12.3%), disease regression in 42 (51.9%), stable disease in 12 (14.8%), and disease progression in 17 (21.0%) patients. Results: There was no significant difference among ABO blood group categories or between patients with A blood group and those with non-A blood group in terms of responses to chemoradiotherapy (p>0.05). There were also no significant differences regarding overall and disease-free survival rates. Conclusion: The ABO blood group system has no significant effect on prognosis and response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with non-metastatic NSCLC.

Relationships between Skin Cancers and Blood Groups - Link between Non-melanomas and ABO/Rh Factors

  • Cihan, Yasemin Benderli;Baykan, Halit;Kavuncuoglu, Erhan;Mutlu, Hasan;Kucukoglu, Mehmet Burhan;Ozyurt, Kemal;Oguz, Arzu
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.7
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    • pp.4199-4203
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    • 2013
  • Background: This investigation focused on possible relationships between skin cancers and ABO/Rh blood groups. Materials and Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2012, medical data of 255 patients with skin cancers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Radiation Oncology and Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinics were retrospectively analyzed. Blood groups of these patients were recorded. The control group consisted of 25701 healthy volunteers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Blood Donation Center between January 2010 and December 2011. The distribution of the blood groups of the patients with skin cancers was compared to the distribution of ABO/Rh blood groups of healthy controls. The association of the histopathological subtypes of skin cancer with the blood groups was also investigated. Results: Of the patients, 50.2% had A type, 26.3% had O type, 16.1% had B type, and 7.5% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 77.3%. Of the controls, 44.3% had A type, 31.5% had 0 type, 16.1% had B type, and 8.1% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 87.8%. There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of blood groups and Rh factors (A Rh (-) and 0 Rh positive) between the patients and controls. A total of 36.8% and 20.4% of the patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively, while 39.2% and 27.6% of the controls had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between the patients with BCC and controls in terms of A Rh (-) (p=0.001). Conclusion: Our study results demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between non-melanoma skin cancer and ABO/Rh factors.

ABO and Rh Blood Groups and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

  • Urun, Yuksel;Ozdemir, Nuriye Yildirim;Utkan, Gungor;Akbulut, Hakan;Savas, Berna;Oksuzoglu, Berna;Oztuna, Derya Gokmen;Dogan, Izzet;Yalcin, Bulent;Senler, Filiz Cay;Onur, Handan;Demirkazik, Ahmet;Zengin, Nurullah;Icli, Fikri
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.12
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    • pp.6097-6100
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    • 2012
  • Background: Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk for certain gastrointestinal malignancies, including pancreatic and gastric cancer. However, it is unclear whether there is such an association with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, possible relationships between ABO blood groups and Rh factor and KRAS status in patients with CRC were investigated. Materials and Methods: In 1,620 patients with CRC, blood group and Rh factor were examined and compared with the control group of 3,022,883 healthy volunteer blood donors of the Turkish Red Crescent between 2004 and 2011. The relationship of blood groups with wild type K-ras status was also evaluated. Results: Overall distributions of ABO blood groups as well as Rh factor were comparable between patients (45% A, 7.2% AB, 16.4% B, 31.4% O, and 87.2% Rh+) and controls (42.2% A, 7.6% AB, 16.3% B, 33.9% O, and 87.7% Rh+) (p=0.099). However, there were statistically significant difference between patients and controls with respect to O vs. non O blood group (p=0.033) and marginally significant difference for A vs. non-A blood group (p=0.052). Among patients, the median age was 62 (range 17-97), 58.1% were male. There were no statistically significant differences respect to sex and K-ras status. Conclusion: In present study, the ABO/Rh blood groups were statistically significantly associated with the risk of CRC. There were no relationship between K-ras status and ABO blood group and Rh factor. However further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to establish the role of blood groups and to define t he mechanisms by which ABO blood type affect CRC.

ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Relation to Ovarian, Endometrial and Cervical Cancer Risk Among The Population of South-East Siberia

  • Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.;Kutikhin, Anton G.
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.10
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    • pp.5091-5096
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    • 2012
  • Background: There is a large amount of evidence that the ABO blood group system may play a role in disease etiology. A relationship between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and cancer risk has been demonstrated in a number of studies. However, in relation to gynecological malignancies, these findings are inconsistent and contradictory. Aim: To perform a case-control study for analysis of the distribution of ABO and Rh blood antigens among women from South-East Siberia who suffered from ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer, and to assess the potential role of these antigens in carcinogenesis. Design, Subjects and Methods: A total of 1,163 cases with ovarian cancer (n=551), endometrial cancer (n=440) and cervical cancer (n=172) were involved in the study. The control group was formed from 22,581 female blood donors. Blood groups were determined through patients medical records and blood donor records. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The blood group O was defined as the referent group, as it has the greatest frequency in the populations of Southern Siberia. P values less than 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Results: We found that carriage of non-O blood types increased the risk of ovarian cancer by 40-60%, and the magnitude of this relationship was strongest in women with the AB (IV) blood group. Carriage of the A (II) blood group strongly correlated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in premenopausal, but not in postmenopausal women. No statistically significant correlations were obtained for endometrial cancer and cervical cancer. Additionally, we did not observe a relationship between Rhesus factor and cancer risk. Conclusion: We suggest that carriage of non-O blood groups may elevate risk of ovarian cancer and can play a role in its development.

Significance of ABO-Rh Blood Groups in Response and Prognosis in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

  • Cihan, Yasemin Benderli
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.9
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    • pp.4055-4060
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    • 2014
  • Background: To evaluate whether ABO-Rh blood groups have significance in the treatment response and prognosis in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated files of 335 patients with breast cancer who were treated between 2005 and 2010. Demographic data, clinic-pathological findings, treatments employed, treatment response, and overall and disease-free survivals were reviewed. Relationships between clinic-pathological findings and blood groups were evaluated. Results: 329 women and 6 men were included to the study. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.2 years (range: 26-86). Of the cases, 95% received chemotherapy while 70% were given radiotherapy and 60.9% adjuvant hormone therapy after surgery. Some 63.0% were A blood group, 17.6% O, 14.3% B and 5.1% AB. In addition, 82.0% of the cases were Rh-positive. Mean follow-up was 24.5 months. Median overall and progression-free survival times were 83.9 and 79.5 months, respectively. Overall and disease-free survival times were found to be higher in patients with A and O blood groups (p<0.05). However rates did not differ with the Rh-positive group (p=0.226). In univariate and multivariate analyses, ABO blood groups were identified as factors that had significant effects on overall and disease-survival times (p=0.011 and p=0.002). Conclusions: It was seen that overall and disease-free survival times were higher in breast cancer patients with A and O blood groups when compared to those with other blood groups. It was seen that A and O blood groups had good prognostic value in patients with breast cancer.