DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Circulating Aneuploid Cells Detected in the Blood of Patients with Infectious Lung Diseases

  • Kim, Hongsun (Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Cho, Jong Ho (Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Sonn, Chung-Hee (Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Kim, Jae-Won (Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Choi, Yul (Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Lee, Jinseon (Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine) ;
  • Kim, Jhingook (Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine)
  • Received : 2016.07.13
  • Accepted : 2016.12.13
  • Published : 2017.04.05

Abstract

The identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is clinically important for diagnosing cancer. We have previously developed a size-based filtration platform followed by epithelial cell adhesion molecule immunofluorescence staining for detecting CTCs. To characterize CTCs independently of cell surface protein expression, we incorporated a chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay to detect abnormal copy numbers of chromosomes in cells collected from peripheral blood samples by the size-based filtration platform. Aneuploid cells were detected in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. Unexpectedly, aneuploid cells were also detected in the control group, which consisted of peripheral blood samples from patients with benign lung diseases, such as empyema necessitatis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. These findings suggest that chromosomal abnormalities are observed not only in tumor cells, but also in benign infectious diseases. Thus, our findings present new considerations and bring into light the possibility of false positives when using FISH for cancer diagnosis.

References

  1. Cristofanilli M, Budd GT, Ellis MJ, et al. Circulating tumor cells, disease progression, and survival in metastatic breast cancer. N Engl J Med 2004;351:781-91. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa040766
  2. Krebs MG, Sloane R, Priest L, et al. Evaluation and prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. J Clin Oncol 2011;29: 1556-63. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2010.28.7045
  3. Truini A, Alama A, Dal Bello MG, et al. Clinical applications of circulating tumor cells in lung cancer patients by CellSearch system. Front Oncol 2014;4:242.
  4. Punnoose EA, Atwal SK, Spoerke JM, et al. Molecular biomarker analyses using circulating tumor cells. PLoS One 2010;5:e12517. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0012517
  5. Yu M, Bardia A, Wittner BS, et al. Circulating breast tumor cells exhibit dynamic changes in epithelial and mesenchymal composition. Science 2013;339:580-4. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1228522
  6. Gorges TM, Tinhofer I, Drosch M, et al. Circulating tumour cells escape from EpCAM-based detection due to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. BMC Cancer 2012;12:178. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-12-178
  7. Kim EH, Lee JK, Kim BC, et al. Enrichment of cancer cells from whole blood using a microfabricated porous filter. Anal Biochem 2013;440:114-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2013.05.016
  8. Pantel K, Deneve E, Nocca D, et al. Circulating epithelial cells in patients with benign colon diseases. Clin Chem 2012;58:936-40. https://doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2011.175570
  9. Ward BE, Gersen SL, Carelli MP, et al. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by fluorescence in situ hybridization: clinical experience with 4,500 specimens. Am J Hum Genet 1993;52:854-65.
  10. Tsai S, Wear DJ, Shih JW, Lo SC. Mycoplasmas and oncogenesis: persistent infection and multistage malignant transformation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1995;92:10197-201. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.92.22.10197
  11. Lay G, Poquet Y, Salek-Peyron P, et al. Langhans giant cells from M. tuberculosis-induced human granulomas cannot mediate mycobacterial uptake. J Pathol 2007;211: 76-85. https://doi.org/10.1002/path.2092
  12. Flaig TW, Wilson S, van Bokhoven A, et al. Detection of circulating tumor cells in metastatic and clinically localized urothelial carcinoma. Urology 2011;78:863-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2011.05.045
  13. Ntouroupi TG, Ashraf SQ, McGregor SB, et al. Detection of circulating tumour cells in peripheral blood with an automated scanning fluorescence microscope. Br J Cancer 2008;99:789-95. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604545