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Effects of dietary energy and protein levels on reproductive performance in gestating sows and growth of their progeny

  • Fang, Lin Hu (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Jin, Ying Hai (Department of Animal Science, Yanbian University) ;
  • Jeong, Jae Hark (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Hong, Jin Su (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Chung, Woo Lim (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Yoo Yong (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University)
  • Received : 2019.04.08
  • Accepted : 2019.05.01
  • Published : 2019.05.31

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary energy and crude protein (CP) levels on reproductive performance, litter performance, milk quality, and blood profiles in gestating sows. A total of 59 multiparous sows (Yorkshire ${\times}$ Landrace) with similar body weights (BW), backfat thickness (BF), and parity were assigned to one of six treatments with 9 or 10 sows per treatment using a $2{\times}3$ factorial arrangement and completely randomized design. The first factor was two levels of dietary metabolizable energy (ME) density (13.40 or 13.82 MJ/kg) and the second factor was three dietary protein levels based from 35 day in gestating phases (10.5%, 12%, and 13.5%). Backfat thickness change in lactating sows decreased linearly as CP level increased (p = 0.03). Increased energy level in the gestating sow diet tended to increase the total number of piglets born (p = 0.07), but piglet weight decreased (p = 0.02). Dietary CP level had a negative effect on colostrum quality. Casein, protein, total solid, and solids-not-fat concentrations decreased linearly and lactose level increased linearly as CP level in the gestating sow diet increased (casein%: p = 0.03; protein%: p = 0.04; lactose%: p = 0.06; total solids: p = 0.03; solid-not-fat: p = 0.03, respectively). However, improving ME by 0.42 MJ/kg had no significant effect on the chemical composition of sow colostrum. There were no significant differences in blood glucose concentration in gestating sows when sows were fed different levels of energy during gestation, but blood glucose increased at 21 day of lactation when energy increased by 0.42 MJ/kg (p = 0.04). Blood urea nitrogen concentration increased linearly when dietary CP levels increased at 110 day in gestation, 24-hours postpartum, and 21 days of lactation (linear, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively), and it also increased when dietary energy increased at 110 days of gestation and 24-hours postpartum (p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). A gestating sow diet containing 13.82 MJ/kg ME and 10.5% CP can improve reproductive performance, litter performance, and colostrum quality.

Keywords

Energy;Crude protein;Reproductive performance;Litter performance;Blood profiles;Gestating sows

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Rural Development Administration

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