DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Effects of physically effective neutral detergent fiber content on dry matter intake, digestibility, and chewing activity in Korean native goats (Capra hircus coreanae) fed with total mixed ration

  • Jang, Se Young (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Kim, Eun Kyung (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Park, Jae Hyun (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Oh, Mi Rae (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Tang, Yu Jiao (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Ding, Yu Ling (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Seong, Hye Jin (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Kim, Won Ho (National Institute of Animal Science, RDA) ;
  • Yun, Yeong Sik (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University) ;
  • Moon, Sang Ho (Division of Food Bio Science, Korea Nokyong Research Center, Konkuk University)
  • Received : 2016.11.11
  • Accepted : 2017.04.10
  • Published : 2017.10.01

Abstract

Objective: This experiment was to determine proper physical traits in the diet for goats by investigating the effects of physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) content on dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility, and chewing activity in black goats fed with total mixed ration (TMR). Methods: Six growing wethers of Korean native black goats (Capra hircus coreanae) aged 8 months and weighing between 26.9 kg and 27.1 kg ($27.03{\pm}5.05kg$) were used in this experiment. Three diets of varying peNDF content were obtained by original TMR (T1), 12,000 rpm grinding (T2), and 15,500 rpm grinding (T3) of the same TMR diet. The $peNDF_{1.18}$ content of the experimental diets was 23.85%, 21.71%, and 16.22% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Results: Average daily gain (ADG) was higher in T2 group compared to those of the control and T3 groups, but ADG and DMI were not affected by the dietary particle size and peNDF content. Also, there was no difference between apparent nutrient digestibility of dry matter, crude fiber, ether extract, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber. Although there was no significant difference, rumination and total chewing time were associated with decreased peNDF content. Conclusion: The feeding of peNDF-based TMR showed no impact on apparent nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance. Further studies are required with a wider range of dietary peNDF level and particle size to better identify the effect of dietary peNDF and particle size on chewing activity and performance in goats.

Keywords

Black Goat;Chewing Activity;Digestibility;Dry Matter Intake;Physically Effective Neutral Detergent Fiber (peNDF)

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Rural Development Administration

References

  1. Sahlu T, Goetsch AL. A foresight on goat research. Small Rumin Res 2005;60:7-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.smallrumres.2005.06.002
  2. Son YS. Production and uses of Korean native black goat. Small Rumin Res 1999;34:303-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0921-4488(99)00081-4
  3. Choi SH, Hwangbo S, Kim SW, et al. Effects of dietary energy level on growth and meat quality of Korean black goats. J Anim Sci 2007; 49:509-14.
  4. Van Niekerk WA, Casey NH. The boer goat. II. Growth, nutrient requirements, carcass and meat quality. Small Rumin Res 1988;1: 355-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/0921-4488(88)90061-2
  5. Park JH, Kim KH, Park PJ, et al. Effects of physically effective neutral detergent fibre content on dry-matter intake, digestibility and chewing activity in beef cattle fed total mixed ration. Anim Prod Sci 2014;55: 166-9.
  6. Sudweeks EM, Ely LO, Mertens DR, Sisk LR. Assessing minimum amounts and form of roughages in ruminant diets: Roughage value index system. J Anim Sci 1981;53:1406-11. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas1981.5351406x
  7. Mertens DR. Creating a system for meeting the fiber requirements of dairy cows. J Dairy Sci 1997;80:1463-81. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(97)76075-2
  8. Lammers BP, Buckmaster DR, Heinrichs AJ. A simple method for the analysis of particle sizes of forage and total mixed rations. J Dairy Sci 1996;79:922-8. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(96)76442-1
  9. Kononoff PJ, Heinrichs AJ. The effect of reducing alfalfa hay large particle size on cows in early lactation. J Dairy Sci 2003;86:1445-57. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(03)73728-X
  10. Allen MS, Mertens DR. Evaluating constraints of fiber digestion by rumen microbes. J Nutr 1988;118:261-70. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/118.2.261
  11. AOAC. Official methods of analysis, 15th ed. Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Arlington, VA: AOAC International; 1990. pp. 69-90.
  12. Goering HK, Van Soest PJ. Forage fiber analyses (Apparatus reagents, procedures, and some applications). Agric. Handbook No. 379. ARS USDA. Washington DC: USDA; 1970.
  13. National Research Council. Nutrient requirements of small ruminants. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2007.
  14. Einarson MS, Plaizier JC, Wittenberg KM. Effects of barley silage chop length on productivity and rumen conditions of lactating dairy cows fed a total mixed ration. J Dairy Sci 2004;87:2987-96. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(04)73430-X
  15. Beauchemin KA, Yang WZ. Effects of physically effective fiber on intake, chewing activity, and ruminal acidosis for dairy cows fed diets based in corn silage. J Dairy Sci 2005;88:2117-29. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(05)72888-5
  16. Yang WZ, Beauchemin KA. Effects of physically effective fiber on chewing activity and ruminal pH of dairy cows fed diets based on barley silage. J Dairy Sci 2006;89:217-28. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(06)72086-0
  17. Li F, Yang XJ, Cao YC, et al. Effects of dietary effective fiber to rumen degradable starch ratios on the risk of sub-acute ruminal acidosis and rumen content fatty acids composition in dairy goat. Anim Feed Sci 2014;189:54-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2013.12.011
  18. Soita HW, Christensen DA, Mckinnon JJ, Mustafa AF. Effects of barley silage of different theoretical cut length on digestion kinetics in ruminants. Canadian J Anim Sci 2002;82:207-13. https://doi.org/10.4141/A01-064
  19. Yang WZ, Beauchemin KA. Increasing the physically effective fiber content of dairy cow diets may lower efficiency of feed use. J Dairy Sci 2006;89:2694-704. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(06)72345-1
  20. Morand-Fehr P. Recent developments in goat nutrition and application: A review. Small Rumin Res 2005;60: 25-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.smallrumres.2005.06.004
  21. Church DC. Livestock feeds and feeding 3rd. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall; 1991.
  22. Desnoyers M, Duvaux-Ponter C, Rigalma K, et al. Effect of concentrate percentage on ruminal pH and time-budget in dairy goats. Animal 2008;2:1802-8. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1751731108003157
  23. Li F, Li ZJ, Li SX, et al. Effect of dietary physically effective fiber on ruminal fermentation and the fatty acid profile of milk in dairy goats. J Dairy Sci 2014;97:2281-90. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2013-6895