DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Genotypic characterization of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from edible offal

  • Son, Se Hyun (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Seo, Kwang Won (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Yeong Bin (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Noh, Eun Bi (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, Keun-Woo (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Oh, Tae-Ho (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Seung-Joon (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Song, Jae-Chan (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Tae-Wan (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, Young Ju (College of Veterinary Medicine & Zoonoses Research Institute, Kyungpook National University)
  • Received : 2020.04.09
  • Accepted : 2020.07.10
  • Published : 2020.09.30

Abstract

Edible offal is easily contaminated by Escherichia coli (E. coli) and fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant E. coli is considered a serious public health problem, thus, this study investigated the genetic characteristics of FQ-resistant E. coli from edible offal. A total of 22 FQ-resistant E. coli isolates were tested. A double mutation in each gyrA and parC led the highest MIC. Four (18.2%) isolates carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes. The fimH, eaeA, escV, astA, and iucC genes were confirmed. Seventeen isolates (77.3%) were positive for plasmid replicons. The isolates showed high genetic heterogeneity based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns.

References

  1. Redgrave LS, Sutton SB, Webber MA, Piddock LJ. Fluoroquinolone resistance: mechanisms, impact on bacteria, and role in evolutionary success. Trends Microbiol 2014;22:438-445. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2014.04.007
  2. Saide-Albornoz JJ, Knipe CL, Murano EA, Beran GW. Contamination of pork carcasses during slaughter, fabrication, and chilled storage. J Food Prot 1995;58:993-997. https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X-58.9.993
  3. Hu YS, Shin S, Park YH, Park KT. Prevalence and mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from swine feces in Korea. J Food Prot 2017;80:1145-1151. https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-16-502
  4. Koo HJ, Woo GJ. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli recovered from foods of animal and fish origin in Korea. J Food Prot 2012;75:966-972. https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-003
  5. Oh JY, Kwon YK, Tamang MD, Jang HK, Jeong OM, Lee HS, Kang MS. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from wild birds and chickens in South Korea. Microb Drug Resist 2016;22:69-79. https://doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2015.0090
  6. Son SH, Seo KW, Kim YB, Jeon HY, Noh EB, Lee YJ. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from edible offal in Korea. J Food Prot 2019;82:1183-1190. https://doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-18-458
  7. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing; Twentythird Informational Supplement. CLSI document M100-S23. Wayne: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2013.
  8. Magiorakos AP, Srinivasan A, Carey RB, Carmeli Y, Falagas ME, Giske CG, Harbarth S, Hindler JF, Kahlmeter G, Olsson-Liljequist B, Paterson DL, Rice LB, Stelling J, Struelens MJ, Vatopoulos A, Weber JT, Monnet DL. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance. Clin Microbiol Infect 2012;18:268-281. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03570.x
  9. Kagambega A, Martikainen O, Lienemann T, Siitonen A, Traor AS, Barro N, Haukka K. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli detected by 16-plex PCR in raw meat and beef intestines sold at local markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Int J Food Microbiol 2012;153:154-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2011.10.032
  10. Tarchouna M, Ferjani A, Ben-Selma W, Boukadida J. Distribution of uropathogenic virulence genes in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infection. Int J Infect Dis 2013;17:e450-e453. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2013.01.025
  11. Johnson TJ, Wannemuehler YM, Johnson SJ, Logue CM, White DG, Doetkott C, Nolan LK. Plasmid replicon typing of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates. Appl Environ Microbiol 2007;73:1976-1983. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02171-06
  12. Ribot EM, Fair MA, Gautom R, Cameron DN, Hunter SB, Swaminathan B, Barrett TJ. Standardization of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocols for the subtyping of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella for PulseNet. Foodborne Pathog Dis 2006;3:59-67. https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2006.3.59
  13. Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency (APQA). National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program. Available from: https://ebook.qia.go.kr/20180704_110723.
  14. Moon DC, Seol SY, Gurung M, Jin JS, Choi CH, Kim J, Lee YC, Cho DT, Lee JC. Emergence of a new mutation and its accumulation in the topoisomerase IV gene confers high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli isolates. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2010;35:76-79. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2009.08.003
  15. Yang QE, Sun J, Li L, Deng H, Liu BT, Fang LX, Liao XP, Liu YH. IncF plasmid diversity in multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains from animals in China. Front Microbiol 2015;6:964.