• Title/Summary/Keyword: 운보문

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A Method for Establishing Chronology of Cloud Patterns Based on the Cover Patterns of Oegyujanggak Uigwe Books in the Late Joseon Period (외규장각 의궤 책의 문양을 통한 운보문 편년 설정 방법)

  • Lee, Eunjoo
    • MUNHWAJAE Korean Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies
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    • v.52 no.4
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    • pp.18-37
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    • 2019
  • This study derived a method for establishing the chronology of cloud patterns by examining the arrangement of the treasure motifs in the cloud pattern used in the relevant pattern-decorated book covers of 89 Oegyujanggak Uigwe books, which are currently housed in the National Museum of Korea. The cloud pattern with a treasure motif was used in the covers of a total of 89 books from King Hyojong Gukjangdogam Uigwe (1659) to Sadoseja Garyedogam Uigwe (1744), spanning 86 years. First, to analyze the cloud pattern, it should be broken down into smaller parts to the extent that the different shapes of treasure motifs can be recognized. Secondly, the method of decoding the pattern is as follows: First, check whether the pattern is arranged in one or two directions from the vertex of the cloud's head, and determine the direction of the cloud tail. Then, decode the treasure motif's arrangement starting from the vertex of the cloud's head toward the direction the tail of manja is headed. Record the findings of this decoding process by categorizing them. Thirdly, as a result of the analysis, a total of 28 types of cloud patterns with treasure motifs were identified in 89 books. There were 45 types of treasure motifs used in such patterns. Finally, we have concluded that applying the method of decoding the treasure motif in the cloud pattern to portraits, excavated costumes, and various relics can be useful to establish the chronology of cloud patterns in the late Joseon period. The method suggested in this study is called 'The Reading Method of Chronology in Cloud Pattern with Treasure Motifs' (also 'Jeung-ha Cloud Pattern Reading Method').

Wrapping Cloth with Cloud and Treasures Pattern Donated by the Head House of the Descendants of Lee Hangbok at the National Museum of Korea: Dating and Analysis of the Cloud and Treasures Pattern (국립중앙박물관 소장 이항복 종가 기증 운보문단 보자기 무늬의 특징과 연대추정)

  • Hwang, Jinyoung
    • Conservation Science in Museum
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    • v.23
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    • pp.49-60
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    • 2020
  • The wrapping cloth with Cloud and Treasures Pattern donated by the head house of the descendants of Lee Hangbok (1556-1618) at the National Museum of Korea underwent conservation treatment for its protection and display. It was then compared with other ancient fabric objects for dating and analysis of the design. The subjects of Cloud and Treasures Patterns of clothing excavated from tombs dated to some point between the birth and death of Lee Hangbok and with Cloud and Treasures Patterns on the covers of Uigwe copies from the same period from the late 16th and 18th centuries were compared. The results of comparison with relics with clear dating are as follows: First, The Cloud and Treasures Patterns on the late 16th and 17th centuries the differences in the proportion between the head and the tail of the cloud among. Second, the Cloud and Treasures Patterns on the covers of Uigwe copies and fabrics excavated from tombs dated no later than the early 1700s share similarities with the Cloud and Treasures Pattern on the donated wrapping cloth in terms of the arrangement and size of designs and the proportion between each portion of the design. Though the study failed to identify the exact use of the wrapping cloth, it was estimated to be produced in early 18th century when the portraits of Lee Hangbok were copied.

A Study on the Costumes of Meritorious Vassals' Portraits in the reign of King Seonjo (선조대(宣祖代) 공신초상(功臣肖像)의 복식 고찰)

