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Relation of Organic Matter Content and Nitrogen Mineralization of Soils Collected from Pepper Cultivated Land

고추 재배 밭에서 채취한 토양의 유기물 함량과 질소 무기화 량의 관계

  • Lee, Yejin (Division of Soil & Fertilizer, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Lee, Seulbi (Division of Soil & Fertilizer, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Yangmin (Division of Soil & Fertilizer, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Song, Yosung (Division of Soil & Fertilizer, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Lee, Deogbae (Division of Soil & Fertilizer, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration)
  • 이예진 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원 농업환경부 토양비료과) ;
  • 이슬비 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원 농업환경부 토양비료과) ;
  • 김양민 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원 농업환경부 토양비료과) ;
  • 송요성 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원 농업환경부 토양비료과) ;
  • 이덕배 (농촌진흥청 국립농업과학원 농업환경부 토양비료과)
  • Received : 2019.07.31
  • Accepted : 2019.09.10
  • Published : 2019.09.30

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Estimation of soil nitrogen supply is essential to manage nitrogen fertilization in arable land. In Korea, nitrogen fertilization is recommended based on the soil organic matter content because it is difficult to assess nitrogen (N) mineralization of upland soils directly. In this study, the relationship between soil organic matter (SOM) content and N mineralization was investigated to explore the limitation of using SOM in predicting soil N mineralization. METHODS AND RESULTS: Soil samples from the 0 to 10 cm depth were collected from 18 individual pepper cultivated fields in Tae-an and Chung-yang provinces before fertilization. N mineralization in the soils was quantified using incubation for 70 days at $30^{\circ}C$. The mineralizable soil N (MSN) was positively correlated with SOM, and the relation equation between MSN and SOM was '$MSN(kg\;10a^{-1})=0.2933{\ast}SOM(g\;kg^{-1})+0.0897$ ($r^2=0.6224$, p<0.001)'. However, the differences of N mineralization among the soils with the similar concentrations of soil organic matter were about 3 to 4.6 times, suggesting that the other soil factors such as total N concentration or EC should affect N mineralization. CONCLUSION: We concluded that SOM alone could not reflect the capacity of soil to supply N that is used for recommendation of N fertilization rate. Therefore, other soil properties should be considered to improve N fertilization management in arable land for sustainable agriculture.

Keywords

Mineralization;Nitrogen;Soil Organic Matter;Upland Soil

Acknowledgement

Supported by : National Institute of Agricultural Sciences

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