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Effects of low-dose organic trace minerals on performance, mineral status, and fecal mineral excretion of sows

  • Ma, Lianxiang (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • He, Junna (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • Lu, Xintao (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • Qiu, Jialing (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • Hou, Chuanchuan (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • Liu, Bing (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture) ;
  • Lin, Gang (Institute of Quality Standards and Testing Technology for Agricultural Products, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences) ;
  • Yu, Dongyou (College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed in East China of Ministry of Agriculture)
  • Received : 2018.11.15
  • Accepted : 2019.03.24
  • Published : 2020.01.01

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effects of low-dose trace mineral proteinates on reproductive performance, mineral status, milk immunoglobulin contents and fecal mineral excretion of sows. Methods: Eighty crossbred sows (Landrace×Large White) were randomly allocated to two groups in a 135-day trail, from breeding through 21 d postpartum. The two treatments were inorganic trace minerals (ITM): a basal diet+inorganic iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) at 90, 15, 25 and 90 mg/kg, respectively and organic trace minerals (OTM): a basal diet+proteinates of Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn at 72, 12, 20, and 72 mg/kg, respectively. Results: Compared with ITM, OTM significantly increased (p<0.05) the number of piglets with birthweight >1 kg, the litter weaning weight, and milk Fe, Cu contents. No significant differences (p>0.05) were observed on sow hair mineral contents or immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and IgA contents in colostrum and milk. In comparsion to ITM, OTM decreased fecal Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn contents of gestating sows (p<0.01) and Fe, Mn, and Zn in lactating sows (p<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that low-dose mineral proteinates can increase the number of piglets with birthweight >1 kg, the litter weaning weight and certain milk mineral concentrations while reducing fecal mineral excretion.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Zhejiang Science and Technology Department

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