• Title, Summary, Keyword: 3D reference point array

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Method of Making the Distribution of Voxels Uniform within the Volumetric 3D image Space

  • Lin, Yuanfang;Liu, Xu;Xie, Xiaoyan;Liu, Xiangdong;Li, Haifeng
    • 한국정보디스플레이학회:학술대회논문집
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    • pp.1138-1141
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    • 2008
  • By defining a uniform reference point array corresponding to the 3D voxel array and abandoning voxels whose deviations from their respective reference points exceed a given tolerance, the distribution of voxels within the volumetric 3D image space gets uniform, effects of non-uniform distribution upon the image reconstructing are eased.

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Construction of Static 3D Ultrasonography Image by Radiation Beam Tracking Method from 1D Array Probe (1차원 배열 탐촉자의 방사빔추적기법을 이용한 정적 3차원 초음파진단영상 구성)

  • Kim, Yong Tae;Doh, Il;Ahn, Bongyoung;Kim, Kwang-Youn
    • Journal of the Korean Society for Nondestructive Testing
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    • v.35 no.2
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    • pp.128-133
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    • 2015
  • This paper describes the construction of a static 3D ultrasonography image by tracking the radiation beam position during the handy operation of a 1D array probe to enable point-of-care use. The theoretical model of the transformation from the translational and rotational information of the sensor mounted on the probe to the reference Cartesian coordinate system was given. The signal amplification and serial communication interface module was made using a commercially available sensor. A test phantom was also made using silicone putty in a donut shape. During the movement of the hand-held probe, B-mode movie and sensor signals were recorded. B-mode images were periodically selected from the movie, and the gray levels of the pixels for each image were converted to the gray levels of 3D voxels. 3D and 2D images of arbitrary cross-section of the B-mode type were also constructed from the voxel data, and agreed well with the shape of the test phantom.

Patient-Specific Quality Assurance in a Multileaf Collimator-Based CyberKnife System Using the Planar Ion Chamber Array

  • Yoon, Jeongmin;Lee, Eungman;Park, Kwangwoo;Kim, Jin Sung;Kim, Yong Bae;Lee, Ho
    • Progress in Medical Physics
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    • v.29 no.2
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    • pp.59-65
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    • 2018
  • This paper describes the clinical use of the dose verification of multileaf collimator (MLC)-based CyberKnife plans by combining the Octavius 1000SRS detector and water-equivalent RW3 slab phantom. The slab phantom consists of 14 plates, each with a thickness of 10 mm. One plate was modified to support tracking by inserting 14 custom-made fiducials on surface holes positioned at the outer region of $10{\times}10cm^2$. The fiducial-inserted plate was placed on the 1000SRS detector and three plates were additionally stacked up to build the reference depth. Below the detector, 10 plates were placed to avoid longer delivery times caused by proximity detection program alerts. The cross-calibration factor prior to phantom delivery was obtained by performing with 200 monitor units (MU) on the field size of $95{\times}92.5mm^2$. After irradiation, the measured dose distribution of the coronal plane was compared with the dose distribution calculated by the MultiPlan treatment planning system. The results were assessed by comparing the absolute dose at the center point of 1000SRS and the 3-D Gamma (${\gamma}$) index using 220 patient-specific quality assurance (QA). The discrepancy between measured and calculated doses at the center point of 1000SRS detector ranged from -3.9% to 8.2%. In the dosimetric comparison using 3-D ${\gamma}$-function (3%/3 mm criteria), the mean passing rates with ${\gamma}$-parameter ${\leq}1$ were $97.4%{\pm}2.4%$. The combination of the 1000SRS detector and RW3 slab phantom can be utilized for dosimetry validation of patient-specific QA in the CyberKnife MLC system, which made it possible to measure absolute dose distributions regardless of tracking mode.

Photogrammetry 기법을 활용한 MSC 설치면의 정밀 측정

  • Woo, Sung-Hyun;Kim, Hong-Bae;Moon, Sang-Mu;Im, Jong-Min
    • Aerospace Engineering and Technology
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.126-133
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    • 2004
  • Photogrammetry, as its name implies, is a 3-dimensional coordinate measuring technique that uses photographs as the fundamental medium for metrology. In the last few years the accuracy of photogrammetry has increased dramatically thanks to the rapid advance of digital camera manufacturing technique. This paper discusses photogrammetric measurement of the interface surface of MSC(Multi-Spectral Camera), which is a main payload of KOMPSAT-2. Total 24 paper targets on the objective surfaces and two scale bars calibrated with high accuracy were used for measurement, and multiple images were taken from 11 different camera angles by using a spacecraft rotation dolly. As a result of analysis, 3D coordinates of each targeted point were obtained and the flatness value based on the selected reference plane was calculated and compared with the pre-determined requirement. The technique acquired by this study is expected to be used for the 3D precise measurement of ultra-light weight and inflatable space structures such as a satellite antenna and a solar array.

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Comparison of the Efficacy of 2D Dosimetry Systems in the Pre-treatment Verification of IMRT (세기조절방사선치료의 환자별 정도관리를 위한 2차원적 선량계의 유용성 평가)

  • Hong, Chae-Seon;Lim, Jong-Soo;Ju, Sang-Gyu;Shin, Eun-Hyuk;Han, Young-Yih;Ahn, Yong-Chan
    • Radiation Oncology Journal
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    • v.27 no.2
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    • pp.91-102
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    • 2009
  • Purpose: To compare the accuracy and efficacy of EDR2 film, a 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX) and an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in the pre-treatment QA of IMRT. Materials and Methods: Fluence patterns, shaped as a wedge with 10 steps (segments) by a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), of reference and test IMRT fields were measured using EDR2 film, the MatriXX, and EPID. Test fields were designed to simulate leaf positioning errors. The absolute dose at a point in each step of the reference fields was measured in a water phantom with an ionization chamber and was compared to the dose obtained with the use of EDR2 film, the MatriXX and EPID. For qualitative analysis, all measured fluence patterns of both reference and test fields were compared with calculated dose maps from a radiation treatment planning system (Pinnacle, Philips, USA) using profiles and $\gamma$ evaluation with 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. By measurement of the time to perform QA, we compared the workload of EDR2 film, the MatriXX and EPID. Results: The percent absolute dose difference between the measured and ionization chamber dose was within 1% for the EPID, 2% for the MatriXX and 3% for EDR2 film. The percentage of pixels with $\gamma$%>1 for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria was within 2% for use of both EDR2 film and the EPID. However, differences for the use of the MatriXX were seen with a maximum difference as great as 5.94% with the 2%/2 mm criteria. For the test fields, EDR2 film and EPID could detect leaf-positioning errors on the order of -3 mm and -2 mm, respectively. However it was difficult to differentiate leaf-positioning errors with the MatriXX due to its poor resolution. The approximate time to perform QA was 110 minutes for the use of EDR2 film, 80 minutes for the use of the MatriXX and approximately 55 minutes for the use of the EPID. Conclusion: This study has evaluated the accuracy and efficacy of EDR2 film, the MatriXX and EPID in the pre-treatment verification of IMRT. EDR2 film and the EPID showed better performance for accuracy, while the use of the MatriXX significantly reduced measurement and analysis times. We propose practical and useful methods to establish an effective QA system in a clinical environment.