• Title, Summary, Keyword: 나비

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Analyzing Mutual Relationships Between Nectar Plants and Butterflies for Landscape Design - Focusing on World Cup Park, Seoul - (나비와 흡밀식물과의 관계 분석을 통한 조경설계에의 활용방안 연구 - 서울 월드컵공원을 대상으로 -)

  • Kim, Ji-Seok;Kang, Hyun-Kyung
    • Journal of the Korean Institute of Landscape Architecture
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.11-21
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    • 2011
  • In this paper, in order to select specialist butterfly species that inhabit Haneul and Noeul Parks, previously landfill areas, we verified the reciprocal relationships between nectar plants and butterflies. While we will design the butterfly habitats, this paper will provide the foundation data for selecting the plants. The completed survey indicated that there were a total of 5 families, 23 species and 1,129 individuals. Butterflies of the main action were feeding on nectar, and such behavior was 36% of the total actions. Therefore, these parks play an important role in butterflies feeding on nectar. The correlation between butterflies and the nectar plants' color was not significant; Therefore, it is not necessary to consider flower color when choosing plants to attract the butterflies. In addition, butterflies prefer naturalized plants for feeding on nectar. Thus, when creating butterfly habitats, there is no use in attracting the butterflies by classifying the naturalized plants and native plants. However, if some areas that are need to plant native plants such as Inkigofera pseudo-tinctoria, Lespedeza bicolor, Aster koraiensis make use it, there could be taken an advantage to attract the butterflies. According to the algebraic curve model of curve estimation regression analysis, we were able to classify the generalist species and specialist species by regression analysis. As a result, Colias erate, Artogeia rapae and Parnara guttata were classified as generalist species, where as Rapala caerulea, Pieris melete, Zizera maha and Celastrina argiolus were classified as specialist species. Rapala caerulea prefers hills and forest for its habitat; therefore, it is clearly distinct from Pieris melete, Zizera maha and Celastrina argiolus which prefer grassland for habitats. These results show that Rapala caerulea is high conservation value in a landfill area where is developing ecological succession from grasslands to wood lands. In conclusion, these research are able to contribute to select the target species and suitable species that consider a singularity between butterflies and nectar plants, when we are creating the butterfly habitats, moreover these research will contribute to maintain a stable habitats.

Change of Butterfly Communities After Clear Cutting in Gwangneung Forest (광릉숲에서 개벌 후 나비군집의 변화)

  • Lee, Cheol Min;Kwon, Tae-Sung
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.53 no.4
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    • pp.347-354
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    • 2014
  • This study was carried out to clarify the change of butterfly community after clear cutting. Butterfly survey was conducted in clear cutting area, forest road, and forest using line transect method from May to November in 2011. A total of 32 species and 398 individuals of butterflies were observed. Abundance of food niche breadth and habitat type was significantly higher in clear cutting area than in forest. Estimated species richness and species diversity were significantly higher in clear cutting area than in forest. In clear cutting area, Leptidea amurensis and Argynnis niobe, vulnerable species, were abundant. This result suggests that grasslands formed by clear cutting play an important role to increase butterfly diversity in forest ecosystem.

The Butterfly Community in Is. Guleopdo, Korea and the Dominance of the Endangered Species Argynnis nerippe (굴업도의 나비군집과 멸종위기종 왕은점표범나비의 우점현상)

  • Kim, Sung-Soo;Lee, Cheol-Min;Kwon, Tae-Sung
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.50 no.2
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    • pp.115-123
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    • 2011
  • Although Guleopdo is small island of only $1.71\;km^2$, the endangered butterfly species, Argynnis nerippe, is abundant there. This study was carried out to estimate the abundance of A. nerippe in Guleopdo, using quadrate, mark-recapture, and line-transect methods. Although the study was insufficient, the population size was estimated at 4,467 to 6,700 larvae and approx. 1,000 adults. A. nerippe was the most abundant among butterfly species in Guleopdo, and it comprised 32% of the total butterflies. A total of 28 butterfly species were observed in this study, and 3 species of these species were migrating species. When the abundance of A. nerippe throughout the country during the period from 1938 to 2010 was studied, we found that it decreased abruptly in the 2000s. Presently, A. nerippe inhabits a few locations in the mid-northern region and western islands. The relatively high numbers of A. nerippe in Guleopdo was due to conservation of natural grasslands and grazing of livestock, which provides adequate habitat for this species.

Study on the Pattern and Ecological Variables of Butterfly Species Diversity on 19 Uninhabited Islands around Imja-myeon, Shinan-gun, Jeonnam, Korea (신안군 임자면 일대 무인도서의 나비 종 다양성 양상 및 영향을 주는 인자에 관한 연구)

  • An, Jeong-Seop;Choi, Sei-Woong
    • Korean Journal of Environmental Biology
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    • v.30 no.3
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    • pp.185-192
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    • 2012
  • We investigated butterfly species diversity on nineteen uninhabited islands around Imja-myeon, Shinan-gun, Jeonnam, Korea. A total of 14 species belong to 5 families were identified. Species of Papilionidae were the most abundant with 5 species, followed by Lycaenidae (4 species). A Lycaenid butterfly, Pseudozizeeria maha (Kollar), was the most dominant species on the surveyed islands. The total number of species was the highest at island Daenorokdo (6 species). To investigate the factors that determine butterfly diversity, we analyzed the relationships between number of species and island area, distance from the largest island nearby, and maximum elevation. We found that island area ($R^2$=0.413, p=0.003) was significantly correlated with butterfly diversity, but other variables such as distance from the largest island nearby and maximum elevation were not correlated.

Effects of Host plant, Nectar plant and Vegetation types on Butterfly Communities (먹이식물·흡밀식물·식생이 나비 군집에 미치는 영향)

  • Kim, Do Sung;Cho, Young Bok;Jeong, Jong Chul
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.51 no.4
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    • pp.331-342
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    • 2012
  • The effects of number of host plants and nectar plants on the number and diversity of butterflies were monitored and analyzed by simple and multiple regression from May 2008 to Sep 2009 in the Bubjusa region (Mt. Sokri, Boeun-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do), which was divided into four regions. The results demonstrate that the number of butterflies has a positive correlation with the number of host plant species, the number of nectar plant species, and the number of host plants multiple regression analysis. The number of butterflies also increased habitat area. However, the butterfly species number and diversity index showed lower correlation with the number of host plants and the area size of the divided region, respectively, when analyzed by simple regression. In addition, increased species diversity in a region with more diverse plant flora. These results suggest that the composite distribution of host and nectar plants with diverse plant flora is required for butterfly diversity and population preservation. Additionally, it also suggest that vegetation types complementarity all factors.