  • Lee, Eun-joo;Kim, Mi-gyung
    • MUNHWAJAE Korean Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies
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    • v.52 no.1
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    • pp.120-147
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    • 2019
  • In this study, we divided the portraits in the reign of King Seonjo into those which were created before and after the Japanese invasion. We then examined various aspect of costumes expressed in the portraits of meritorious vassals. To analyze official uniforms (Heuk-Danryeung), we examined the Samo height; the side wings' type and pattern; the Danryeung pattern; the Mu style; the processing method of lateral lines in Danryeung the rank badge and rank belt, the color of Dabho and Cheolrik, which were undergarment of Danryeung and Heuk-wa. The meritorious vassals' portraits, prior to Imran, were analyzed with a portrait of Han Eung-in, a Gwang-kuk Pyeong-nan meritorious vassals. The Samo was the highest of the Choson dynasties, and the cloud and treasure pattern was identified on the side wings. The Heuk-Danryeung was a dark blue(acheongsaeg) Danryeung of manja-shaped cloud patterns with a large outward wrinkled Mu, and it had a wild goose badge (second rank) and a Sabgeumdae. It did not coincide with the Pumgye(Jaheondaebu) recorded in Gugjo-inmulgo. Reddish Dabho for Dangsang-kwan, green Cheolrik which was undergarment of Danryeung, and Heuk-wa. were identified. After the invasion of Japan, portraits of Hoseong, Seonmu, and Cheong-nan meritorious vassals were analyzed through eighteen portraits, including Lee Hyeon-bok. After the invasion of the Japanese, the height of the Samo's top was much lower and the width of the side wings was wider than before the invasion of Japanese. The Heuk-Danryeung was a dark blue (acheongsaeg) Danryeung of manja-shaped cloud patterns with a stretching backward Mu. Rank badge and rank belts were almost identical with the record, but there were two exceptions (Sin-jab and Kim, Sae-sin). Therefore, it was reaffirmed that the meritorious vassals' portraits were drawn by the Pumgye at the time of appointment. Among the undergarments of Heuk-Danryeung, green Dabho(11), blue Dabho(4), reddish Dabho(3), and blue Cheolrik(10), green Cheolrik(6), reddish Cheolrik(1), and yucheongsaeg Cheolrik(1) were identified, However, it is suggested that the Dabho of Hoseong, Seonmu, and Cheong-nan meritorious vassals should be the reddish Dabho of Dangsang-kwan, which is the same as the previous Imran, and a green Cheolrik.

Features of the Costumes of Officials in the King Jeongjo Period Seojangdaeyajodo (정조대 <서장대야조도(西將臺夜操圖)>의 관직자 복식 고증)

  • LEE, Eunjoo;KIM, Youngsun;LEE, Kyunghee
    • MUNHWAJAE Korean Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies
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    • v.54 no.2
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    • pp.78-97
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    • 2021
  • Seojangdaeyajodo is a drawing of military night training on February 12th (lunar leap month), 1795. Focusing on the Seojangdaeyajodo, the characteristics and of the costumes worn by various types of officials were examined. There were 34 officials located near King Jeongjo in and around Seojangdae, with 27 Dangsanggwan and 7 Danghagwan. They wore three types of costumes, including armor, yungbok, and military uniforms. All of the twelve armor wearers and the five officials wearing yungbok were dangsanggwan, and the military uniform wearers included eleven dangsanggwan and six danghagwan. For the shape of the armor, the armor relics of General Yeoban, suitable for riding horses, and the armor painting of Muyedobotongji were referenced, and the composition of the armor was based on practicality. The armor consists of a helmet, a suit of armor, a neck guard, armpit guards, arm guards, and a crotch guard. The color of the armor was red and green, which are the most frequently used colors in Seojangdaeyajodo. The composition of yungbok was jurip, navy cheollik, red gwangdahoe, socks made of leather, and suhwaja. The composition of the military uniform was a lined jeolrip, dongdari, jeonbok, yodae, jeondae, and suhwaja. There were differences in the fabrics used in dangsanggwan and danghagwan military uniforms. Dangsanggwan used fabric with depictions of clouds and jewels, and danghagwan used unpatterned fabric. Moreover, jade, gold, and silver were used for detailed ornamental materials in dangsanggwan. The weapons included bows and a bow case, a sword, a rattan stick, wrist straps, and a ggakji. In the records of the King Jeongjo period, various colored heopsu were mentioned; the colors of the dongdari and jeonbok of dangsanggwan and danghagwan were referenced in various colors. It was presented as an illustration of costumes that could be used to produce objects accurately reflecting the above historical results. The basic principle of the illustration was to present the modeling standards for 3D content production. Samples of form, color, and material of the corresponding times and statuses were presented. The front, the side, and the back of each costume and its accessories were presented, and the colors were presented in RGB and CMYK.